82nd Infantry Volunteers 
Partial Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 82nd Ohio Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 15 [S# 15]
MAY 8, 1862.-- Engagement near McDowell (Bull Pasture Mountain), Va.
NO. 3.--Report of Brig. Gen. Robert C. Schenck, U.S. Army, commanding brigade.

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        I submit herewith the reports of Brigadier-General Milroy and of Col. James Cantwell,(*) commanding the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of my brigade, giving an account of the affair with the rebel forces that day and of the parts severally taken in the fight by the different regiments engaged.

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        The force detailed for this purpose consisted of portions of four regiments of infantry of his brigade-- the Seventy-fifth, Twenty-fifth, and Thirty-second Ohio and the Third West Virginia-- and the Eighty-second Ohio, of mine, the latter regiment gladly receiving the order to Join in the enterprise, although the men were exhausted with the long march from which they had just arrived, with want of food, sleep, and rest. The infantry was supported in a degree also by a 6-pounder of Johnson's battery, which General Milroy had succeeded in conveying to the top of one of the mountain ridges on his left. The movement resulted in a very sharp encounter with the rebels of which details are given in the accompanying reports. To those details I refer. I will only add, by way of general summing up, that, adding to the 1,768 of Milroy's brigade about 500 of the Eighty-second Ohio, which was the number in the action, the entire force we had engaged was 2,268. That these men were opposed to, I believe, not less than 5,000 of the enemy successively brought into action, besides their reserved force of some 8,000 in the rear; that the casualties on our part amounted in the aggregate to 28 killed, 80 severely wounded, 145 slightly wounded, and 3 missing, making a total of 256.(+) <ar15_464>

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        Too much praise cannot be awarded to General Milroy himself; to Colonel McLean, of the Seventy-fifth Ohio; Colonel Cantwell, Eighty-second Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Richardson, commanding the Twenty-fifth Ohio; Major Reily, Seventy-fifth Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Swinney, commanding Thirty-second Ohio; Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson, Third West Virginia Infantry, and the officers and men of their several commands for their steady gallantry and courage manifested through out the whole affair. No veteran troops, I am sure, ever acquitted themselves with more ardor, and yet with such order and coolness, as they displayed in marching and fighting up that steep mountain side in the face of a hot and incessant fire.

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                                                            ROBT. C. SCHENCK,
                                                                    Brigadier-General.

                                                            Col. ALBERT TRACY,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., Headquarters Mountain Department.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 15 [S# 15]
MAY 8, 1862.-- Engagement near McDowell (Bull Pasture Mountain), Va.
NO. 4--Report of Brig. Gen. Robert H. Milroy, U. S. Army, commanding brigade.

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        For this purpose the following troops were placed at my disposal: The Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Thirty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Third West Virginia Volunteer Infantry. These regiments were by no means full, various companies of each being detailed for special duty.

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        Which is the entire number of field officers, company officers, and privates of this brigade engaged. The exact number of the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry engaged is not known to me, but has doubtless been reported to you.

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        The regiments named, however, attacked them briskly and kept up a destructive fire, causing the enemy to waver several times; but fresh re-enforcements being brought up by them, and a portion of their re-enforcements coming down the turnpike, the Third West Virginia became exposed to their fire in its front and rear. Unable, however, to withstand the fire of the Third West Virginia, the latter re-enforcements joined the main body of the rebels and the contest became general and bloody. While the Third West Virginia and Thirty-second and Eighty-second Ohio were advancing on the enemy a 6-pounder, of Johnson's battery, under command of Lieutenant Powers, was with the greatest difficulty placed in position on the mountain on the left of the turnpike, and gave efficient support to the attack. During the engagement I also ordered two 12-pounders, of <ar15_467> Johnson's (Twelfth Ohio) battery, to be placed upon the pike, but they could not be placed in position until after twilight.

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        To Brigadier-General Schenck, for his advice, counsel, and active co-operation, and to the officers and men of the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who so bravely sustained my brigade, I owe my warmest thanks.

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                                                            R. H. MILROY,
                                                                    Brigadier-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 15 [S# 15]
MAY 8, 1862.-- Engagement near McDowell (Bull Pasture Mountain), Va.
NO. 5.--Report of Col. Nathaniel C. McLean, Seventy-fifth Ohio Infantry.

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        At about this time the Thirty-second Ohio, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Swinney, and the Eighty-second Ohio, under command of Colonel Cantwell, came to our aid and took position in our midst. The fighting continued around the crest of the hill at this point until I was informed that the Twenty-fifth Ohio were out of ammunition and that some of my own regiment (the Seventy-fifth Ohio) were in the same condition, although every man of my own regiment started in the action with 60 rounds. The evening also was well advanced, so that our men could only see the enemy by the flashes of their guns. The moon was shining, but did not give sufficient light to enable the men to shoot with accuracy. Under these circumstances I determined to withdraw the forces, and so gave the order. I formed the Seventy-fifth Ohio in line of battle under the crest of the hill, sufficiently low down to be out of the worst of the fire, and marched them down the mountain in this order as well as the nature of the ground would permit, so as at any time to be able to face to the rear and fire upon the enemy in case they should attempt to follow us. Upon reaching the road I halted and waited until the Twenty-fifth Ohio, the Eighty-second Ohio, and the Thirty-second Ohio had all returned to the road, when we marched back to McDowell. The action was a most severe one, as is shown by the report of the killed and wounded already in your possession.
        My officers and men alike bore themselves most bravely in the action. Lieutenant-Colonel Constable, being sick, was unable to be with us, but Major Reily rendered most important and gallant service during the whole engagement, rallying the men and keeping them to their work, when (as it was the case at times) the enemy seemed by the increase of their fire to have brought new forces into the action.
        I had but one officer wounded; and of them all, so far as they came under my observation, I can speak in the warmest terms as regards their gallant conduct during the action.
        I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            N. C. McLEAN,
                                                                    Colonel Seventy-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

                                                            Brigadier-General MILROY.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No. 25.--Report of Brig. Gen. Robert H. Milroy, U. S. Army, commanding Independent Brigade, First Corps, Army Of Virginia, of operations August 13-31.

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        General Carl Schurz had been obliged to retire with his two brigades an hour before, and then the whole rebel force was turned against my brigade, and my brave lads were dashed back before the storm of bullets like chaff before the tempest. I then ordered my reserve battery into position a short distance in the rear, and when five guns had got into position one of the wheel horses was shot dead, but I ordered it to unlimber where they were, and the six guns mowed the rebels with grape and canister with fine effect. My reserve regiment, the Third Virginia, now opened with telling effect. Colonel Cantwell, of the Eighty-second Ohio, was shot through the brain and instantly killed while trying to rally his regiment during the thickest of the fight.

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        Comment is unnecessary. I felt that all the blood, treasure: and labor of our Government and people for the last year had been thrown away by that unfortunate order, and that most probably the death-knell of our glorious Government had been sounded by it. The highest praise I can award to the officers and soldiers of my brigade, in all the hard service and fighting through which we have passed, is that they have bravely, cheerfully, patiently, and nobly performed their duty. Colonels Cantwell, of the Eighty-second Ohio, and Zeigler, of the Fifth Virginia, deserve particular mention for their coolness and bravery in the long and desperate fight of the 29th with the rebels at the railroad. In the death of Colonel Cantwell the country, as well as his family, have sustained an irreparable loss. No braver man or truer patriot ever lived. He constantly studied the best interests of his soldiers and of the country, and his men loved, obeyed, and respected him as a father. Truly the loss of such an officer in these trying times is a great calamity.

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                                                            R. H. MILROY,
                                                                    Brig. Gen., Comdg. Indepdt. Brig., First Corps, Army of Va.

                                                            Maj. T. A. MEYSENBERG,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


SERIES I--VOLUME XII/3 [S# 18]
Correspondence, orders, and returns relating specially to operations in Northern Virginia, West Virginia, and Maryland from March 17 to September 2, 1862.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#1

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        The infantry consists of part of the Potomac Home Brigade, the Fifth Virginia, and the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers ; arms mostly smooth-bore muskets and Enfield rifles. The cavalry is armed with sabers and revolvers, but have no carbines.

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                                                            W. S. ROSECRANS,
                                                                    Brigadier-General, U. S. Army.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 252.--Report of Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division, with correspondence, &c.

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        The dispositions I made are shown in detail on Diagram No. 2; in addition to which I have to observe that the two regiments forming my extreme right were ordered by me to be placed in column on the open field immediately on the left of General McLean's brigade, so as to give them liberty of movement, but that they were drawn back behind the fence and deployed in line of battle on the old Turnpike road, as I understand, by special directions from headquarters. Behind my Second Brigade, Colonel Krzyzanowski, I placed a strong reserve, so as to be able to assist Colonel Buschbeck, whose line was at the time very thin. The Eighty-second Ohio I kept farther back, as a general reserve. My pickets were at a suitable distance in front, south of the Plank road, connecting with those of General Devens on the right and General Steinwehr on the left. Captain Dilger's battery was placed at the junction of the two roads, commanding the Plank road, the valley below, and the woods beyond.

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        Immediately east of Talley's farm, where General Devens had his headquarters, General McLean's left connected with my right, consisting of the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania and the Sixty-first Ohio, of General Schimmelfennig's brigade, deployed in line of battle on the road, having an embankment in their front and the thickest kind of pine undergrowth immediately in their rear; on their left the Sixty-eighth New York, of the same brigade, also in line of battle; the sharpshooters of the brigade in the little piece of woods between the two roads east of the open field flanking the line; the Eighty-second Illinois and the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York behind General Schimmelfennig's left, in second line, connecting with General Schimmelfennig's left; the One hundred and nineteenth New York, of my Second Brigade, occupying the southern border of the little piece of woods above mentioned; then Dilger's battery; the Fifty-eighth New York in the church grove; behind the interval the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, and farther to the left the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, in second line, and the Eighty-second Ohio still farther back, as above stated. On the left of Captain Dilger's battery commenced Colonel Buschbeck's brigade, part of which was deployed in the rifle-pits; Captain Wiedrich's battery, from which two pieces had been detached to General Barlow's brigade, stood near Colonel Buschbeck's right on high ground. On the left of Colonel Buschbeck, General Barlow's brigade, with one section of Captain Wiedrich's battery. Farther to the left, troops of other corps. A rifle-pit was constructed, running north and south, on the west of the eminence east of Dowdall's Tavern. The Reserve Artillery, which arrived in the course of the day, was placed on that eminence.

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        In the absence of orders, but becoming more and more convinced that the enemy's attack would come from the west and fall upon our right and rear, I took it upon my own responsibility to detach two regiments from the second line of my Second Brigade, and to place them in a good position on the right and left of the Ely's Ford road, west of Hawkins' farm, so as to check the enemy if he should attack our extreme right and penetrate through the woods at that point. This was subsequently approved by you. The regiments I selected were the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin. The Seventy fifth Pennsylvania had to relieve the pickets of the Second Brigade, and was replaced by the Fifty-eighth New York. The Eighty-second Ohio I placed at some distance behind the left of the Fifty-eighth New York. The disposition of my troops was then as shown on Diagram No. 3, and, no orders reaching me, it remained so until the battle commenced. With these exceptions, no change was made in the position occupied by the corps.

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        The Sixty-eighth New York received the order to occupy the western edge of the same piece of woods, the southern border of which had been occupied by the One hundred and nineteenth. On the right of the One hundred and nineteenth formed the One hundred and fifty seventh New York, then the Eighty-second Illinois, and farther to the right the Eighty-second Ohio, the latter receiving from me the order to cover the left of the Fifty-eighth New York, to fire one volley if the enemy should break through the woods in front, and then to make a bayonet charge. The Fifty-eighth New York and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, on the extreme right, remained as they were, under the immediate command of Colonel Krzyzanowski. Captain Dilger, commanding my battery, drew his pieces back to the high ground, near Wiedrich’s battery, and opened upon the columns of the enemy as soon as they showed themselves on the old turnpike.

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        The Eighty-second Ohio was directed to draw farther to the right, and to occupy the projecting angle of the woods on the right and rear of the church grove; but, while executing this order, one of your aides directed him to occupy the right of the north and south rifle-pit, where the regiment established itself.

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        The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin had, in the meantime, been very severely pressed on the extreme right, and there the regiment lost somewhat its compactness, the woods being very thick and the wing companies becoming detached. It was at that moment when I rejoined you behind the rifle pit, which was manned in the center by some of Colonel Buschbeck's regiments; on the left by several companies of the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania, Sixty-first Ohio, and One hundred and nineteenth New York, and on the extreme right by the Eighty-second Ohio. Several pieces of the Reserve Artillery were still firing.

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        The enemy advancing on our right and left with rapidity, the artillery ceased firing, and soon the rifle-pit was given up. The Eighty-second Ohio maintained itself very bravely there until the whole of the rifle-pit was abandoned. The loss of that regiment on this spot was very heavy. It was then after 7 p.m.
        The retreat now became general, and the confusion increased as the troops marched through the woods. The One hundred and fifty-seventh New York, still in good order, stopped several times, firing and charging upon the pursuing enemy.
        Captain Dilger had sent his battery toward Chancellorsville, keeping one piece with him, which he brought several times into action with very good success during the retreat of the corps. The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, Eighty-second Ohio, One hundred and fifty-seventh New York, and the Eighty-second Illinois halted on the right of a line occupied by what was supposed to be General Berry's division. There they remained until about 8.30 p.m., when they retreated farther, to an open space north of Chancellorsville.

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                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Major-General, Comdg. Third Division, Eleventh Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                    Commanding Eleventh Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 256.--Report of Col. Wladimir Krzyzanowski, Fifty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding Second Brigade.

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        It appeared, however, that the enemy came upon our lines in an oblique direction, completely outflanking my forces on the right, and messing in front of them, in consequence of which it became necessary to withdraw; but, not desiring to take the responsibility, I sent one of my staff officers, Lieutenant [Louis H.] Orleman, to you, with a request for re-enforcements, but I received orders from you to fall back to the border of the woods on the right of the intrenchments, which woods, being very thick, caused the wing companies of the regiments to be detached. When the intrenchments were abandoned, my troops fell back upon the line occupied by General Berry's division. Here I was joined by the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers, Colonel Robinson, part of the Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, and the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York Volunteers, Colonel Brown. We occupied this position for upward of one hour. The firing having by that time been somewhat discontinued, and my forces being separated from the rest of the corps, I concluded to make proper efforts to join the rest of the corps near a large farm house north of Chancellorsville, in which I succeeded. Nearly one hour later I received orders to proceed to Chancellorsville, and there join the remainder of the troops.

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                                                            W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Col., Comdg. 2d Brig., 3d Div., 11th Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. CARL SCHURZ,
                                                                    Commanding Third Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 262. -- Report of Maj. August Ledig,
Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry.

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        On the 30th, we rested.
        July 1.--At 5 a.m. we left camp, and proceeded to Gettysburg. We arrived there at 1.30 a.m. We were immediately ordered to the north side of the town, where the regiment was placed as follows: On my left (the extreme left of the Second Brigade), the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers; on my right, the One hundred and nineteenth New York Regiment, in line of battle. Here we received a heavy fire from the enemy's 10-pounder rifled guns, which caused a loss in the regiment of 1 killed and 2 wounded. About 2 o'clock, the whole brigade advanced nearly one-half mile, which was greatly interrupted by fences, which had to be taken down under a heavy fire of musketry from the enemy. When within 100 yards of them, in a wheat-field, we charged upon them and drove them back. We halted, and opened fire on the enemy. The Eighty-second Ohio, on my left, was flanked, and gave way. Col. F. Mahler's horse was shot, but he [The colonel] got up again, and went forward to direct the fire to the left flank, which was now unprotected, and the enemy threatening to cut off our retreat. He was already within 40 yards of our left and rear.
        Colonel Mahler at this moment received a severe wound, and was disabled, so I took the command, and directed at once the fire left-oblique, and began to retreat behind a fence, which I could only pass by the flank, moving my left flank through first, so as to give the enemy battle on my left and front.
        During this short period-say fifteen minutes--I lost 111 killed and wounded.
        I began now to retreat about 200 yards into an orchard. The One hundred and nineteenth New York Regiment, on my right, suffered also heavily from the flank attack, and moved backward also in the garden. I received orders to fall back on the town. Here the Second Division arrived and went into the engagement. Shortly after this, a new line behind the town was ordered, and formed by my regiment in the best of order. I was ordered in a corn-field behind a stone wall, below the Evergreen Cemetery, the Eighty-second Ohio on my right, the First Brigade on my left.

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                                                            AUGUST LEDIG,
                                                                    Major, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Col. W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Commanding Second Brigade.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 186.--Report of Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger, U.S. Army, commanding Second Brigade.

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        A detailed report of the killed and wounded is appended to this report. The precise loss of the enemy I do not know, as the brigade moved before his dead was collected. It must have been much greater than ours, however, as there were a great many dead left in our front. The behavior of the brigade in this action was excellent. The Third Brigade on my left repulsed the attack of the enemy on their front with equal ease. After the action two regiments of that brigade, the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers and the Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, relieved, respectively, the Thirteenth New Jersey Volunteers and One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers. This position was maintained during the night. About 12 o'clock at night considerable firing by the enemy occurred on my right, but did not extend to my line. The enemy retreated during the night

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                                                            THOMAS H. RUGER,
                                                                    Brigadier-General of Volunteers, Commanding.

                                                            Capt. S. E. PITTMAN,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 190.--Report of Col. Ezra A. Carman, Thirteenth New Jersey Infantry.

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        The attacking column was Stewart's division, of Hood's corps; the regiments in my immediate front, Thirty-first Alabama and Forty-second Georgia. Thirteen prisoners were taken or came into my command from the above-named two regiments. The loss of my regiment in this action was 4 enlisted men killed and 3 officers and 15 men wounded (see appendix to this report, A). After the repulse of the enemy I was relieved by the Eighty-second Ohio, Third Brigade, First Division, Twentieth Army Corps. May 16, marched from Green's Station, in a southeasterly direction, to Coosawattee River, where we remained until morning of May 17, when we crossed the Coosawattee at Newtown; marched in a southerly direction twelve miles, to near Calhoun. May 18, marched about twenty miles in a southwesterly direction. May 19, broke camp at 1.20 p.m., marched about three miles, where we formed line and advanced about 500 yards, crossing two creeks, driving in cavalry vedettes, and emerging on the open ground in front of Cassville.

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BATTLE OF KENESAW MOUNTAIN.

        June 27, at 3.30 a.m. moved to our left and relieved three regiments of Second Division, and put in support of battery commanded by Captain McGill. At 7.45 a.m. the enemy opened a very heavy and concentrated fire on the position, which was continued furiously until 11.30 a.m.; but the men being protected by heavy works, the loss was only 1 man wounded. On the failure of the assault on Kenesaw Mountain the regiment returned to its original position, where we remained until July 3; at 4 a.m. advanced through the evacuated works of the enemy to near Marietta, where we turned to the right, marching southeastwardly, halting about three miles from Marietta. July 4, marched two miles south. July 5, passed through evacuated works of the enemy, crossing Nickajack Creek; marched five or six miles and halted three miles north of Chattahoochee River, in sight of Atlanta. July 6, changed from the right center to the left, relieving portion of the Fourteenth Corps, and forming on the right, until July 17, when we crossed Chattahoochee River at Pace's Ferry, proceeding in a southeasterly direction about seven miles. July 18, at daybreak this morning I was ordered to take my regiment and Eighty-second Ohio and proceed on a road indicated as going north, to find the right of the Fourth Corps, and connect with it. No road led north, but I followed the road leading east and formed a junction with Fourth Corps, which was moving on the road to Buck Head and near Nancy's Creek. My regiment and Eighty-second Ohio were deployed as skirmishers, with reserves, and moved forward on the right of the Fourth Corps, driving in the enemy's vedettes, crossing Nancy's Creek, and seizing a ridge beyond, after a smart skirmish with the enemy, in which I had l wounded and 10 missing. The loss of the enemy was 1 officer (adjutant-general) killed and 23 enlisted men killed and wounded. The force engaged was Williams' brigade of rebel Kentucky cavalry and two pieces of artillery. They were driven off. By direction of General Williams I returned to the brigade, the Fourth Corps advancing to and beyond the point taken. July 19, marched three miles south to Peach Tree Creek. <ar73_72>

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                                                            E. A. CARMAN,
                                                                    Colonel, Comdg. Thirteenth Regt. New Jersey Vols.

                                                            Lieut. E.G. FAY,
                                                                    A. A. A. G., 2d Brig., 1st Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 196.--Report of Col. Horace Boughton, One hundred and forty-third New York Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations July 24-September 8.

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[ar73_92 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,
                                                            Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the field movements and operations of this brigade during the campaign terminating in the capture and occupation of Atlanta:
        In obedience to a special field order from Brig. Gen. A. S. Williams, commanding First Division, I assumed command of this brigade on the 24th day of July last. From the commencement of the campaign, viz, May 2, 1864, at which date the brigade marched from Bridgeport, Ala., on its way to the front, down to the time of my assignment to the command, the brigade was commanded by Col. James S. Robinson, of the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers. <ar73_93> He having already submitted an official report of the operations of the brigade during the period of his command, I shall confine this report to those matters which occurred subsequently and during the time of my own command.

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        At this point it connected with the left flank of Knipe's brigade. The regiments were disposed in the following order from right to left: First, two companies of the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers; second, Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers; third, One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers: fourth, Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers; fifth, One hundred and forty-third. New York Volunteers; sixth, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers. The left of the last-named regiment connected with the right of Ireland's brigade, of the Second Division. The Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, except the portion already named, being deployed, formed a second line a few yards in the rear of the main line just described. On that portion of the line occupied by the One hundred and first Illinois and Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers were stationed the six pieces of Winegar's battery, and on the line of the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers were stationed two pieces of Bundy's battery. All these guns occupied re-vetted embrasures in the breast-works. The line extended along the crest of a ridge under close range of the rebel artillery, which swept the entire position. Directly in front the enemy had at least two strongly-built forts and a number of redoubts and other smaller works. His line was also covered by a strong breast-work, in front of which he had constructed three lines of formidable abatis and chevaux-de-frise and a wooden palisade. One of the forts above named was rendered useless for artillery, owing to the accurate and pertinacious fire of the pickets, which prevented the artillerymen from working their guns.

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        Many of the enemy's shot penetrated the breast-works, while others skimmed closely over its parapet, one carrying away the banner of the Eighty-second Ohio and tearing it to shreds. Early on the morning of the 19th this unprovoked cannonade was returned with interest by the Union batteries along the entire front. From this time forward there was but little musketry firing along my line. Excepting the bombardment of the city by the artillery, hostilities almost entirely ceased.

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        Here the troops awaited the passage of the Fourth Army Corps, which was not completed until after midnight. At about 1 o'clock in the morning the column resumed its march, and shortly before daybreak arrived in position near Montgomery's Ferry. The troops were formed in line of bat-tie in the following order, from right to left: First, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers; second, One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers; third, Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers; fourth, One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers; fifth, Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers; sixth, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers. The space thus covered by the brigade was about one mile in length, the right resting on the Marietta road, and the left stretching across Peach Tree Creek. The Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers was posted on a hill bordering the right bank of the creek, and the <ar73_95> Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers on an opposite hill on the left bank, adjoining Moore's Mill. These two regiments were considerably detached from the remainder of the brigade; there was also a considerable vacancy in the line between the right of the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers and the left flank of the First Brigade. As soon as the troops were well in position they were put vigorously to work in intrenching the line and slashing the timber in front; this work was actively continued on down to the 31st. The sixteen pieces of artillery posted along the line of the brigade were well protected by earth-works, and the intrenchments and abatis were extended along the entire front.

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        Early on the following morning a regiment being required from my command to join in a reconnaissance about to be made to the front, I dispatched the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers. At noon of the same day the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers joined another party sent out on a similar mission. These two regiments entered the city of Atlanta, which, upon their arrival, was found to have been just evacuated by the enemy's rear guard. They did not return to the brigade, but awaited its arrival. At 5 p.m. the First and Second Brigades marched to the city, and mine remained to guard the railroad and wagon bridges over the Chattahoochee. I immediately transferred the Eighty-second Illinois and a battalion of the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers to the right of the line to guard that portion of it which had been evacuated by the other two brigades.
        The Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers was stationed on the extreme right in support of a 20-pounder battery on the height near the railroad bridge. No further change was made in the disposition of the troops of my brigade until the 4th instant, when, by direction of General Williams, commanding division, I marched my command to Atlanta. A regiment of Colonel Harrison's brigade, of the Third Division, relieved my troops on the south side of the river. Leaving Montgomery's Ferry at 8 my brigade arrived at Atlanta at 11 a.m. and went into position in the enemy's works on the eastern side <ar73_96> of the city. In this new position my regiments were arranged as follows, from right to left: First, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers; second, One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers; third, Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers; fourth, Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers; fifth. One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers; sixth, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers. The right of my line connected with the left of Knipe's brigade, while my left covered the Buck Head road.
        I take pleasure in saying that during the brief period of my command the officers and men of this brigade, including the officers of my staff, have displayed commendable zeal and alacrity in the fulfillment of all their duties; in camp, on the march, and before the enemy, all have displayed that patriotic and self-sacrificing devotion which characterizes true soldiers and genuine lovers of our country and its cause.
        Respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            HORACE BOUGHTON,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding.

                                                            Capt. S. E. PITTMAN,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, Twentieth Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 199.--Report of Col. Horace Boughton, One hundred and forty-third New York Infantry, of operations May 1-July 24.

...

        In pursuance of orders, I immediately moved my regiment forward with a view to connect with the Second Division, which was on my left and in advance. Before this connection was formed the enemy had Succeeded in forcing the right of Colonel Ireland's brigade, of the <ar73_107> Second Division (which was the extreme right of that division), from its position, and it fell back to the rear of my line, leaving my left flank exposed. The Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, which was on my right, did not advance so far as I had done, and I discovered that my right was also unprotected. At this time the enemy's fire was very heavy, and in his pursuit of Colonel Ireland's brigade he came on confidently, approaching to within twenty yards of my line, which was in dense woods, when I gave orders to open fire, which was done with such precision and effect as to temporarily check his advance.

...

                                                            HORACE BOUGHTON,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding.

                                                            Capt. A. E. LEE,
                                                                    A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 1st Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 217.--Report of Col. Ario Pardee, jr., One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations May 1-August 4.

...

        At 9 a.m. May 13 we left the bivouac of the preceding night and marched to a point near Resaca and, with the brigade, formed in line covering the main road leading from Dalton to Resaca. The night was spent in constructing a line of works, connecting on the right with the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and on the left with the One hundred and eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. In this position we remained until 4 p.m. of the 14th instant, when the regiment was assigned the right of the brigade and marched toward the left of the Fourth Corps. After reaching the position designated I was ordered to throw up a line of protecting works of logs, connecting on my right with those of the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and on my left with the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A strong line of skirmishers was thrown forward, connecting with those of the regiments on my right and left. There was no picket-firing during the night.

...

                                                            ARIO PARDEE,
                                                                    JR., Colonel 147th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, Comdg.

                                                            Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,
                                                                    A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 244.--Report of Col. William Rickards, jr., Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations May 3-June 15.

...

        May 25, marched at 7 a.m.; crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek on bridge; the rebels had fired it, but they were driven away and the fire was extinguished. At 10 a.m. the Fifth Ohio skirmishers met those of the enemy, and a brisk fight took place. Our division was alone, far in advance. It being evident that the enemy were in force, measures were taken to hold our position until other troops arrived. At 4.30 p.m. Generals Butterfield's and Williams' divisions came up and charged the enemy. At 6 p.m. our brigade was ordered to advance. We moved forward in two lines, Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers on right of first line; relieved the Eighty-second Ohio and One hundred and first Illinois. It being dusk, we could only fire at the flashes of the enemy, their breast-works being within short range. The regiment <ar73_310> was in excellent order, my right resting on Dallas road. We were ordered to lay on our arms and hold our position.

...

                                                            WM. RICKARDS, JR.,
                                                                    Colonel, Comdg. Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Vet. Vols.

                                                            Capt. S. B. WHEELOCK,
                                                                    A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIV [S# 92]
NOVEMBER 15-DECEMBER 21, 1864.--The Savannah (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 79.--Report of Surg. Henry Z. Gill, U S. Army, Surgeon-in-Chief.

...

        The Twentieth Corps formed the right of the Left Wing of the Army of Georgia. The division was commanded by Brig. Gen. N. J. Jackson, and was composed of three brigades, commanded respectively by--First Brigade (four regiments), Col. J. L. Selfridge, Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers; Second Brigade (five regiments), Col. E. A. Carman, Thirteenth New Jersey Volunteers; Third Brigade (six regiments), Col. J. S. Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers, giving a total present strength of 5,829. (See Appendix, Table I.(*)) The men were generally in good condition, having had for some weeks the advantage of foraging expeditions, and were well clothed before leaving Atlanta, having received issues of new clothing. There were in the command about 300 recruits. The transportation of the division comprised 177 six-mule army wagons, thirty-eight of which carried ammunition.

...

                                                            H. Z. GILL,
                                                                    Surgeon, U.S. Volunteers, Chief First Div., 20th Army Corps.

                                                            Brig. Gen. J. K. BARNES,
                                                                    Surgeon. General, U.S. Army.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIV [S# 92]
NOVEMBER 15-DECEMBER 21, 1864.--The Savannah (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 93.--Report of Lieut. Col. John B. Le Sage, One hundred and first Illinois Infantry, of operations September 2-December 23.

...

        On the 15th of October the regiment went with the brigade on a foraging expedition to Flat Shoals, on which expedition the regiment was gone four days and loaded thirty-two wagons with forage. Again, on the 26th of October, the regiment went with the brigade on a foraging expedition to Berkshire Post-Office, remaining four days, and, in conjunction <ar92_262> with the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, loading sixty wagons with forage. During the remainder of the time until the commencement of the recent expedition the regiment remained quietly in camp.

...

                                                            JOHN B. LE SAGE,
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. 101st Regiment Illinois Volunteers.

                                                            Capt. A. E. LEE,
                                                                    Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 1st Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIV [S# 92]
NOVEMBER 15-DECEMBER 21, 1864.--The Savannah (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 142.--Report of Capt. Thomas S. Sloan, Battery E, Pennsylvania Light Artillery, of operations September 2-December 26.

...

[ar92_360 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. INDPT. BATTERY E, PENNSYLVANIA ARTILLERY,
                                                            Savannah, Ga., December 26, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of this battery from the occupation of Atlanta, September 2, 1864, until the present time:
        From the occupation of the city until November 15 the battery was parked with other batteries of the corps in the northeastern part of the city, with the exception of two weeks immediately succeeding its capture, when we were stationed in the works on East Point Railroad. Battery took part in foraging expedition under Colonel Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, October 16, going as far as Flat Rock Shoals on South River. In the expedition were probably 600 wagons, which were all filled with corn and fodder. One section of battery accompanied another expedition, under General Geary, October 26, proceeding in direction of Lithonia, on Georgia railroad. From these and other expeditions from Atlanta, we received in all about 7,000 <ar92_361> pounds of corn for the animals of the battery. We moved from Atlanta November 15, taking the Augusta road. One man died of disease November 18 near Madison. From this date until arriving in front of Savannah December 10 nothing worthy of note in a report transpired. December 13, nineteen rounds of ammunition were expended, mostly thrown into the city. Twenty rounds were fired on the 20th at a boat which had moved up from the city and was annoying our troops on Hutchinson's Island. Battery moved into Savannah December 21. One hundred and twenty rounds were expended on morning of 21st in endeavoring to drive off the enemy from a boat on the river, from which they were unloading supplies. On afternoon of same day battery was moved to West Broad street, where it is now parked.

...

                                                            THOS. S. SLOAN,
                                                                    Captain Independent Battery E, Pennsylvania Artillery.

                                                            Lieut. W. H. MICKLE,
                                                                    Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Arty. Brig., Twentieth Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM NOVEMBER 14 TO NOVEMBER 30, 1864.(*)--#7

...

XXXIII. The following named regiments are hereby assigned to the Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and will report direct to Maj. Gen. L. H. Rousseau, commanding: Eleventh Minnesota Volunteers, One hundred and seventy-fifth and One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteers, Forty-third Wisconsin Volunteers, Twenty-ninth Michigan Volunteers.

* * * * * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Thomas:

                                                            SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,
                                                                    Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#2

...

V. The One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteers is hereby assigned to the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and will relieve the One hundred and seventy-third Ohio Volunteers from duty with Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Upon being relieved, the One hundred and seventy-third Ohio Infantry will report to Major-General Rousseau for assignment to duty in that division.

* * * * * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Thomas:

                                                            HENRY M. CIST,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 4.--Itinerary of the Union Forces, January 1-June 30, 1865.(*)

...

        January 1.--The brigade was at this time encamped in the suburbs and on the northern side of the city of Savannah, Ga. The troops occupied substantial winter camps and were chiefly employed in their usual drills and in building fortifications around the city. A daily detail was also furnished by the brigade for cutting timber to be used in corduroying the road across Hutchinson's Island. No marked event occurred until the 14th, when Colonel Robinson, of the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, received official information of his appointment by the President as brigadier.general of U.S. Volunteers.

...

        April 9.--Eighty-second and Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers consolidated into one regiment, to be known as the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers.

...


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 131.--Report of Maj. Gen. Joseph A. Mower, U.S. Army, commanding Twentieth Army Corps, of operations April 3-June 13.

...

        On the 4th of June the following regiments were transferred by Special Orders, No. 84, headquarters Army of Georgia, to the Fourteenth Corps: Third Wisconsin Volunteers, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, Fifth Ohio Volunteers, Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers, Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, Thirty-third Indiana Volunteers; and on the 5th of June the following regiments were transferred by General Orders, No. 16, current series, from headquarters Twentieth Corps to Major-General Augur's command: Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, Fifth Connecticut Veteran Volunteers, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, Second Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers, One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, <ar98_597> Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, Sixtieth New York Veteran Volunteers, One hundred and second New York Veteran Volunteers. The balance of the troops coming within the provisions of General Orders, No. 94, War Department, 1865, were mustered out of the service, the muster being completed on the 13th of June.

...

                                                            JOS. A. MOWER,
                                                                    Major-general of Volunteers, Commanding Corps.

                                                            Lieut. Col. T. S. BOWERS,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 132.--Report of Brig. Gen. Nathaniel J. Jackson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations January 17-March 24.

...

        On the morning of the 17th it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated his position, retreating by the way of Averasborough. Much delay--occurred in crossing Black River and the command did not cross until the 18th, and then pushed for Cox's Bridge, making, however, very little progress, as we were obliged to corduroy almost the entire distance marched. March 19, the command marched at 7 a.m. toward Cox's Bridge, in rear of the Fourteenth Corps, arriving about 1l o'clock at the Smithfield Cross-Roads, where we left two regiments, the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers from the First Brigade, and One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, from the Third Brigade, to be relieved by General Ward's division. The command was ordered to leave the trains and push forward to the assistance of the Fourteenth Corps, who were actively engaged with the enemy. The One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers was detached and posted on a cross-road leading toward Smithfield, by order of the corps commander. On arrival at the scene of action General Robinson's brigade was placed in position on the left of the Cox's Bridge road, with three regiments (Sixty-first Ohio, Thirty-first Wisconsin, and Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers) in the front line, and two regiments (Eighty-second Illinois and One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers) in the second line. Brevet Brigadier-General Buell's brigade, of the Fourteenth Corps, being on General Robinson's left and another brigade on his right, Colonel Hawley's brigade was massed in the open field on the left of the road, about half a mile in rear of General Robinson's line.

...

        Third Brigade, Brig. Gen. James S. Robinson commanding: Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Lieut. Col. D. Thomson; Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. E. S. Salomon; One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. John B. Le Sage; Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. F. H. West; Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Capt. John Garrett; One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, Lieut. Col. H. Watkins.

...

                                                            N. J. JACKSON,
                                                                    Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

                                                            Lieut. Col. H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General, Twentieth Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 147.--Report of Brig. Gen. James S. Robinson, U. S. Army, commanding Third Brigade, of operations January 17-March 24.

...

<ar98_659>

                                                            HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,
                                                            Near Goldsborough, N. C., March 27, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the services of this brigade during the late campaign:
        On the 17th of January last my command crossed the Savannah River opposite Savannah, Ga. The brigade consisted at this time of six regiments as follows: Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, Col. F. H. West; Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Lieut. Col. D. Thomson; One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, Lieut. Col. H. Watkins; One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. J. B. Le Sage; Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, Maj. F. H. Rolshausen, and Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Capt. John Garrett. The regiment last named was at this time detached for special duty in the quartermaster's department at the headquarters of the Military Division of the Mississippi. It did not rejoin the command until the 10th of February. My brigade encamped during the night of the 17th about four miles beyond Screven's Ferry. Here it remained until 2 p.m. of the 18th, when its march was resumed. At 5 p.m. my command encamped on Garnett's plantation, four miles below Hardeeville.

...

        On the 15th 148 wagons of the train were assigned to the care of my brigade. The regiments were distributed through the train and directed to be unusually watchful against attacks from the enemy's cavalry. The column moved on the Lexington road. At 2 p.m. seven prisoners were brought in by foragers from the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers. At 3 p.m. the brigade reached Congaree Creek, the bridge over which had been burned by the enemy. While the column awaited the repair of the bridge, a squad of five foragers from the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers brought in eleven good horses with complete equipments, all of which they had captured from a detachment of rebel cavalry. Twelve horses were taken, but one being severely wounded had to be abandoned. My brigade crossed Congaree Creek at 6 p.m. The road beyond contained many boggy places, which retarded the march very much. My advance regiment did not get into camp until 10 p.m. At that hour the head of column reached the crossroads near Red Branch Creek.

...

        At 5.30 p.m. my brigade encamped near the Broad River, about one mile below Alston Depot. Foragers from the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers captured on this day 2 horses and 15 mules. The party from the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers captured 8 mules and burned 1 cotton-gin and 23 bales of cotton. At 9 a.m. on the 20th my brigade crossed Broad River. The column then moved northeastward, and at 11 a.m. crossed Little River at Gibson's. The country now became quite undulating, and we seemed to have gotten fairly out of the swamps. There were many well-stocked <ar98_662> plantations, and our foragers brought us in a plentiful supply of provisions. At 3 p.m. the column struck the direct road to Winnsborough. At 4 p.m. the troops encamped at Myrtle Hill. The march was resumed at 9 a.m. on the 21st. My brigade was put in charge of 420 wagons. The column moved through a line, undulating country toward Winnsborough.

...

        Lieut. Col. D. Thomson, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, severely wounded; Lieut. Col. H. Watkins, One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, contusion in right leg; Maj. John Higgins, One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, severely wounded; Capt. George Heinzmann, Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, severely wounded; First Lieut. R. M. J. Hardenburgh, One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, mortally wounded, since dead; Lieut. Edwin E. Cummings, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, thumb shot off; Second Lieut. William Brant, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, severely wounded in arm.

...

        The Fourteenth Corps had become considerably engaged. I was directed to move my command immediately to the front and fill up a gap in the line of Carlin's division. I complied with this order at once, and formed my regiments in two lines, three being on the front and two in reserve. The former were the Sixty-first and Eighty-second Ohio Veteran and the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, and the latter were the Eighty-second Illinois and One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers. As soon as my line was formed it began the construction of a breast-work covering its front.

...

        I sincerely regret to record the loss in this affair of Capt. William Ballentine, of the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, who was mortally wounded, and has since died. He was a young officer of great promise, and his loss cannot be easily repaired.

...

        The following additional officers were wounded in the engagement: Capt. Robert Patterson, Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, slightly, and Lieut. William H. Thomson, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, severely.

...

                                                            J. S. ROBINSON,
                                                                    Brigadier-General.

                                                            Capt. E. K. BUTTRICK,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 153.--Reports of Col. Francis H. West, Thirty-first Wisconsin Infantry, of operations January 18-March 24 and April 10-May 27.

...

        Leaving here on the 17th we arrived at noon on the 19th near Bentonville, where we found the Fourteenth Corps hotly pressed by the whole combined force of the enemy. Our brigade being in advance General Robinson at once moved my regiment, together with the Sixty-first and Eighty-second Ohio, into position in a gap left in the lines of the Fourteenth Corps, we being immediately to the left of the main road, which seemed to be the key to our whole position. We were scarcely in line before the brigades of the Fourteenth Corps that were on our left fell back precipitately, leaving the rebel columns to pass entirely past our left, which made it necessary for us to retire a short distance and change front at the same time, which we did under very heavy fire, General Robinson himself carrying the brigade colors and leading us rapidly into position so as to again face the enemy's front, when we were furiously assailed by the enemy repeatedly until dark, our men steadily repulsing them at every assault, when under the cover of darkness they abandoned the field.

...

                                                            F. H. WEST,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Capt. ALFRED E. LEE,
                                                                    Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Brig., First Div., 20th Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWESTERN VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, NORTHERN AND CENTRAL GEORGIA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND WEST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 15, 1865.(*)--#7

...

                                                            HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,
                                                            Nashville, Tenn., February 20, 1865.

* * * * * * * * * *

XIV. The One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry is hereby relieved from duty with the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps, but will remain on engineering duty in accordance with previous orders. All reports and returns called for by existing orders and regulations will be made to Brig. Gen. John F. Miller, commanding post of Nashville, Tenn.

XV. The Forty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry is hereby assigned to the Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and will report to Col. E. C. Mason, One hundred and seventy-sixth Ohio Infantry, commanding, for duty.
        By command of Major-General Thomas:

                                                            HENRY M. CIST,
                                                                    Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.(*)--#32

...

        Hyde Ferry, Fort Garesche.--As Fort Gillem is nearly one mile and three-quarters distant from the Cumberland River, it became necessary to close this space by one strong redoubt, at least. Having therefore obtained from the commanding general the aid of the One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteers November last, they were set at work building a strong redoubt on the knoll crossed by the Hyde Ferry road about three-quarters of a mile distant from the ferry and one mile north of Fort Gillem. This position had a good command over the approaches in every direction. Rapid progress was made, so that the fort was prepared to mount a battery at the time of the battles of Nashville. The regiment was called upon to do military duty after the battles, resuming labor upon the work in strength about the middle of January. The ditches and parapet have been finished, and the latter mostly sodded; three magazines, serving as traverses, completed and also sodded. Gabion embrasures have been formed for fourteen guns and twelve platforms laid. The large block-house keep with flanking redans is set up and covered with timber. This covering, after being made waterproof, will be loaded with its parapet. The gateway has yet to be completed. This fort when finished will be very strong and a good specimen of polygonal redoubts. Its angles are made open so that the guns of the faces fire parallel to the capitals. It should be garrisoned and preserved. Were the scarps revetted it would be easily kept in order. <ar104_779>

...

        The interior line, while serving as a reserve to the exterior, would enable the usual garrison of Nashville, aided by the quartermaster employes, to hold the city against ordinary attacks from large raiding parties, under such generals as Forrest and Wheeler. Had the war continued it was my intention to put a redoubt on Hill 210 and support the two batteries to the left by block-houses. The battery at the Taylor barn would have been converted into a redoubt with a block-house keep. One small block-house between Morton and the Taylor house, and two between Negley and the reservoir would have completed the line of defense, and made it amply secure. These block-houses have all been prepared by a detachment of the One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteers from timber cut down in the vicinity of Johnsonville. The spring floods destroyed the bridges on the Northwestern Road, and prevented the transportation of this material to the city. It is useless now to build these structures. As Nashville will probably have a garrison for one year at least, if not for a much longer period, I propose to complete Forts Morton, Houston, Gillem, and Hyde Ferry, almost finished, by the aid of soldiers. Negley and Donaldson are finished. Captain Burroughs, U.S. Corps of Engineers, up to October, 1864, had charge of the works around Nashville, mostly under the direction of General Morton. Major Willett, then lieutenant, also assisted General Morton, and built the magazine. Colonel Merrill gave little attention to the defenses of this depot, being principally occupied with those at Chattanooga.

...

                                                            Z. B. TOWER,
                                                                    Brig. Gen. and Insp. Gen. of Fortifications, Mil. Div. of the Miss.