82nd Ohio Infantry Volunteers 
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 241.--Report of Lieut. Col. William G. Le Due, Chief Quartermaster, Eleventh Army Corps.
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                                                            OFFICE OF CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, 11TH ARMY CORPS,
                                                            In Camp, near Brooke's Station, May 8, 1863.

GENERAL: By your order of April 28, conveyed through Capt. F. A. Dessauer, I parked the trains of the Eleventh Corps at the junction of the Berea and Hartwood roads. Supplies for troops and trains were drawn from Stoneman's Switch, and kept constantly on hand and forwarded according to your orders. At no time was there less than five days' forage on hand to send forward for issue.
        On the 29th of April, 1 caused to be arrested one Bensinger, a sutler (of the Eighty-second Ohio, I believe), for selling whisky in camp, and found him guilty, and fined him $100, and to be driven from the camp. Also, a teamster was found guilty of making a row by bringing into camp (from Stoneman's Switch) and selling one canteen of whisky. He was fined $30.
        The provost-guard of convalescents, under the very efficient supervision of Lieutenant [Dominicus] Klutsch, were extremely useful to me in maintaining order, guarding the ammunition trains, performing picket duty, arresting stragglers, and aiding and assisting the wounded who were able to travel or were brought to the camp in wagons. Four hundred and seventy-nine wounded and sick from the front were fed and forwarded to the hospital--216 on foot and 263 by ambulances and spring wagons. Eighty-four stragglers were arrested, 34 of whom were sent to the provost-marshal-general, at Falmouth; 30 were sent back to their regiments; 20 were kept in custody. Fifty-eight musicians were sent to the hospital to nurse the sick and wounded.
        On the 6th, at 3 a.m., having received your order, I broke camp, and marched by way of Stoneman's Switch to the old headquarters near Brooke's Station, about dark of the 6th. The transportation of the corps is ready for service. A few mules have been lost and some horses, but not enough to materially interfere with active and efficient operations.
    Respectfully submitted.

                                                            WM. G. LE DUC,
                                                                    Lieu tenant- Colonel and Chief Quartermaster, 11th Army Corps.

                                                            Major-General HOWARD.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 261. -- Report of Lieut. Col. David Thomson,
Eighty-second Ohio Infantry.
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                                                            NEAR WARRENTON JUNCTION, VA.,
                                                            August 21, 1863.

SIR: In compliance with your order, I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this regiment at the battle of Gettysburg, and from that time to July 25, the date of our encampment near Warrenton Junction, Va.:
        On July 1 last, this regiment, numbering 312 men present for duty, under the command of Col. James S. Robinson, and forming part of the Second Brigade, was assigned a position on the left of that brigade during the battle of that day, in the north of the town. By command of Colonel Robinson, the regiment fell back through Gettysburg with the remainder of the forces of the Third Division. Upon entering the town, Colonel Robinson was severely wounded, when I took command of the regiment. On arriving on the ground in front of the cemetery building, I was ordered to take a position near. I placed the regiment west of and near that building, where I remained during that day and until the evening of July 5, when we left Gettysburg, and marched with the Second Brigade until we arrived near Hagerstown, Md., on July 11, the regiment then numbering 220 present for duty.
        During the battle, the regiment lost 4 officers killed, 2 mortally wounded (since died), 12 wounded, and 2 taken prisoners. Total loss of officers, 20. The loss in enlisted men was 13 killed, 10 mortally wounded, 61 wounded, and 77 missing. Total loss of enlisted men, 161.
        The regiment remained near Hagerstown, Md., until July 14, when it was transferred to the First Brigade, under your command. Since then we have marched with the First Brigade from Hagerstown, Md., to Warrenton Junction, Va., where we arrived July 25, near 5 p.m. The strength of the regiment upon its arrival at the latter place was 224 present for duty.
        I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            D. THOMSON,
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Brigadier-General TYNDALE,
                                                                    Comdg. First Brigade, Third Division, Eleventh Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]
MARCH 28, 1864.--Scouts to Caperton's Ferry, Ala.
Report of Col. James S. Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry, commanding brigade.
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                                                            HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., THIRD DIV., ELEVENTH CORPS,
                                                            March 28, 1864.

CAPTAIN: A patrol from the First Alabama Cavalry, which returned at 5 p.m. on yesterday, reported themselves to have been driven back from Caperton's Ferry to Island Creek by a detachment of about 50 rebel cavalry. They declared that they exchanged shots with scattering bushwhackers near the house of one Caperton, adjoining the ferry, and that the enemy suddenly afterward appeared in such numbers as to compel the retreat of the cavalry.
        Upon receipt of this news I immediately dispatched a detachment of 10 men and a lieutenant of the Second Kentucky Cavalry, with orders to patrol the road as far as Island Creek and farther, 'if found to be safe, and to return about daylight. This patrol returned at 7 a.m. this morning. The lieutenant commanding reported that he went as far as within 4 miles of Caperton's Ferry without seeing the enemy, and that he could not learn that they had been in the vicinity during the previous day, thus partly contradicting the story of the Alabama cavalry patrol.
        At 9 a.m. this morning I sent out a second detachment from the Second Kentucky Cavalry, with orders to go as far as Caperton's Ferry (if found to be safe) and ascertain the truth as to the presence of the enemy in that vicinity. I had also previous to that hour sent a mounted patrol from the First Alabama Cavalry to scour the country and co-operate with an infantry patrol from the One hundred and first Illinois.
        At 12.30 p.m. cannonading was heard down the river, which I finally ascertained to be one of Brigadier-General Geary's batteries shelling a small party of 4 or 5 of the seen from that side of enemy the river below the point of the island. The cannonading continued at intervals for half an hour.
        I have sent out a reconnoitering party of six companies, 125 men, under Lieut. Col. D. Thomson, of the Eighty-second Ohio, with orders to ascertain the truth with reference to the various and contradicting rumors which have been received.
        I respectfully request authority to send a strong detachment of infantry to Caperton's Ferry to-morrow, having had information from various sources that the enemy has a picket at that point.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            J. S. ROBINSON,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

                                                            Capt. EUGENE WIEGEL,
                                                                    A. A. G.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 195.--Report of Col. James S. Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations May 1-July 24.
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                                                            HDQRS. THIRD BRIGADE, FIRST DIVISION, 20TH CORPS,
                                                            Near Atlanta, Ga., July 24, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the field movements and operations of my command since the 1st of May, 1864:
        On the 2d day of the month just named the command of this brigade devolved upon me from the hands of Brigadier-General Tyndale, <ar73_85> who had received a leave of absence on account of illness. On the same date the brigade marched from Bridgeport, Ala., where it was then stationed, to join the remainder of the division at White-side's, Tenn. The latter point was reached during the ensuing evening, and the brigade for the first time met its associate brigades of the new organization, known as the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps. The brigade, as at that time organized, consisted of the following regiments: Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, commanded by Col. Stephen J. McGroarty; Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Lieut. Col. David Thomson; One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, Col. Horace Boughton; Forty-fifth New York Veteran Volunteers, Col. Adolphus Dobke; One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. John B. Le Sage; Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Edward S. Salomon. The march was continued from Whiteside's on the 3d, and was pursued without being marked by any event especially important until the arrival of my command with the remainder of the division at Trickum Post-Office, on the East Chickamauga, May 7. Here the brigade was rejoined by the Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, which regiment had been absent on veteran furlough since the 13th of March, 1864. The command marched again from the Trickum Post-Office at midnight of the 10th, and arrived at Sugar Valley, at the mouth of Snake Creek Gap, on the 12th. On the 13th the command was pushed forward toward Resaca, and during the afternoon formed line of battle and assisted in building a line of intrenchments near Camp Creek. On the 14th the position was shifted one mile farther to the left, where the entire division was held in reserve of the division of General Butterfield until 4.30 p.m. At that hour I was directed by the brigadier-general commanding division to move my brigade by the left flank and lead the division in marching toward the Dalton road, near which at that time the Fourth Corps was engaging the enemy. By 6.30 p.m. the head of my column reached a high wooded ridge, overlooking a narrow open valley, along which extended the main road leading to Dalton. On the farther side of the valley was another thickly wooded hill, and upon a slight knoll in the open field at our feet stood the Fifth Indiana Battery, supported by a portion of Stanley's division, of the Fourth Corps. The division itself was at that time engaging the enemy some distance beyond the farther end of the valley, and from the character of the firing it was evident that General Stanley's lines were falling back; in fact that they were giving way in some disorder. By direction of General Williams I immediately formed my brigade in line of battle along the crest of the ridge parallel to and overlooking the valley. I had four regiments in front and two in rear, thus forming two lines, one in support of the other. In my first line were the One hundred and first Illinois, Eighty-second Illinois, and the One hundred and forty-third and Forty-fifth New York Volunteers, and in the second the Sixty-first and Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers. I had hardly gotten my command into position until the enemy swarmed out of the woods in pursuit of Stanley's men, and with defiant yells made for the battery, the infantry support of which immediately fled. The enemy came confidently on, apparently unaware of our presence. He was rapidly nearing the battery, when I was directed by the brigadier-general commanding division to precipitate my entire command into the valley, and, wheeling it upon the right flank, bring it up to the support <ar73_86> of the battery. This order was at once communicated to the regiments of my brigade, and in a moment the whole was in motion. The evolution was executed with enthusiasm and with no less precision and regularity of movement than might have been expected upon drill. Arriving at the front of the battery the Eighty-second Illinois, Sixty-first Ohio, and One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers poured a tremendous fire upon the overconfident foe. The One hundred and first Illinois was directed to move at once upon the hill on the left, now in possession of the enemy. That gallant regiment at once advanced in perfect order to the crest and drove from it the enemy's skirmishers. Meeting with such severe and unexpected resistance, the enemy at once gave way and confusedly sought his intrenchments back in the woods. The troops now bivouacked in line of battle, and remained in the position thus taken up until 12 m. of the following day. At that time I was directed by General Williams to march my brigade, following that of Brigadier-General Ruger, down the Dalton road. After proceeding about half a mile, and having entered the dense forest covering the enemy's position, I was ordered by the brigadier-general commanding division to form my brigade on the left of the road in line of battle, the regiments being in column. Butterfield's and Geary's divisions had already actively engaged the enemy, and the firing upon my right had grown severe. Upon further consultation with General Williams, I moved my brigade to the crest of the hill in front of the line then occupied, and directly afterward moved my command forward half a mile and placed it in position on the left of General Ruger's brigade, and upon the left flank of the division, and in fact the left flank of the army. My brigade was formed in two lines, the One hundred and first Illinois and the One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, deployed, composing the first, and the Sixty-first Ohio, Eighty-second Ohio, Forty-fifth New York, and Eighty-second Illinois the second line, supporting the two regiments of General Ruger's brigade, and the two regiments of my own brigade deployed in the front line. My first line rested along the base of a slight declivity. Shortly after my brigade was thus formed, I was directed by General Williams to send a regiment to support the battery of Captain Woodbury, which had been placed in position upon a wooded hill some distance to the rear. I immediately dispatched the Forty-fifth New York Veteran Volunteers, which regiment remained with the battery until the morning of the 16th. At about 5 p.m. the enemy was discovered to be massing his troops in the forest that skirted the farther side of the open field in my front. I immediately moved the Eighty-second Ohio to the crest of the slope, and stationed it behind the breast-works immediately in rear and support of the One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers, of Ruger's brigade. The One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers was then deployed and formed in continuation of the line on the left of the One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers. The One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers was next deployed and formed on the left of the One hundred and first Illinois. The two latter regiments were unsheltered by any species of breast-works or other obstacle to the fire of the enemy. The dispositions just described had been hardly made until the enemy boldly emerged from the woods and began the attack. He at once opened a heavy fire of musketry, which was repaid with interest. He had not advanced far into the open field <ar73_87> until his progress was checked by the sweeping fire which was poured upon him. In about twenty minutes his lines, broken and confused, withdrew to the woods, and the firing ceased. The Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers was now deployed and placed in the position previously occupied by the One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers, which regiment was relieved. The Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers was also deployed and kept in hand ready to strengthen whatever might prove to be the weakest point. These dispositions were no sooner made than the enemy again advanced to the attack. He came forward with a reckless desperation, which indicated a determination to break our line at every hazard. But his rash purposes were doomed to the same signal failure as before. He approached in heavy and well sustained force within seventy-five yards of my line, when the fire of musketry became so destructive that he again hastily withdrew, leaving dead and wounded, hundreds of small-arms, and about 20 prisoners in our hands. It was now 6.30 p.m. No further attack was made upon my lines during the evening or night. On the ensuing morning, it being discovered that the enemy had withdrawn, I sent out my pioneer corps to bury the dead of the enemy in front of my line. The officer in charge of the corps afterward reported that he buried 85 dead rebels, including 5 commissioned officers, in front of the brigade. The march in pursuit of the retreating enemy was begun at 9 a.m. on the morning of the 16th. My command crossed the Connesauga River above Resaca at 1 p.m., and encamped on the right bank of the Coosawattee at 6 p.m. The march was pursued on the 17th as far as to a point four miles east of Calhoun. On the 18th the brigade resumed its march, and arrived at 9.30 p.m. at a point near Spring Mills, and six miles east of Adairsville. At 1 p.m. on the 19th the march was continued as far as Two-Run Creek. Here the enemy's cavalry and flankers were encountered at 4 p.m., and the brigade was immediately formed in battle order. By direction of General Williams, and under the personal superintendence of Lieutenant-Colonel Asmussen, of General Hooker's staff, I advanced my brigade in two lines, one in support of the other, at 5 p.m. The troops moved steadily forward over steep hills and through tangled forests and marshes, compelling the enemy to remove his light artillery and cavalry and fall back upon his infantry supports. The latter were encountered in strong force near the village of Cassville just at dusk. My command closed up well upon the enemy and threw up a breastwork under cover of the darkness. The rebel forces withdrew during the night, and on the following day I encamped my brigade in the suburbs of Cassville.
        On the 23d of May active operations were resumed, the brief repose permitted to the army having expired. My command marched from Cassville at 5 a.m., and at 2 p.m. crossed the Etowah River near Euharlee Mills. On the 24th the brigade marched by mountain paths and by-ways to Burnt Hickory, where it encamped at 4 p.m. On the morning of the 25th the Forty-fifth New York Volunteers, was, by order of General Williams, detached from the brigade to guard the division ammunition train. (This regiment remained thus detached until June 28, and, therefore, participated in none of the subsequent operations and engagements of the brigade up to the latter date.) At 6 a.m. my command marched from Burnt Hickory and crossed the Pumpkin Vine Creek about noon. Shortly after passing this stream, and while the column was marching on the <ar73_88> main road to Dallas, and was about three miles distant from that place, I was suddenly ordered by General Williams to face my command about and march it to the relief of General Geary's division, which, I was informed, had encountered the enemy. I quickly reversed the direction of the march, and my brigade, having been the rear of the division, now led the advance. Recrossing Pumpkin Vine Creek, the column moved up that stream about two miles, then crossing it ascended a high wooded ridge, and continued the march along its crest. At 5 p.m. my brigade came up with Geary's division, and immediately formed in line of battle preparatory to an advance against the enemy. The Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers was deployed as skirmishers, covering the brigade front. The other four regiments, viz, the One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, and Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, formed the main line from right to left, in the order named. My brigade was supported by Brigadier-General Ruger's command. Everything being ready the signal to advance was given, the troops moved forward, and the action opened immediately. My troops, I am happy to say, moved with great steadiness, and there was not the least sign of hesitation or wavering. The enemy's skirmishers were compelled to withdraw precipitately, and some of them were taken prisoners. The brigade moved steadily forward for a distance of about one mile, when it was, by order of General Williams, relieved by the brigade of General Ruger. My regiments retired by the left of companies, permitting General Ruger's to pass through, then reformed in line of battle. The fight continued about one-half hour longer, when General Ruger's ammunition getting low, the general commanding the division directed that my brigade go again to the front. The troops of my command instantly advanced to the front line and reopened their fire. The enemy swept the line with shell and canister in addition to the musketry, thus occasioning many fearful gaps in the ranks, but not the loss to us of one inch of ground. The already depleted cartridge-boxes of my men were soon emptied of their remaining contents, and the boxes of the wounded and dead were resorted to. The ammunition thus obtained enabled the troops to maintain their fire until, under cover of the darkness, they were relieved. Some of my regiments went to the rear with scarcely a single cartridge remaining. During the night the troops rested upon their arms a few hundred yards in rear of the front line. They remained in this position during the 26th and 27th. On the 28th, having been directed by General Williams to report with my command to the officer having charge of the ordnance train of the army headquarters, to escort the same to Kingston and return, my brigade marched at daylight and reached Pumpkin Vine Creek, where the train was to be collected at 6 a.m. Much time was consumed in unloading and preparing the wagons, and the march could not be resumed until about 1 p.m. Stilesborough was reached on the 28th and Kingston at 3.30 p.m. of the 29th. The train was immediately loaded with ordnance, subsistence, and sanitary stores, and at 7 a.m. of the 30th was on its march back to the front. The entire command reached Burnt Hickory early on the morning of the 31st. Here the ammunition was shifted to another train and my brigade, having completed its duty as escort, rejoined the division at the point where it had left it, at 6.30 p.m. <ar73_89>
        On the 1st of June, the army having commenced its movements to the left, my brigade marched four miles in that direction. On the 2d the movement was continued one mile farther, and my command formed a line of battle on the left of Carlin's brigade, Fourteenth Army Corps, and threw up a line of breast-works. The brigade remained in this position on the 3d and 4th, keeping a strong line of skirmishers in front, which engaged the enemy both day and night. On the 5th, being relieved by Mitchell's brigade, of Davis' division, Fourteenth Army Corps, the movement to the left was resumed. At 3 p.m. my command encamped near the junction of the Acworth and Marietta roads five miles from Acworth. On the 6th the brigade marched again, and after proceeding about three miles, formed in line of battle, and threw up a line of breast-works. This position was changed during the afternoon, and a new line of breast-works built at a point on the Sandtown road two and a half miles north of Lost Mountain. The position of the brigade remained substantially the same until the 15th. On that date, a general advance being made, the line was thrown forward two miles on the Sandtown road. General Geary's division, having encountered the enemy, and become engaged with him in his trenches, General Williams directed me to support him with my brigade. I moved my command in line of battle up to within a few yards of Geary's line, and, as ordered by General Williams, constructed a breast-work under cover of the darkness of the evening. On the 16th, being relieved by Geary s troops, I was ordered to withdraw my command a few hundred yards, which was accordingly done.
        Early on the morning of the 17th my brigade joined in the pursuit of the enemy, who had abandoned his works during the previous night. The advance continued about one and a half miles, when the enemy was again discovered in a strongly fortified position. The picket became immediately engaged with him, and the brigade formed a new line of battle, which was at once strengthened by breast-works. The position thus taken remained unchanged during the 18th. During the night, however, the enemy abandoned works of immense strength, and which, if not impregnable, seemed to have at least exhausted the last resources of military science and human ingenuity to make them so. My brigade marched in the pursuit on the morning of the 19th and went into position in front of the enemy near Kenesaw Mountain at I p.m. Active skirmishing immediately began, which resulted in the killing and wounding of several men of my command. At 7 a.m. on the 20th the brigade marched to the right, and at 7 p.m. encamped in line of battle on Atkinson's plantation. On the 21st my line was strengthened by breast-works, the position remaining otherwise unchanged. At 10.30 a.m. on the 22d my brigade advanced about one mile directly to the front and went into position on the left of General Knipe's brigade on the crest of a high wooded hill. The troops were concealed by the timber. My line overlooked an open field and hollow about 1,000 yards in width, on the farther side of which the rebel skirmish line was plainly visible. There was no serious demonstration in my immediate front, and no movement of my command until 5.30 p.m. About that time the enemy, having massed his forces under the concealment of the woods, suddenly debouched from the timber and advanced to assault the hill occupied by my brigade. General Knipe, on my right, had already become heavily engaged, and the enemy's masses, preceded by a strong skirmish line, came boldly forward, <ar73_90> apparently bent upon carrying my position at every hazard. As directed by General Williams, I marched my brigade out of the woods, formed it in line of battle along the brow of the hill, and made all possible preparations to receive the enemy's expected onslaught. Lieutenant Winegar's battery (I), of the First New York Artillery, which was supported by my line, opened a vigorous fire as soon as the enemy began to advance and plunged so well directed and rapid a fire of shell against his masses that they soon became checked and confused, and were finally compelled to withdraw. In the mean time, General Knipe's line being dangerously pressed, I was directed by General Williams to send one of my regiments to form on the left flank of that brigade, to prevent the enemy from turning it. I immediately dispatched the Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers with directions to report to General Knipe and remain with his command subject to his orders. During the battle this regiment suffered considerably. Excepting this, my brigade, not being much engaged, suffered but little, and that chiefly from the enemy's shells. The fight substantially ceased at sundown, and as soon as safe to do so, I strengthened my line with breast-works. The enemy, repulsed at all points, retired, and the battle subsided into the irregular firing of the pickets. The position of my brigade remained unchanged until the 3d of July. On the 27th of June it was held in readiness to participate in the assault then made upon the enemy's works, but was not moved from its intrenchments. During the night of July 2 the enemy again retreated, leaving his fortifications in our front vacant; at 7 a.m. on the ensuing morning my command marched inside of them. The pursuit was continued about five miles, when the brigade was put in position in front of the enemy, who was again discovered strongly intrenched. On the 4th the position was slightly changed, preparatory to an anticipated advance, which, however, was not made. At 5 p.m. the command moved one and a half miles to the right and encamped. On the morning of the 5th it was discovered that the enemy had again retreated, and the troops at once began the pursuing march. Passing through a broken and wooded country by unfrequented roads and by-ways, the column came up with the enemy in his fortifications on the right bank of the Chattahoochee River at 6 p.m. The brigade was put in position along the summit of one of the series of heights skirting the river and overlooking the city of Atlanta. On the 6th of July I received an order of Major-General Thomas transferring the Forty-fifth New York Veteran Volunteers from the Third Brigade, First Division, to the Fourth Division, Twentieth Corps, and directing that the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, then at Nashville, Tenn., immediately report for duty with my brigade. At noon of the same day my command marched from its position on the height crowning the right bank of Nickajack Creek, and crossing that stream, went into position again on the right of the Fourteenth Corps. Here the troops threw up breast-works and otherwise strengthened their line. No further event occurred to mark the history of the brigade, until the night of the 9th, when the enemy disappeared from its front, having retreated over the river. The position of my command remained the same up to the 17th of July. On that day it marched in conjunction with the other brigades of the division to Pace's Ferry and crossed the Chattahoochee River at that point. On the 18th, in obedience to an order from General Williams, I detailed the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran <ar73_91> Volunteers to accompany a reconnaissance, under Colonel Carman, of the Thirteenth New Jersey Volunteers, to Island Creek. The reconnoitering party encountered and engaged the enemy's cavalry early in the forenoon, but no serious loss occurred to the regiment from my command· The brigade marched at 2.30 p.m., and crossing Nancy's Creek, encamped near Buck Head. Here it remained until the evening of the 19th, when it marched on the road leading to Atlanta, and encamped at 8.30 p.m. on the north bank of Peach Tree Creek· Early on the morning of the 20th my command crossed Peach Tree Creek, and ascended the chain of hills skirting the left bank. It being understood that the line was to be pushed forward and the enemy pressed during the day, care was not taken to put the troops regularly into position or to intrench the line. The picket was pushed forward far enough to feel the enemy and discover his whereabouts. No special precaution was taken against an attack, for none was anticipated· At 2 p.m., however, a heavy discharge of musketry was heard in the direction of General Geary's division. The storm quickly rolled along toward the right, and it became suddenly apparent that the enemy was advancing in heavy force. Preparation was immediately made to meet him. At the instance of General Williams, I marched my brigade by the right flank at double-quick time along the crest of the hill, then formed in line of battle and moved a short distance down the eastern face of the hill into the timber. This movement was not fully executed when the enemy opened a heavy fire of musketry upon my line, and received a similar compliment in return. The battle at once grew fierce and bloody, a portion of my troops becoming mingled with those of the enemy in an almost hand-to-hand conflict. The One hundred and forty-third New York, Eighty-second Ohio, Sixty-first Ohio, and One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, being in my front line, bore the brunt of the attack. The Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers was formed a short distance in rear, and in support of the other regiments. The first onslaught of the enemy was finally repulsed, and he sullenly withdrew a short distance, still, however, maintaining a considerable fire. In the mean time the battle grew very warm along General Knipe's line on my right. I was directed by General Williams to send two regiments to re-enforce General Knipe's brigade, and in compliance with the order at once dispatched the One hundred and first and Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers. These two regiments reported to General Knipe, and remained with his command during the remainder of the battle. The fight continued to rage with irregular fury until sundown, when the enemy, being repulsed at all points, withdrew his forces. I regret to say that this sanguinary engagement cost my brigade many valuable officers and men. It would be invidious to mention names where all alike performed their part so nobly Never was the hardihood and temper of my entire command more completely and thoroughly tested. The battle was sprung upon it at an unexpected moment, and with a fury not hitherto exceeded in the annals of the campaign. Yet officers and men sprang with alacrity to the post of duty and danger, and met the shock of battle with a courage, promptitude, and determination that ought to command the most lasting and exalted admiration. On the 21st my brigade was joined by the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, over 700 strong, from Nashville. The position of the troops remained the same as on the evening of the previous day, except that it was covered by a line of defensive works. On the 22d, <ar73_92> the enemy having fallen back during the night previous, my command advanced one and a quarter miles directly toward Atlanta and formed a new line, the right of which rested upon the road by which the advance was made. A strong breast-work, covering the line, was immediately constructed under fire of the enemy's artillery and sharpshooters. The position thus assumed remained unchanged until the 24th instant, at which date, owing to severe illness, I was compelled to request the brigadier-general commanding division to relieve me temporarily from command. The request was promptly granted, and Col. Horace Boughton, of the One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, assumed command of the brigade.
        I cannot close this report without expressing my high appreciation of and sincere thanks for the gallantry, ability, and hearty spirit of co-operation displayed by the commanders of the regiments of my brigade throughout the period of my command. Their names and regiments, to mention which affords me mingled pride and pleasure, are as follows: Col. S. J. McGroarty, Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers; Col. H. Boughton, One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers; Col. F. H. West, Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers; Lieut. Col. D. Thomson, Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers; Lieut. Col. E. S. Salomon, Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers; Lieut. Col. J. B. Le Sage, One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, and Lieut. Col. A. Dobke, Forty-fifth New York Veteran Volunteers. To the different members of my staff my hearty thanks are also due for their willing and able performance of their arduous duties. To them all I am deeply indebted, and shall hold in lasting remembrance their names, which are as follows: Capt. F. S. Wallace, topographical engineer: Capt. B. Reynolds, inspector-general; Capt. C. Hearrick, acting aide-de-camp; Capt. R. Lender, aide-de-camp; Capt. A. E. Lee, acting assistant adjutant-general; Capt. C. Saalmann, acting commissary of Subsistence; Lieut. H. Rocke, acting assistant quartermaster, and Lieut. George Young, provost-marshal.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            J. S. ROBINSON,
                                                                    Colonel Eighty-second Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Brigade.

                                                            Capt. S. E. PITTMAN,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Division, Twentieth Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 202.--Report of Lieut. Col. David Thomson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry.
[ar73_110 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. EIGTY-SECOND REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,
                                                            Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864.

SIR: In accordance with your order, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Eighty-second Regiment of Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry during the campaign which has just ended with the capture of Atlanta:
        On the 2d day of May, 1864, the regiment, then encamped near Bridgeport, Ala., broke camp and marched to Lookout Valley, Tenn., where it joined the Twentieth Corps, or that portion encamped at that place. The regiment afterward marched to Resaca and took part in the engagement near that place. Here Capt. William J. Dickson, of Company B, who was at the time acting as major, was killed; my command met with no other loss. On the 25th day of May the regiment participated in the battle of Dallas, and met with a very severe loss; 11 enlisted men were killed and 53 wounded. On the 28th the Third Brigade, of which the Eighty-second forms a part, was sent as an escort to the ordnance train of the Twentieth Corps to Kingston, Ga. The train, after being loaded with ammunition, returned to the front escorted by the Third Brigade, where it arrived on the 1st day of June. From this date until the 22d day of June the regiment was constantly skirmishing with the enemy; I enlisted man was killed by a shell near Pine Mountain on the 16th day of June. On the 22d day of June the Twentieth Corps advanced to near Kenesaw Mountain. Here the First Division was attacked by the enemy before it had taken up a position. The enemy were, however, handsomely repulsed. My command lost 1 man killed and 3 wounded. The enemy having retreated from Kenesaw Mountain, the Twentieth Corps again advanced on the 3d day of July. Constant skirmishing was kept up with the enemy, who was still retreating slowly. On the 19th of July <ar73_111> my command, together with the Thirteenth New Jersey, was sent to find and make connection with the right of the Fourth Corps. Both regiments were under the command of Colonel Carman, of the Thirteenth New Jersey. We found the right of the Fourth Corps and rendered material assistance to the skirmishers of General Wood's division of said corps in driving back a strong force of the enemy. The next day, the 20th, my command was again in the front and hotly engaged with the enemy, who had attacked the Twentieth Corps in large force. My loss was heavy; 1 officer, Lieut. Asa H. Gary, was killed; 11 enlisted men were killed and 45 wounded; 5 enlisted [men] were missing and it is thought were taken prisoners. On 21st my command moved to in front of Atlanta, where it built strong earth-works under the constant fire of the enemy's guns. On the 28th day of August, the Twentieth Corps having remained before Atlanta until that date, the corps fell back to the Chattahoochee River, while the remainder of the army moved to the right and engaged the enemy near Jonesborough. The regiment remained at this point until the 2d day of September. The enemy having evacuated the city, the Eighty-second was sent, together with the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers and General Knipe's brigade, to occupy and hold the place. A portion of the Third Division, Twentieth Corps, occupied the city the same day.
        During the campaign the regiment lost 2 officers killed, and also 30 enlisted men killed; 98 enlisted men were wounded, of whom 9 have since died of their wounds. The officers and men of my regiment deserve my thanks for the ready obedience they have at all times yielded me. With a very few exceptions they have at all times discharged their duty bravely and manfully. They have borne the long marches and many fatigues and privations of the campaign without a murmur.
        I am, captain, very respectfully,

                                                            D. THOMSON,
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Capt. A. E. LEE,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 31.--Report of Col. James S. Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.
[ar77_659 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. THIRD BRIG.. FIRST DIV., TWENTIETH CORPS,
                                                            Near Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: I have the honor to submit the following report of the services and operations of this brigade from the occupation of the city of Atlanta down to the capture and occupation of Savannah:
        On the 5th of September the entire brigade was encamped near Atlanta, Ga., having marched to that place from Montgomery's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee River, on the day previous. At this time and up to the 27th, at which date I rejoined the brigade from sick leave, it was commanded by Col. Horace Boughton, of the One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers. From this officer I have received no report, and shall, therefore, limit myself to the time of actual command. On the 28th, by order of Brig. Gen. A. S. Williams, commanding division, I formally resumed command of the brigade. I found the troops at this time in good health, with tidy, well-policed camps, and well supplied with clothing, arms, and food. Daily drills in company and battalion tactics had been established, under which exercise the troops seemed to be rapidly improving in discipline and efficiency.
        On the 4th of October the Twentieth Corps having been charged with the sole occupation and defense of Atlanta, a new chain of defenses around the city was commenced. A detail of 7 officers and 350 men to work upon these fortifications was now required from and daily furnished by my brigade. This work was continued, with but little interruption, on the part of my command down to the 15th. On that date the brigade was designated to accompany a foraging expedition consisting of three brigades of infantry, a division of cavalry, a battery of <ar77_660> artillery, and 733 wagons sent out on the following day and to the command of which I had the honor to be appointed. The infantry, the Third Brigade, First Division, the Second Brigade, Second Division, and the Second Brigade, Third Division; the artillery, Captain Sloan's battery, and the train under charge of Capt. E. P. Graves, assistant quartermaster, rendezvoused on the Decatur road at 6 a.m. The expedition marched at 6.30 a.m. and was joined at l p.m. by Colonel Garrard's division of cavalry at Avery's Cross-Roads. The head of the column encamped at Flat Shoals at 7 p.m., and by 10 p.m. was joined by all the troops and trains. On the 17th, leaving the Third Brigade of the First Division and two sections of artillery in Charge of about 400 wagons at Flat Shoals, I took the remainder of the troops and wagons and marched down the left bank of the South River in quest of forage. Though the country was poor and unproductive, I succeeded in loading most of the train by night-fall. On the following day, the 18th, leaving the Second Brigade, Third Division, and two sections of artillery at Flat Shoals in charge of the loaded wagons, with the remainder of the troops and wagons I crossed South River. Here I found a country more fertile than that foraged the day previous, and succeeded without difficulty in obtaining enough corn to load the entire train. A slight resistance offered by the enemy's cavalry was easily overcome without loss. The expedition at night-fall rejoined in safety the detachment left at Flat Shoals, and on the next day, the 19th, returned to Atlanta. The quantity of corn brought in amounted to about 11,000 bushels. The troops obtained besides this a considerable quantity of fresh beef, fresh pork, poultry, sweet potatoes, and other species of provisions. The immediate command of my brigade during this expedition was intrusted to Lieut. Col. E. S. Salomon, of the Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, who was the senior officer present. I take pleasure in acknowledging the efficiency and zeal with which Lieutenant-Colonel Salomon discharged the duty thus devolving upon him. On the 21st the work on the fortifications was resumed by my brigade, which furnished a detail of 200 men for that purpose. On the 24th this detail was reduced to 100 men. On the 25th I received an order to join with my brigade a foraging expedition to be sent out on the following day under the command of Brigadier-General Geary. According to directions, my command reported to General Geary on the Decatur road at 6 a.m. on the 26th, and was assigned, in connection with a battery of artillery, to the duty of covering the rear of the column. Passing through Decatur at 11 a.m., my command reached Stone Mountain at 9.30 p.m. Early on the 27th, by General Geary's direction, I sent out two regiments, the One hundred and first Illinois and Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, to assist in loading wagons with corn. They returned to camp at 6.30 p.m., having succeeded, in spite of the very inclement weather and prowling detachments of hostile cavalry, in loading 196 wagons. On the 28th, by direction of General Geary, I proceeded with my brigade, a section of artillery, a battalion of cavalry, and about 300 wagons, across Yellow River in the direction of Lawrenceville. I found here a productive country and had no difficulty in loading the entire train. My command returned toward Berkshire at 3 p.m., crossing Yellow River upon a bridge which, though partly burned by the enemy the day previous, was nevertheless easily rendered passable for the train. The column reached Berkshire at sundown and pushed forward, following the remainder of the expedition, which had already preceded us on its return march. Reached Stone Mountain at 10.30 p.m., and encamped three miles beyond Stone Mountain Station <ar77_661> at about midnight. On the following day my brigade formed the vanguard of the expedition and returned without accident to its encampment at Atlanta. During this expedition my brigade secured about 6,000 bushels of corn, besides the usual amount of provisions and other promiscuous articles. On the 30th orders were issued to send all surplus baggage to the rear, and such preparations began to be made as clearly indicated the approach of a great movement. No further work was done on the fortifications, and all attention was given to putting the command in the best possible condition to march.
        On the 5th of November, at 1 p.m., I received an unexpected order to move my brigade immediately. In a very short space of time the column was moving out the McDonough road, every one supposing this to be the initial step of the campaign, but the sequel proved otherwise. Proceeding about three miles the troops bivouacked for the night, and on the following day marched back to their camps near the city. The payment of my command, which had been but partially completed, was now continued. On the 8th the Presidential election was held in those regiments entitled by law to vote. On the 9th, at daybreak, a violent cannonade suddenly broke out on the southeastern side of the city. The cause of this was hardly comprehended, but it soon became apparent that a hostile force, either great or small, had appeared in front of our works. The firing soon shifted to our right, in front of General Geary's division, and began to be mingled with musketry; my brigade was soon afterward ordered to move to the support of General Geary, whose lines were reported as being dangerously threatened. In a few minutes my column was in motion down White Hall street, the troops keeping step to the martial bands, and the colors floating in the breeze. I had hardly reached the suburbs of the town, however, when I was informed by Major-General Slocum, that the enemy, about ---- in number, under the rebel General Iverson, had been driven off, and that my brigade would not be needed, and might return to its camp. I thereupon countermarched my column and moved it back to its old position. Excepting the changes incident to the reorganization of the army, no further event of importance transpired until the 14th, when the final marching orders were received.(*)
        Respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            J. S. ROBINSON,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding.

                                                            Lieut. GEORGE ROBINSON,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 33.--Report of Lieut. Col. David Thomson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry.
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                                                            HDQRS. EIGHTY-SECOND REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,
                                                            Near Savannah, Ga., December 27, 1864.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with circular from headquarters First Division, Twentieth Corps, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the various foraging expeditions sent out from Atlanta, and also in the recent campaign:
        The Eighty-second Regiment formed a part of the advance force which occupied Atlanta on the 2d day of September, and at that time was temporarily attached to the command of Brigadier-General Knipe. The First Division, of which the Eighty-Second Regiment formed a part, remained encamped in Atlanta from the time of its occupation by our forces until the 15th of November. The enemy having interrupted our line of communication with the rear, various foraging expeditions were sent out south of Atlanta for the purpose of procuring forage and provisions. The brigade to which the regiment is attached was sent out on two of these expeditions, the first expedition under command of Colonel Robinson, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, and the second under command of Brigadier-General Geary. On these expeditions the regiment loaded 540 wagons of corn and provender; in addition the following supplies: 50 bushels potatoes, 25 head of hogs, 15 head of sheep, 6 head of cattle, and 20 gallons of molasses.
        Early on the morning of the 9th of November the enemy, in small force, made an attack on our picket-line south of Atlanta. The Third Brigade was sent to the attacked point, but before getting into position the enemy were repulsed, and the brigade returned to its encampment.(*)
        I am, captain, very respectfully,

                                                            D. THOMSON,
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Capt. A. E. LEE,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#12

                                                            HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH CORPS,
                                                            Atlanta, Ga., October 15, 1864.

        An expedition for the purpose of collecting forage will be sent out from this city to-morrow. The train will consist of 400 wagons, with a guard of three brigades of infantry and two batteries of artillery. Captain Whittelsey, acting chief quartermaster, will collect together to form this train all wagons now in the city which do not belong to the Twentieth Corps that can be spared, making up the balance of the train from the transportation of the Twentieth Corps. If possible to make up the number without using the wagons that have just returned, he will do so, but in any event the train will number 400 wagons. The expedition will be under the command of Colonel Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers, whose brigade will accompany the expedition. Brigadier-General Geary, commanding Second Division, and Colonel Dustin, commanding Third Division, will each detail one brigade as guards and instruct the commanding officer to report this afternoon to Colonel Robinson for instructions. Major Reynolds, chief of artillery, will detail two four-gun batteries to accompany the expedition and instruct the senior officer to report to Colonel Robinson. The train will be made up on the Decatur road, and be in readiness to start at 6 a.m.
        By command of Major-General Slocum:

                                                            H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel and Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#25

                                                            HEADQUARTERS TWENTIETH CORPS,
                                                            Atlanta, Ga., November 3, 1864.

        An expedition will be sent from this corps to-morrow morning under the command of Colonel Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers. Each commander of division in this corps will detail from his command one brigade, and instruct the commanding officer to report this afternoon to Colonel Robinson for orders. Major Reynolds, chief of artillery, will detail one battery, and instruct its commanding officer to report also this p.m. to Colonel Robinson. Colonel Garrard, commanding cavalry, will send out at 6 a.m. to-morrow a scouting party of 100 men on the McDonough road, and another of 100 men on the East Point road. The <ar79_615> balance of his cavalry will report to Colonel Robinson, to accompany the expedition, which will start from here at 6 a.m. The troops will carry three days' rations in haversacks. The brigades that are now being paid, or such as have not been paid, will not be detailed for this duty.
        By command of Major-General Slocum:

                                                            H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIV [S# 92]
NOVEMBER 15-DECEMBER 21, 1864.--The Savannah (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 91.--Report of Col. James S. Robinson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.
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                                                            HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FIRST DIV., TWENTIETH CORPS,
                                                            Near Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1864.

LIEUTENANT :(*)

        On the 15th [November], at 7 a.m., my brigade filed out of its encampments and made its final exit from the city of Atlanta. Behind us all means of communication and supply had been utterly destroyed, and the town itself was a blazing ruin, abandoned alike by citizens and <ar92_253> soldiers to the harsh fortunes of war. Before us lay a vast stretch of country, containing no organized army, yet thoroughly infested with enemies clear to its natural boundary, the ocean. There was nothing left for us to rely upon but ourselves, our leader, and the God of battles. Moving out on the Decatur road, my brigade passed the village of Decatur at 2 p.m. Our first day's march terminated near Stone Mountain, about fifteen miles from Atlanta. Early on the morning of the 16th I was directed by General Jackson, commanding division, to take my brigade and commence destroying the Georgia railroad at a point about half a mile beyond my encampment. Extending my brigade along the track, I succeeded in thoroughly destroying about two miles of it by the a.m. After this was accomplished, having been assigned as rear guard of the corps, my command awaited the passage of the troops and trains. This was not completed until 5 p.m.,at which hour my brigade marched from Stone Mountain. My column crossed Stone Mountain Creek at 10 and Yellow River at 11.30 p.m. It encamped on the left bank of Yellow River, near Rock Bridge Post-Office, about midnight, having marched about seven miles. My brigade, still the rear guard of the corps, marched from its camp near Rock Bridge at noon on the 17th. It crossed No Business Creek at 1, Big Haynes Creek at 5, and Little Haynes Creek, at Summers' Mills, at 7 p.m. My column was greatly detained by the trains, which moved very slowly, owing to the heavy loads carried in the wagons and the difficult places in the road. My command did not get into camp until one hour after midnight, when it reached a point near Flat Creek. The distance marched on this day was about thirteen miles. My brigade marched, following the Second Brigade of the First Division, and charged with the protection of about 100 wagons, at 8 a.m. on the 18th; it passed Alcovy Mountain at 11, and crossed Alcovy or Ulcofauhachee River at 11.30 a.m. At 1.30 p.m. it reached Social Circle, on the Georgia railroad. Here it emerged into a fine, level, open country with a good road which enabled us to move along briskly. At 8 p.m. my command passed through Rutledge Station, and at 10 p.m. encamped five miles west of Madison.
        My brigade marched at 7.45 a.m. on the ensuing morning, November 19, leading the division and corps, and unencumbered with wagons. At 10 a.m. it passed through the village of Madison and marched in a southward course on the Eatonton road. At 12 m. it encamped three miles south of Madison. The aggregate distance marched on this and the preeeding day was about twenty-five miles. On the 20th my command resumed its march at 7.15 a.m. It moved in rear of the division and was charged with the protection of about 300 wagons, including the pontoon and a large portion of the Second Division train. Considerable rain had fallen, which rendered the road heavy and retarded the movement of the column. It crossed Sugar Creek at 11.30 a.m., and Clark's Fork at 1 p.m. The country now being traversed was quite fertile, and afforded an abundance of all kinds of supplies. A considerable number of fine horses and mules were also brought in. By this means the transportation of my brigade was greatly improved. At 7 p.m. my command reached a point about four miles and a half from Eatonton and encamped. The distance marched this day was about twelve miles. On the 21st the morning dawned dark and lowering, with occasional gusts of rain. My brigade was again assigned to duty as rear guard of the corps. A battery of artillery accompanied my command, which was unencumbered with wagons. Our march commenced at 11 a.m. At 1 p.m., the column being temporarily delayed by the breaking of a tongue in an artillery carriage, the rebel cavalry appeared in our rear and made <ar92_254> a slight demonstration. It was driven off precipitately by the Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, which constituted my rear guard. At 4 p.m. my command marched through the village of Eatonton. At 9 p.m., the column having been tediously delayed, I discovered, upon investigation, that about sixty wagons had become almost hopelessly stalled in a sort of quagmire. My troops were at once put to work lightening out these wagons and were thus employed for about two hours, when the march was resumed. My brigade encamped six miles from Eatonton at midnight, having marched ten miles and a half. At 7.15 a.m. on the 22d my march was continued. My command moved in the rear of the division and was charged with the protection of about 400 wagons. The weather had now cleared up, but the column still moved slowly. My brigade did not cross Little River until 12.30 p.m. From that point the march was resumed again at 3 p.m. on the direct road to Milledgeville. My brigade marched into Milledgeville at 7.30 p.m. Passing through the town, and crossing the Oconee River on a wooden bridge, it encamped on the left bank at 9 p.m., having marched seventeen miles. On the 23d my brigade remained in camp near the Oconee bridge. This day's rest enabled the foraging parties to collect a considerable quantity of provisions and a number of horses and mules.
        At 6 a.m. on the 24th my brigade resumed its march, leading the division and corps. Being charged with the duty of advance guard it was unencumbered by the trains. Our line of march pursued the Oconee through a sparsely settled, broken, piney country. My column crossed Beaver Dam at 11 a.m., and at 12.15 p.m. crossed Town Creek. At 3 p.m. my brigade crossed Gum Creek and at 4.30 p.m. encamped on the ridge beyond. The distance marched on this day was about fifteen miles. On the 25th, at 6 a.m., my brigade continued its march, again being the vanguard of the division and corps. Bluff Creek was passed at 7, and the column reached Hebron Post-Office at 8 and Buffalo Creek at 9 a.m. Over Buffalo Creek, a wide, swampy stream, was a series of bridges, nine in number, all of which had been destroyed by the enemy. According to directions, I detailed a regiment, the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, to assist in their reconstruction. While this work was going on, the rebel cavalry made a demonstration on the pickets on the left bank of the stream. At the instance of the general commanding division, I at once dispatched five companies of the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers to re-enforce the picket-line. The enemy at once withdrew, and the bridges were completed without further annoyance. The remainder of my brigade crossed Buffalo Creek at 3.30 p.m., and the entire command, excepting the five companies of the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers left to cover a side road, pursued its march toward Sandersville. Having ascended a plateau three miles from the creek lively skirmishing was overheard toward the front, which proved to be the cavalry advance engaging the rebel forces under Wheeler. As the enemy appeared to be charging down the road I was directed by the general commanding division to throw my command immediately forward into line, extending across and covering the road. My troops came up promptly on the double-quick, and were in a very short space of time advancing in a steady line of battle. Contemporaneously with this movement a line of skirmishers, consisting of two companies from the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers and two from the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, had been thrown forward, covering the front of the brigade. My line of battle had not advanced but a short distance when, it not being deemed necessary to push it any farther, it was, by direction of the <ar92_255> general commanding division, halted and the troops put in camp. My skirmish line, however, under direction of two officers of my staff, Capt. A. E. Lee, acting assistant adjutant-general, and Capt. Cyrus Hearrick, acting aide-de-camp, steadily advanced, and without hesitation and without loss drove the enemy from a commanding position from which he had charged our cavalry half an hour previously. Not content with this my skirmish line pursued the enemy and drove him through woods and open fields one mile farther, when it was, by my order, halted and withdrawn.
        On the ensuing day, the 26th, my brigade resumed the march at 6.15 a.m., following the Second Brigade, which was in advance of the division and corps. This brigade at 7 a.m. commenced skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry at the point where it had been left by my skirmishers on the evening previous. Soon afterward a detachment of rebels having been discovered observing our movements on a side road leading to our right, I was directed to send a regiment to drive them off. I immediately dispatched the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Le Sage. This regiment charged the enemy and drove him precipitately to the woods, capturing one prisoner, and discovering about 100 bales of cotton, which were burned, including the cotton gin. The regiment then rejoined the brigade, which had by this time resumed its march toward Sandersville. My column reached that village without any further opposition at 11 a.m. Here the trains being left in charge of the Third Division, the troops of the First Division, including my brigade, marched unencumbered toward the Georgia Central Railroad, three miles distant. My command struck the road at Tennille Station at 3.30 p.m. and immediately began the destruction of the track. About one mile was thoroughly destroyed by my brigade by sundown. My troops were then encamped near the station. The entire distance marched on this day was nine miles. On the 27th my brigade marched in the center of the division at 7 a.m. The route from Tennille pursued a secluded, untraveled road on the south side of the railroad. The troops being unencumbered, marched rapidly and made Jackson's Church by 11 a.m. At 4.30 p.m. my command crossed Williamson's Swamp Creek and arrived at Davisborough. Here the troops were encamped for the night, having marched about seventeen miles. At daylight the next morning, November 28, my brigade marched down the railroad track three miles and commenced its destruction. Inasmuch as the track bed for the most part ran through a difficult swamp much of it was composed of trestle-work and bridges, all of which were effectually destroyed. When the track was laid upon a road bed the rail upon one side, with the stringer attached, was unfastened by means of levers and lifted over against the rail on the other side. Rails and dry wood were then piled on top and the whole set on fire. The heat would soon spring the rails, still attached to the wooden stringers, into a variety of contortions, and the work of destruction was completed. Thus my brigade, in connection with the other brigades of the division and alternating with them, proceeded down the track, destroying mile after mile. At night-fall my command reached Spiers Turnout, and there encamped, having marched eleven miles and destroyed four miles of track during the day.
        At 7 a.m. on the 29th my brigade returned about two miles up the track and completed its destruction down as far as Spiers. The station house and other railroad fixtures were then burned or otherwise effectually destroyed. At 11 a.m. my command marched singly on the wagon road from Spiers. The corps and division headquarters trains <ar92_256> were placed in its charge, but it was otherwise unencumbered. My column crossed Great Coat Creek at 12.30, and arrived at Bethany at 1.30 p.m. At 3.30 p.m. it crossed Boggy Girt Creek, and at nightfall encamped two miles and a half from the Ogeechee River. By direction of the general commanding division, I sent forward a regiment (the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers) with orders to proceed as far as the Ogeechee, and there encamp for the night, picketing well the bank of the river. On the morning of the 30th the regiment sent forward to the river was withdrawn and rejoined the brigade, which marched up the right bank at 8.30 a.m. At 1 p.m. the column crossed Mill Creek and halted for dinner on Blake's plantation. At 4.30 p.m. my command crossed the Ogeechee River, at a point two miles below Louisville. The bridge here had been ineffectually destroyed by the enemy, and was repaired by my pioneer corps. My brigade pushed forward and encamped two miles beyond the river at nightfall. It marched on this day about fifteen miles.
        On the morning of December 1 the march was resumed in the direction of Birdville. My brigade moved in the center of the division and in charge of the division train. However, it did not leave its encampment near Louisville until noon. During the afternoon it crossed Big, Dry, Spring, and Bark Camp Creeks, all small, swampy streams of clear water. The march was very much retarded by the boggy places in the road. My command did not get into camp until half an hour after midnight, when it reached a point about four miles from Birdville, having marched thirteen miles. On the 2d my brigade resumed its march at 9.45 a.m. leading its division and following the Second Division, which was in advance. At noon it reached Birdville, and at 8 p.m. crossed Buck Head Creek at Buck Head Church, and there encamped. The distance marched on this day was about fifteen miles. Shortly after passing Birdville, having received reliable information that a planter named Bullard, living in that neighborhood, had made himself conspicuous for his zeal in recapturing and securing prisoners from our army escaped from the rebel authorities, I dispatched an officer with authority to destroy his outbuildings and cotton. He accordingly set fire to the corn cribs, cotton gin, cotton presses, and a warehouse containing $50,000 worth of cotton. These were all consumed, and the owner admonished that a repetition of his offense would bring a similar fate upon his dwelling at the next visitation of our army. On the 3d my brigade marched at 7 a.m. on the Sylvania road; my command occupied the center of the division, and was unencumbered with wagons. My brigade crossed the Augusta branch of the Central railroad at noon. The Michigan Engineers having been charged with the destruction of this road, my command pressed forward and encamped near Horse Creek at 4.45 p.m. The distance marched on this day was about fifteen miles. On the 4th my brigade, having in charge the entire division train, the pontoon trains, the corps supply train, and the artillery ammunition train, marched at 9 a.m. The column crossed a number of small, swampy streams, and passed through a sterile, sandy country, bountifully timbered with groves of pine. At 12.30 p.m. it crossed Little Horse Creek, and at 5 p.m. Little Ogeechee Creek. At 6 p.m. my troops encamped one mile beyond the Little Ogeechee, having marched thirteen miles. On the 5th the First Division, which had previously been in advance, dropped to the rear, allowing the other two divisions to go ahead; this consumed most of the day. My brigade marched at 5 p.m.; the road was very sloughy, greatly detaining the trains. The column advanced only about three miles and a half, when it encamped at 10.30 p.m. <ar92_257>
        On the 6th my brigade, with a battery of artillery, was detailed as a rear guard for the corps. It marched at 9.30 a.m. unencumbered with wagons. The line of march pursued the Springfield road through a moderately fertile country. My foraging parties, which were now kept out dally, were enabled to obtain a considerable quantity of sweet potatoes and fresh meat. Ample supplies of forage were also obtained along the road. My command marched on this day about twelve miles, and encamped at a point about six miles from the Ogeechee River, six from the Savannah, and sixteen from Springfield. On the 7th our march was resumed at 8 a.m. My brigade had charge of about 300 wagons, consisting of the division and the cavalry trains. The road soon entered the Cowpens Branch Swamp, a low, flat, boggy surface, about three miles in width. The wagons easily cut through the surface and many of them became completely mired. In the meantime a drizzling rain set in, which had no tendency to improve the roads. In many instances the animals had to be entirely removed from the wagons and the vehicles drawn out of the slough by the troops. By 1.30 p.m. the trains were all gotten safely through the swamp and the column moved slowly on. At 8 p.m. it reached Turkey Creek and Swamp, and at 10 p.m. encamped one mile above Springfield. The distance marched on this day was fifteen miles. At 8 a.m. on the morning of the 8th my brigade crossed Jack's Creek and arrived at Springfield. My command was now unencumbered and marched in advance of the division, following the Second Division. Our course followed the Monteith road about nine miles, then turned to the right and pursued a southwesterly direction for a distance of six miles, which brought us to our encampment, having marched in the aggregate fifteen miles.
        The march was resumed at 8.30 a.m. on the 9th. My brigade followed the Second, the First being in the advance. At 10 a.m. the column struck the main road leading to Savannah. Cannonading and musketry were now occasionally heard in the advance. It began to be evident that a considerable force of the enemy had gathered in our front and meant to oppose our onward march to Savannah. At 3 p.m. my brigade reached Monteith Swamp, where the First and Second Brigades had already encountered a considerable force of the enemy. The rebel forces were so disposed as to completely command the only practicable passage of the swamp, which was by the main road. Their artillery, which they were disposed to use freely, was so posted as to completely sweep the road, and was covered by earth-works. The advance of the First Brigade against the enemy's front, together with that of the Second Brigade against his left flank, having failed to dislodge him, I was instructed by the general commanding division to send two regiments around the left, with directions to push through the swamp if possible and turn the enemy's right. I immediately dispatched the Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, the whole commanded by Colonel West, of the Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, to whom I gave the instructions above repeated. Making a detour of about one mile to the left Colonel West formed his command in line of battle and plunged into the almost impenetrable swamp. It was found impossible to get a horse over the miry surface, and officers and men were alike compelled to go on foot. The swamp, which was about 400 yards in width, was finally passed and the troops emerged into an open field skirted on the farther side by timber, in which the enemy lay concealed. The point at which he was struck was far in the rear of his main position, which was completely turned, yet he was not wholly «17 R IV--VOL XLIV» <ar92_258> unprepared to meet Colonel West's forces, upon whom he opened fire at their first appearance. The fire was returned with a good will, but only three volleys were needed to complete the overthrow and effect the precipitate retreat of the enemy. Colonel West now cautiously advanced his line, fearing an ambush. He soon discovered that the rebel forces were all gone, and quietly occupied two fine redoubts, containing eighty abandoned knapsacks, well packed with clothing, &c. The remainder of my brigade except the Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, which had been sent to the support of Colonel West, now crossed the swamp by the main road, and the whole encamped near the rebel redoubts. This little affair, in my judgment, reflects great credit upon those concerned in it, and I take this occasion to express my appreciation of the skill and promptitude with which Colonel West handled his troops. I regret to say, however, that this affair cost us one man killed and four wounded.
        My brigade marched again at 7 a.m. on the 10th, in the center of the division, the Second Brigade leading. The road was excellent, and devoid of all obstructions. My brigade struck the Charleston and Savannah Railroad at Monteith Station at 10 a.m., and soon afterward commenced destroying the track. By 11.30 a.m. half a mile of the track was thoroughly destroyed by the brigade, and the column resumed its march, now on the direct road to the city of Savannah. By 2.30 p.m. my command reached the fifth mile-post from the city. About one mile in advance of this the enemy had already been encountered, strongly intrenched, with artillery in position. It was evident that this was the main line of the defenses of the city. My brigade immediately went into position on the left of the Second Brigade, which had already formed in the dense forest on the left of the road. My left flank joined the right of the First Brigade. Pickets covering the line were at once thrown forward, but no demonstration was made upon the enemy. My troops encamped in the position thus taken. On the 11th my command was thrown forward and to the left about 400 yards, and the troops again encamped in their position. At 11 p.m.,by direction of the general commanding division, I detached the One hundred and first and Eighty-second Illinois and Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, the whole under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Le Sage, of the One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, and sent them to the rear, to be used in guarding the trains of the corps. On the 13th I was directed to move the remainder of my brigade to the rear, to cover the approaches to the trains. At 3 p.m. my entire command was posted, covering the different roads coming from the rear. My line was about three miles in extent, joining the pickets of the Twenty-second Wisconsin Volunteers on the right, near the Savannah River, and those of the Fourteenth Army Corps on the left. The One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers was placed near the junction of the Tweedside, the Potter's plantation, and the Savannah roads. The Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers was placed about three-quarters of a mile farther to the right, on the Potter's plantation road. The One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers and Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers covered the Savannah road, near Cherokee Hill. The Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers covered the line of the Charleston and Savannah. Railroad. The Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers was placed three-quarters of a mile south of Cherokee Hill, on a road leading in that direction. The positions thus chosen, excepting those of the two regiments first named, were covered by substantial breast-works. A section of artillery, which reported to me on the 14th, was posted on <ar92_259> the Savannah road and was covered by a redoubt. My brigade remained in the position just described without incident worthy of note until the 19th. On that date, by permission of the general commanding division, I sent out a foraging expedition, consisting of twelve companies of infantry, two from each regiment, and eight wagons. My instructions to Lieutenant-Colonel Le Sage, commanding the detachment, were to proceed about four miles north of Monteith Station, to obtain all the forage and supplies he could, and to develop the strength and position of a hostile force reported to be in that neighborhood. The party returned at 3 p.m. without having obtained either provisions or forage. It had encountered the enemy's outposts and driven them back to within one mile and a half of his main camp, capturing one prisoner. During the night of the 20th, according to direction, I detailed a regiment, the One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, to cross to Argyle Island and there go into position, covering the flank of the Second Brigade, which had crossed to the South Carolina shore. On the morning of the 21st it was discovered that the enemy had evacuated the city and defenses of Savannah. The One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers therefore rejoined the brigade on the morning of the 22d. On the 23d my command moved back toward the city and encamped on McAlpin's plantation, on the right bank of the Savannah River. The position assigned me was on the right of the Second Brigade and one mile above the city of Savannah. Here my troops erected comfortable quarters, in which they still remain.
        During the extraordinary campaign which has terminated, my command marched over 350 miles, completely destroyed 9 miles of railroad track, burned a station-house, several water-tanks, and a large quantity of wood and railroad lumber; burned 12 cotton-gins and presses, and 250 bales of cotton; captured 5 serviceable horses, 42 serviceable mules, 460 head of cattle, 200 sheep, 500 hogs, 12 barrels of molasses, 1 barrel of whisky, 50,000 pounds of sweet potatoes, 10,800 pounds of rice, besides a vast quantity of flour, meal, bacon, poultry, and other promiscuous kinds of provisions. The quantity of forage captured it is difficult to estimate, but it is safe to say that it amounted to not less than 130,000 pounds. Excepting the articles of bread, coffee, and sugar, my troops subsisted almost entirely from the country. The animals also were fed almost exclusively upon what was obtained from the same source.
        I take pleasure in expressing my hearty commendation of the soldierly behavior of the officers and men of my command during this long and arduous campaign. The fatigues and privations of the march were borne with cheerfulness. The heavy labor of assisting trains, destroying railroads, building bridges, repairing roads, &c., was performed with alacrity, and when the voice of danger summoned, every soldier sprang to his post with enthusiasm. The commanders of my regiments and the officers of my staff deserve and are tendered my sincere thanks for their ready co-operation in every laudable undertaking, and their earnest zeal in carrying out my orders. But the soldiers and officers of my command need no praise from me. Their own achievements are their highest encomium, and the united admiration of their countrymen their best reward. These are already theirs, and neither my pen nor voice can add anything to them.
        n conclusion I have the honor to add the following list of the regiments composing my brigade and the officers commanding them during the campaign: Thirty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, Col Francis H. West; <ar92_260> Eighty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Lieut. Col. David Thomson; One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, Lieut. Col. Hezekiah Watkins; One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers, Lieut. Col. John B. Le Sage; Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, Maj. F. H. Rolsbausch; Sixty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Capt. John Garrett.
        The officers of my staff were as follows: Capt. A. E. Lee, acting assistant adjutant-general; Capt. Benjamin Reynolds, acting assistant inspector general; Capt. F. S. Wallace, topographical engineer; Capt. Charles Saalmann, acting commissary of subsistence; Capt. W. T. George, acting assistant quartermaster; Surg. H. K. Spooner, surgeon-in-chief; Capt. Cyrus Hearrick, acting aide-de-camp; Capt. Myron H. Lamb, acting aide-de-camp; Lieut. Charles M. Lockwood, acting assistant provost-marshal.
        The following casualties and losses occurred in my brigade during the campaign: One enlisted man killed in action, 4 deserted, 1 missing in action, 4 injured in destroying railroad, 2 captured while foraging, making an aggregate loss of 16 [12] enlisted men.
        Respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            J. S. ROBINSON,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding.

                                                            Lieut. GEORGE ROBINSON,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, First Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIV [S# 92]
NOVEMBER 15-DECEMBER 21, 1864.--The Savannah (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 96.--Report of Lieut. Col. David Thomson, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry.
[ar92_265 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. EIGHTY-SECOND REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,
                                                            Near Savannah, Ga., December 27, 1864.

CAPTAIN :(*)

        On the 15th day of November the regiment left its camp in Atlanta and entered upon the campaign which ended with the capture and occupation of Savannah by our forces. During the campaign the troops were principally subsisted off the country through which we passed. On the l6th we reached and commenced destroying the railroad near Stone Mountain. My regiment here destroyed about two miles <ar92_266> of the road. But small forces of the enemy were met, and until our arrival before Savannah it was necessary for the regiment to take a position in line of battle but twice. The first time was near Sanders-ville, on November 25. We met the enemy late in the afternoon. The fighting (which was nothing more than skirmishing) was principally done by our advance cavalry. The Third Brigade was in advance and formed in line of battle. We encamped in line, and the next morning the Second Brigade took the advance, the Third Brigade following. The enemy made but very little opposition, and we had no difficulty in occupying Sandersville. From this place we moved to Tennille Station, No. 13, and destroyed about half a mile of the railroad. On the 27th we reached Davisborough Station, on the Georgia Central Railroad, and early on the morning of the 28th commenced destroying the railroad. We destroyed about three miles of the road and at night went into camp at Station No. 11. The Third Brigade at this point was detached from the corps for the purpose of guarding the corps train. On the 30th we crossed the Little Ogeechee several miles above the railroad, in consequence of the destruction of the bridge, and encamped near the east bank of the river.
        We marched and crossed the Augusta branch railroad on the 3d day of December, leaving Milien to our right. On the 5th our regiment was sent two miles from camp, with orders to destroy two mills. I destroyed the mills and returned to camp. From this time until the 9th nothing worthy of note occurred. On the 9th we found the enemy in considerable force in our front. They were in a strong position, had fortifications with two pieces of artillery, and their front and right was protected by a swamp. The Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio were thrown forward, and succeeded in passing through this swamp and attacked the enemy from the rear and right. The Eighty-second Ohio was thrown forward as a support, but before my regiment succeeded in passing through this swamp the Thirty-first Wisconsin and Sixty-first Ohio had attacked and routed the enemy. On the 10th, having reached Monteith, a station on the Savannah and Charleston Railroad, the Third Brigade was ordered to commence and effectually destroy as much of this road as possible. The Eighty-second Ohio Regiment destroyed about 300 yards of the road and also the station-house. The same day, having reached the enemy's lines in front of Savannah, the brigade took up a position, with three regiments in line of battle, with the Second Brigade on the right. My regiment was on the front line, connecting with the Thirty-first Wisconsin on the right and the One hundred and forty-third New York on the left. On the 11th the brigade was moved a short distance to the left, the regiments occupying the same positions in line. On the 13th the brigade was moved about three miles to the rear, where a second or rear line was formed for the purpose of protecting the rear. The Eighty-second occupied the right of this line, my pickets connecting with those of the One hundred and forty-third New York on my left. My command occupied this position until the surrender of Savannah and its occupation by our forces. The regiment entered its present encampment on the 23d of December, connecting on the right with the One hundred and forty-third New York and on the left with the Thirty-first Wisconsin.
        During the campaign my command has captured 13 head of horses, 25 head of mules, 30 head of cattle, 150 head of hogs, 35 head f sheep, 200 pounds sugar, 4 tons fodder, 200 bushels of corn, 200 bushels of potatoes, 125 bushels of corn meal, 1,000 pounds of flour, 160 gallons of molasses, and chickens and turkeys innumerable. <ar92_267>
        My command also captured 30 negroes and destroyed in all six miles of railroad and 150 bales of cotton and burned two cotton gins.
        I am, captain, very respectfully,

                                                            D. THOMSON,
                                                                    Lieutenant Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Capt. A. E. LEE,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#14
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

                                                            Pulaski, December 26, 1864.
                                                            Maj. Gen. L. H. ROUSSEAU,

Nashville, Tenn.:

        The Forty-fifth, Forty-eighth, and Forty-ninth Missouri Regiments are ordered to report to you. They had better be sent down this road, one to go to Spring Hill and keep the advanced depot. The Forty-third Wisconsin, at Clarksville, is available; also a regiment at Fort Donelson, which was stopped there on its way up the Cumberland--I do not remember the number; this is now available to you. Send the Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth Missouri to this place. The One hundred and eighty-second Ohio can be used to guard the Nashville and Chattanooga road. There are also the Forty-fourth and Forty-fifth Wisconsin, now at Nashville for the purpose of being organized; when organized, they will be available for railroad duty.

                                                            WM. D. WHIPPLE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 151.--Report of Maj. James S. Crall, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry, of operations January 17-March 24.
[ar98_676 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. EIGHTY-SECOND OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS,
                                                            Near Goldsborough, N. C., March 27, 1865.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders from brigade headquarters I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command during the recent campaign:
        During the campaign just ended the Eighty-second Regiment has destroyed 2 miles of railroad, captured 113 mules, 92 horses, and 7 head of cattle. I have also destroyed 646 bales of cotton and 13 cotton-gins and 11 cotton-presses. <ar98_677>
        I have captured 25,150 pounds of meat, 7,760 pounds of flour, 4,952 pounds of corn meal, 50 bushels of sweet potatoes, 16 gallons of molasses. I also captured and destroyed 60 Enfield rifles.
        The regimental foraging parties have captured in all 25 prisoners. In the engagement of the 16th instant it lost in wounded 8, and on the 19th its loss in killed was 1, in wounded 11, and in missing its loss was 13, 6 of whom have since returned.
        I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            JAMES S. CRALL,
                                                                    Major, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Capt. ALFRED E. LEE,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 152.--Report of Bvt. Brig. Gen. Stephen J. McGroarty, Eighty-second Ohio Infantry, of operations April 10-May 29.
[ar98_677 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. EIGHTY-SECOND OHIO VETERAN VOL. INFANTRY,
                                                            Near Washington, D. C., May 29, 1865.

SIR: In compliance with orders from brigade headquarters I have the honor to transmit report of operations of my command since leaving Goldsborough, N. C.:
        On the 10th day of April, 1865, the Eighty-second Regiment, composing a part of the Third Brigade, under command of Maj. James S. Crall, left Goldsborough in pursuit of Lieutenant-General Johnston; marched a distance of fifteen miles and encamped. On the 11th, after marching fifteen miles, the regiment arrived near Smithfield. On the 12th crossed the Neuse River. On the 13th, the regiment arrived at Raleigh, N. C., where it remained in camp until the 22d [25th]. On that day the command marched in a northwest direction a distance of eleven miles, where it remained in camp two days, then returned to Raleigh, encamped one day, then started en route for Richmond, Va.
        On the 30th the regiment reached and crossed Neuse River, and on the 2d of May crossed Tar River. On the 3d passed through Williams-borough and crossed the State line into Virginia; crossed the Roanoke River. May 6th, arrived at Blacks and Whites Station. On the 7th crossed Appomattox River; arrived in the vicinity of Richmond on the 9th; remained in camp one day, when I arrived at and took command of the regiment. On the 11th crossed James River and passed through Richmond, Va., in review. On the 12th we passed Ashland Station and crossed the Chickahominy and South Anna Rivers. The 13th crossed Little River. The 14th crossed North Anna River and arrived near Spotsylvania Court-House; passed through the latter place on the 15th, and camped near the Rappahannock River, crossing the river next day. On the 18th crossed Bull Run and passed Fairfax Station. May 19, arrived in camp near Alexandria, Va.; remained in camp until the morning of the 24th, when the regiment marched to and passed through Washington, D.C., in review, and then marched to its present place of encampment.

                                                            S. J. McGROARTY,
                                                                    Brevet Brigadier-General, Commanding.

                                                            Capt. A. E. LEE,
                                                                    Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Brig., First Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/1 [S# 107]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia, From January 1, 1861, To June 30, 1865.--#32

                                                            HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH CORPS,
                                                            September 20, 1863--9 p.m.

                                                            Major-General HUMPHREYS,
                                                                    Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

        Scouts from Greenwich, Gainesville, and Auburn report no news. The scouts and patrols toward Warren ten and Germantown report a party of forty guerrillas at the latter place to-day, which has been there every day since our forces left. Patrols to Bristersburg report that the <ar107_1091> inhabitants saw a camp of twenty-five rebel cavalry at Elk Run last night. All quiet in the neighborhood of Brentsville and Howison's Ford.
        10 p.m.--A reconnoitering party of the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers just returned from Warrenton. They did not enter the town, but found about seventy or eighty rebel cavalry in possession of the same.

                                                            O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                    Major-general.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LII/1 [S# 109]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Southwestern Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, West Florida, And Northern Georgia, From January 1, 1861, To June 30, 1865.--#22
<ar109_675>

                                                            SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS No. 101.
                                                            HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,
                                                            Nashville, Tenn., April 17, 1865.

* * * * * * * * * *

III. So much of paragraph 10, Special Field Orders, No. 98, current series, from these headquarters, as includes the One hundred and eighty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the organization, First Brigade, First Division, Department of the Cumberland, is hereby revoked, and the Forty-fifth Wisconsin Volunteers is substituted in its place, the former regiment being on duty with Brigadier-General Tower.

* * * * * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Thomas:

                                                            SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,
                                                                    [49.] Assistant Adjutant-General.