75th Pennsylvania Infantry Volunteers 
Partial Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 75th Pennsylvania Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 15 [S# 15]
MAY 15--JUNE 17, 1862.--Operations in the Shenandoah Valley.
No. 42.--Report of Brig. Gen. Henry Bohlen, U. S. Army, commanding brigade, of the battle of Gross Keys.
<ar15_669>

        The brigade received orders to march on the 8th at 6.15 a.m., and marched at that time from their camping ground in the following order: Fifty-fourth Regiment New York Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Kozlay; Battery I, First New York Artillery, commanded by Captain Wiedrich; Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Mahler; Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, commanded by Colonel Krzyzanowski; Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, commanded by Major Harem. Ambulances and ammunition wagons followed in the rear of the brigade. Receiving orders to hurry on the column, I passed the train in front of my brigade and arrived near the place where the engagement should take place, immediately in rear of the First Brigade. Here I received orders to form the battalions in columns, to support the First Brigade, commanded by General Stahel. This order was executed at once, and the brigade at the point A (see diagram)(*) was put in motion in the following order, the battalions being in double columns, closed in mass: On the right the Fifty-fourth Regiment, followed by the Seventy-fifth; in the center (on the road)the battery of Captain Wiedrich; on the left the Fifty-eighth Regiment New York Volunteers, followed by the Seventy.fourth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

...

                                                            [HENRY BOHLEN,]
                                                                    Brigadier-General, Commanding.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No. 16.--Report of Brig. Gen. Carl Schurz, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division, of the battles of Groveton and Bull Run.

...

        The moment was critical. While endeavoring to rally my men again I sent orders to the battery of the Second Brigade, which I had placed in position in the rear of my left wing, to open fire upon the enemy, who threatened to come out of the woods. This was done with very good effect, and the enemy was brought to a stand almost instantaneously. Meanwhile I succeeded in forming the Fifty-fourth New York again, whose commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Ashby, displayed much courage and determination, and placed it en échelon behind the Twenty-ninth New York, which advanced in splendid style upon the enemy in our center. My extreme right, under Colonel Schimmelfennig, had stood firm, with the exception of the Eighth Virginia, while the extreme left, under Colonel Krzyzanowski, had contested every inch of ground against the heavy pressure of a greatly superior force. The conduct of the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, which displayed the greatest firmness and preserved perfect order on that occasion, deploying and firing with the utmost regularity, deserve special praise.

...

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Division.

                                                            Major-General SIGEL,
                                                                    Commanding First Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No.22.--Report of Col. Wlademier Krzyzanowski, Fifty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of the battles of Groveton and Bull Run.

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        Having no special orders I rested my men, who after their day's work were only glad enough to do so, until 2 a.m. 31st, at which time I was informed by a cavalry scouting party that all the troops had fallen back. I at once mounted my horse and went toward the hospital, at which place I had seen General Sigel and General Schulz at about 9 p.m. on the evening of the battle. Finding nobody besides the physicians and the wounded men there I returned to my men and ordered them to fall in for the purpose of marching to Centreville, whither our forces were said to have gone. I must insert here that I only had the Fifty-eighth New York State Volunteers and Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers with me at that time,. the Fifty-fourth having been detailed by General Sigel late on the evening before. Arriving with my troops at the stone bridge across Bull Run, the same was in a blaze of fire and not fit to be crossed, which circumstance compelled me to ford the river with great difficulty, as the banks are very steep. I arrived at Centreville at 6 o'clock a.m., after finding the Fifty-fourth Regiment encamped alongside of the road, and joined my division.

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                                                            W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade, Third Division.

                                                            Maj. A. HOFFMAN,
                                                                    Aide-de-Camp and A. A. A. G.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 252.--Report of Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division, with correspondence, &c.

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        Immediately east of Talley's farm, where General Devens had his headquarters, General McLean's left connected with my right, consisting of the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania and the Sixty-first Ohio, of General Schimmelfennig's brigade, deployed in line of battle on the road, having an embankment in their front and the thickest kind of pine undergrowth immediately in their rear; on their left the Sixty-eighth New York, of the same brigade, also in line of battle; the sharpshooters of the brigade in the little piece of woods between the two roads east of the open field flanking the line; the Eighty-second Illinois and the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York behind General Schimmelfennig's left, in second line, connecting with General Schimmelfennig's left; the One hundred and nineteenth New York, of my Second Brigade, occupying the southern border of the little piece of woods above mentioned; then Dilger's battery; the Fifty-eighth New York in the church grove; behind the interval the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, and farther to the left the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, in second line, and the Eighty-second Ohio still farther back, as above stated. On the left of Captain Dilger's battery commenced Colonel Buschbeck's brigade, part of which was deployed in the rifle-pits; Captain Wied-rich's battery, from which two pieces had been detached to General Barlow's brigade, stood near Colonel Buschbeck's right on high ground. On the left of Colonel Buschbeck, General Barlow's brigade, with one section of Captain Wiedrich's battery. Farther to the left, troops of other corps. A rifle-pit was constructed, running north and south, on the west of the eminence east of Dowdall's Tavern. The Reserve Artillery, which arrived in the course of the day, was placed on that eminence.
        This position was, in my humble opinion, a good one to move from if the army had followed up the offensive, which, no doubt, had originally been contemplated. As a defensive position it presented a front only moderately strong to resist a parallel attack coming from the south. I say moderately strong, as the line, especially on our right, was very thin, and we had no general reserve. But if this position was intended to protect the right and rear of the army, a look at the map will show that it lacked some of the most essential requisites. Our right wing stood completely in the air, with nothing to lean upon, not even a strong échelon, and with no reliable cavalry to make reconnaissances, and that, too, in a forest thick enough not to permit any view to the front, flank, or rear, but not thick enough to prevent the approach of the enemy's troops. Our rear was at the mercy of the enemy, who was at perfect liberty to walk right around us through the large gap between von Gilsa's right and the cavalry force which was stationed at Ely's Ford, and which, at all events, had no considerable power of resistance. If it was really the intention that we should act on the defensive and cover the right and rear of the whole army, our right ought to have been drawn back toward the Rapidan, to rest on that river, at or near the mouth of Hunting Run, the corps abandoning so much of the Plank road as to enable it to establish a solid line. As we were actually situated, <ar39_652> an attack from the west and northwest could not be resisted for any length of time without a complete change of front on our part. To such a change, especially if it was to be made in haste, the formation of our forces was exceedingly unfavorable.

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        In the absence of orders, but becoming more and more convinced that the enemy's attack would come from the west and fall upon our right and rear, I took it upon my own responsibility to detach two regiments from the second line of my Second Brigade, and to place them in a good position on the right and left of the Ely's Ford road, west of Hawkins' farm, so as to check the enemy if he should attack our extreme right and penetrate through the woods at that point. This was subsequently approved by you. The regiments I selected were the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin. The Seventy fifth Pennsylvania had to relieve the pickets of the Second Brigade, and was replaced by the Fifty-eighth New York. The Eighty-second Ohio I placed at some distance behind the left of the Fifty-eighth New York. The disposition of my troops was then as shown on Diagram No. 3, and, no orders reaching me, it remained so until the battle commenced. With these exceptions, no change was made in the position occupied by the corps.

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        It was observed by Captain Dilger that several regiments marched from Talley's farm by the right flank down to the Plank road and the low ground south of it, so as to envelop our left. The Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, which was on picket, was thus taken in the rear, and in its dispersed condition found itself, of course, obliged to fall back, its line of skirmishers, which was facing south, being driven in from the flank or captured. The regiment lost a number of men killed and wounded and a good many prisoners, among the latter Lieutenant-Colonel Matzdorff.

...

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Major-General, Comdg. Third Division, Eleventh Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                    Commanding Eleventh Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 256.--Report of Col. Wladimir Krzyzanowski, Fifty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding Second Brigade.
[ar39_666 con't]

                                                            NEAR BROOKE'S STATION, VA.,
                                                            May 15, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to submit to you the following report about the engagement of May 2, near Wilderness Run, Va.:
        About 11 a.m., May 2, I received your orders to withdraw two regiments from the position my brigade had occupied since the previous day, they being at that time placed in reserve fronting to the south. The position which was assigned to the two regiments was a reserve for the First Division, and, fronting to the west, partly formed the extreme right wing of the whole army. The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers were ordered to take this position.
        About 11 p.m. I received orders to detail one regiment of my brigade for picket duty, to relieve the Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, for which duty I ordered the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, with the exception of about 60 men, which were in excess of the number required for picket duty. Of these, 45 men were detailed to form part of the skirmishing line. To replace the regiment thus detailed, I ordered the Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, which still occupied the place assigned to it the day before. The disposition of my troops before the engagement was, consequently, as follows (see annexed sketch):(*) The Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers on picket, except 60 men; One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers on the left wing of the First Brigade, Third Division, deployed in line along the Orange Court-House Plank road, fronting south, and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers in the position above indicated, fronting west. I remained with my staff with the two last-named regiments. About 400 paces in front of the latter two regiments, the skirmish line of 80 men of the Twenty- sixth Wisconsin Volunteers and 45 men from the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers; the Twenty-sixth regiment Wisconsin Volunteers in close column to the center on the extreme right, and the Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers on the left, with deploying distance between them.

...

        Of the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers I cannot mention much, from the fact that this regiment was detached from the rest of the brigade. I have ascertained that it fought well.
        Of the Seventy- fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, the skirmishers reflect credit on their regiment.

...

                                                            W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Col., Comdg. 2d Brig., 3d Div., 11th Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. CARL SCHURZ,
                                                                    Commanding Third Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 259. -- Report of Capt. Emil Koenig,
Fifty-eighth New York Infantry, Second Brigade.

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        Late in the evening, I was ordered to proceed with my command to the brigade, which was stationed behind a stone fence in front of Cemetery Hill, in two lines, of which we formed part of the second. As Lieutenant-Colonel Otto had been detached to act as chief of staff of Major-General Schurz, I assumed command of the regiment, as senior officer present. Nothing remarkable happened during the night excepting that a patrol with some of our men, under command of Lieutenant Ehrlich, Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, went into town to ascertain the condition of our wounded. On entering the town, they were fired at by the enemy's pickets, of whom they killed and wounded several, after which they retired into our lines without loss.

...

                                                            EMIL KOENIG,
                                                                    Captain, Comdg. Fifty-eighth Regiment New York Vols.

                                                            Col. W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Commanding Second Brig., Third Div., Eleventh Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#16

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                                                            NASHVILLE, TENN., October 21, 1864--10 p.m.
                                                            Major-General SHERMAN, Summerville, Ga., and Atlanta, Ga.:

        Your dispatch of 10 a.m. 19th instant is just received. I have in Tennessee the Thirteenth Wisconsin, Eighteenth Michigan, Seventy-third Indiana, One hundred and second Ohio, Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, Eighty-third Illinois, and One hundred and fifteenth Ohio, averaging each 250 men. These regiments are garrisoning block-houses on Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, on Tennessee and Alabama Railroad, on Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and the posts of Decatur, Huntsville, and Athens. I have also the garrison of Chattanooga, comprising five Indiana regiments, averaging about 200 men each; an organization composed of detachments of various Ohio regiments, numbering about 600 men; the Fourteenth and Sixteenth Regiments Colored Troops, about 1,000 strong, and the Regular Brigade on Lookout Mountain, about 1,200 strong. The Eighth Kentucky, Sixty-eighth Indiana, and Fifty-eighth and Sixty-eighth New York, are at Bridgeport, the four regiments summing up about 1,000 men. The Twelfth and Thirteenth Regiments Colored Troops are on the Northwestern railroad, numbering 1,200 men.

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                                                            GEO. H. THOMAS,
                                                                    Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#18

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        General Rousseau's infantry force is enumerated as follows: Thirteenth Wisconsin, Eighteenth Michigan, Seventy-third Indiana, One hundred and second Ohio, Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, Eighty-third Illinois, and One hundred and fifteenth Ohio, averaging each 250 men. These regiments are garrisoning block-houses on Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee and Alabama, and Memphis and Charleston Railroads, and the posts of Decatur, Huntsville, and Athens. The Twelfth and Thirteenth (negroes), 1,200 strong, are on the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad. The Fifteenth and Seventeenth Colored Troops, 1,200 strong, are guarding quartermaster and commissary depots at this post.

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                                                            GEO. H. THOMAS,
                                                                    Major-general.