68th New York Infantry Volunteers 
Partial Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 68th New York Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No. 16.--Report of Brig. Gen. Carl Schurz, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division, of the battles of Groveton and Bull Run.

...

        While this was going on the battery of the First Brigade, under Captain Hampton, <ar16_299> was ordered to march along the outer edge of the woods in which Colonel Schimmelfennig was engaged and to take position there, in order to protect and facilitate the advance of my right; but the crossfire of two of the enemy's batteries was so severe that Captain Hampton's battery failed in two successive attempts to establish itself until I sent Captain Roemer's battery to its support, the place of the latter being filled by a battery brought from the reserve by General Steinwehr.
        At this juncture you put two pieces of the mountain howitzer battery at my disposal. I ordered Major Koenig, of the Sixty-eighth New York (temporarily attached to my staff), to bring them forward, and he succeeded in placing them into the line of skirmishers of Colonel Krzyzanowski's brigade in so advantageous a position that a few discharges sufficed to cause a backward movement of the enemy in front of my left. Now the whole line advanced with great alacrity, and we succeeded in driving the enemy away from his strong position behind the embankment, which then fell into our hands on my left also.

...

        Of those who especially distinguished themselves I have to mention the two colonels commanding brigades. Colonel Schimmelfennig commanded my right wing with that cool and daring courage and that admirable judgment which he had displayed already on former occasions, and which eminently fit him for commands of great responsibility ; while the gallantry with which Colonel Krzyzanowski, on the left wing, withstood and repelled the frequent and fierce assaults of the enemy commands the highest praise. Of Colonel Soest's conspicuous bravery I have already spoken above. The members of my staff, Major Hoffman and Captain Spraul, as well as Major Koenig, of the Sixty-eighth New York, temporarily attached to me, performed their dangerous and delicate duties with the greatest fearlessness and precision; nor can I speak too highly of the valuable aid and assistance rendered to me during a part of the action by your able and excellent aide-de-camp, Captain Asmussen. There are many officers and soldiers whose conduct deserves special notice, but to whom I cannot undertake to do justice in this report. In regard to those I would respectfully refer you to the reports of the brigade and regimental commanders.
        On the morning of the 30th of August you did me the honor to attach to my division Colonel Koltes' brigade, consisting of the Sixty-eighth New York, the Twenty-ninth New York, and the Seventy-third Pennsylvania, together with Captain Dilger's battery. Captain Hampton's battery was placed in reserve.

...

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Brigadier-General, Commanding Third Division.

                                                            Major-General SIGEL,
                                                                    Commanding First Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 16 [S# 16]
AUGUST 16-SEPTEMBER 2, 1862.--Campaign in Northern Virginia.
No. 19.--Report of Col. Gust. A. Muhleck, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Infantry, commanding First Brigade, Second Division,(*) of the battles of Groveton and Bull Run.

...

        At 6 o'clock a.m. on Saturday the brigade formed in columns of division on the center en masse, and soon afterwards received orders to march down to the left into the open, plain field, and to reform in columns of companies left in front. Here the brigade stood in the following <ar16_307> order: The Sixty-eighth New York, under Lieutenant-Colonel Kleefisch, on the right; the Seventy-third Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Muhleck, on the left; the Twenty-ninth New York in the center, Major Hartman commanding. The firing up to 2 o'clock p.m. had been of little account, but soon afterward became heavier by degrees. The enemy had crowned the plateau (a little over a mile in front of our division) with numerous batteries, and now opened a fire which soon became truly terrific. General Morell's division, which was massed in front and nearest the rebel batteries, were soon forced to withdraw from the open plain and to seek shelter in the rear of the woods to their right. The enemy's firing was splendid; their range perfect. As soon as our first line had withdrawn the rebels opened on the heavy bodies of infantry massed about 400 yards more to the rear, and of which General Schurz' division constituted a part. It was then about 3 o'clock p.m. Our batteries were unable to silence the enemy's raking concentrating fire. Our loss here was heavy through shot and shell.
        In the mean while the firing on our left (woody hills) had become extremely heavy. McDowell's troops, which had been ordered up to the extreme left of our line of battle, after a very short contest, lasting not over half an hour, were retiring from their position, abandoning the woods to the enemy, who at once poured heavy masses of infantry into them, seconded by artillery. A part of Major-General Sigel's army corps (General Stahel's) had already been ordered up to the left to re-enforce McDowell, but found themselves on reaching the top of the hill in front of an overpowering enemy, whom they bravely engaged. At this moment Major-General Sigel, Brigadier-General Schurz, commanding division, with staff, came up at full speed in front of the First Brigade, and ordered its three regiments up at once to the assistance of General Stahel. I marched my regiment by the left flank, followed by the Twenty-ninth New York in the center and Sixty-eighth New York on the right. We reached the top of the hill under a terrific shower of shell, solid shot, chain, &c. I deployed at once. The enemy was right in front, advancing slowly but steadily in deep, dense masses. A galling fire commenced from both sides. To our left, where we found the De Kalb regiment isolated from their brigade, a battery of some other corps d'armée had been abandoned. The last-named regiment, which General Stahel had wished Colonel Koltes to take under his temporary command (it being too far off from his main body), endeavored to save the cannons, but in vain. The enemy by this time had brought up and posted near the border of the woods (south-southwest of our brigade) two sections of artillery, which, from a distance of scarcely 200 yards, covered my own regiment as well as the others with a perfect shower of projectiles. It was at that supreme moment that the brave Colonel Koltes rode up to the front of his brigade, and swinging his sword high in the air, while ordering his command to take that rebel battery that a fragment of a shell killed both horse and rider. A rush made was toward the rebel cannons. Some of my men with Second Lieutenant Kennedy, Company F, reached the pieces, but were unsupported, surrounded, and the lieutenant made a prisoner. He escaped a few moments afterward, a man of Company D, Seventy-third Pennsylvania volunteers, killing the rebel who had made him a prisoner. The terrain was most unfavorable for deploying, being surrounded right and left by woods, with a deep ravine in the rear, and forming a kind of clearing not more than two acres in length.

...

                                                            G. A. MUHLECK,
                                                                    Lieut. Col. 73d Pa. Vols., Comdg. 1st Brig., 3d Div., 1st A. C.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
DECEMBER 27-29, 1862.--Raid on Dumfries and Fairfax Station, Va., including action at Dumfries, December 27 ...

No. 9.--Report of Col. A. Schimmelfennig, Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry, commanding First Brigade, Third Division, Eleventh Army Corps.

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        Two hundred men of each of the five regiments of my command, viz, Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania, Sixty-first Ohio, Sixty-eighth New York, One hundred and fifty-seventh New York, and the Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, were ready to march at 3 p.m., but it was between 6 and 7 in the evening before I received the order to march (copy No. 1), and then with orders to wait for a section of Hill's battery and 50 men of the Sixth Ohio Cavalry. The latter detachment did not arrive until after 8 p.m.; thus five hours were lost before I left this post.

...

                                                            A. SCHIMMELFENNIG,
                                                                    Colonel, Comdg. 1st Brig., 3d Div.; Comdg. 3d Div. pro tem.

                                                            Brigadier-General STAHEL,
                                                                    Comdg. pro tem. Eleventh Army Corps, Army of the Potomac.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 246.--Report of Maj. Jeremiah Williams, Twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry.

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        The line of our retreat was through a dense thicket, from which the men emerged much shattered. A large portion of them were rallied at the breastworks near General Howard's headquarters, Some of them, however, joined with a German regiment (believed to be the Sixty-eighth New York), which was ordered by its colonel to about face and retreat, and all went off together. There was no further organized fighting by the regiment during the engagement.

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                                                            JERE. WILLIAMS,
                                                                    Major, Comdg. Twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

                                                            Col. ORLAND SMITH,
                                                                    Commanding Second Brigade.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 252.--Report of Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division, with correspondence, &c.

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        Immediately east of Talley's farm, where General Devens had his headquarters, General McLean's left connected with my right, consisting of the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania and the Sixty-first Ohio, of General Schimmelfennig's brigade, deployed in line of battle on the road, having an embankment in their front and the thickest kind of pine undergrowth immediately in their rear; on their left the Sixty-eighth New York, of the same brigade, also in line of battle; the sharpshooters of the brigade in the little piece of woods between the two roads east of the open field flanking the line; the Eighty-second Illinois and the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York behind General Schimmelfennig's left, in second line, connecting with General Schimmelfennig's left; the One hundred and nineteenth New York, of my Second Brigade, occupying the southern border of the little piece of woods above mentioned; then Dilger's battery; the Fifty-eighth New York in the church grove; behind the interval the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, and farther to the left the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, in second line, and the Eighty-second Ohio still farther back, as above stated. On the left of Captain Dilger's battery commenced Colonel Buschbeck's brigade, part of which was deployed in the rifle-pits; Captain Wied-rich's battery, from which two pieces had been detached to General Barlow's brigade, stood near Colonel Buschbeck's right on high ground.On the left of Colonel Buschbeck, General Barlow's brigade, with one section of Captain Wiedrich's battery. Farther to the left, troops of other corps. A rifle-pit was constructed, running north and south, on the west of the eminence east of Dowdall's Tavern. The Reserve Artillery, which arrived in the course of the day, was placed on that eminence.

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        It was nearly 6 o'clock when we suddenly heard a sharp artillery and musketry fire on our extreme right. I at once ordered all regiments within my reach to change front. The One hundred and nineteenth New York I took out of its position in the woods, facing south, and formed it near the junction of the Plank road and the old turnpike, facing west. The Sixty-eighth New York received the order to occupy the western edge of the same piece of woods, the southern border of which had been occupied by the One hundred and nineteenth. On the right of the One hundred and nineteenth formed the One hundred and fifty seventh New York, then the Eighty-second Illinois, and farther to the right the Eighty-second Ohio, the latter receiving from me the order to cover the left of the Fifty-eighth New York, to fire one volley if the enemy should break through the woods in front, and then to make a bayonet charge. The Fifty-eighth New York and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, on the extreme right, remained as they were, under the immediate command of Colonel Krzyzanowski. Captain Dilger, commanding my battery, drew his pieces back to the high ground, near Wiedrich's battery, and opened upon the columns of the enemy as soon as they showed themselves on the old turnpike.

...

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Major-General, Comdg. Third Division, Eleventh Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                    Commanding Eleventh Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 255.--Report of Lieut. Col. Adolph von Hartung, Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry.

...

        To obey the order of Major-General Howard at this moment and at this place would have been certain useless destruction to every man of my regiment. The rifle-pit alone and nowhere else was the right place for rallying the troops. There the greatest order was soon restored, and the regiment awaited calmly the approach of the enemy. Different regiments were on our right and left. On our right I remember the One hundred and nineteenth and Sixty-eighth New York Regiments, all well rallied again. We were soon furiously attacked, but the enemy was handsomely checked and driven back. The men stuck to their colors and fought bravely, but renewed attacks of superior forces and flank movements of the enemy made all the troops on our left fall back. Our artillery, too, retreated, and broke through the rifle-pits and through our ranks. The troops on our right, too, withdrew, and the Seventy-fourth Regiment, nearly left alone, could not keep up the defense any longer, and consequently retreated. A part of the men, as it does always happen, got separated from the main part of the regiment and retreated on their own hook.

...

                                                            A. VON HARTUNG,
                                                                    Lieut. Col., Comdg. 74th Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers.

                                                            Brig. Gen. A. SCHIMMELFENNIG,
                                                                    Commanding First Brigade..


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#16

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        Your dispatch of 10 a.m. 19th instant is just received. I have in Tennessee the Thirteenth Wisconsin, Eighteenth Michigan, Seventy-third Indiana, One hundred and second Ohio, Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, Eighty-third Illinois, and One hundred and fifteenth Ohio, averaging each 250 men. These regiments are garrisoning block-houses on Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, on Tennessee and Alabama Railroad, on Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and the posts of Decatur, Huntsville, and Athens. I have also the garrison of Chattanooga, comprising five Indiana regiments, averaging about 200 men each; an organization composed of detachments of various Ohio regiments, numbering about 600 men; the Fourteenth and Sixteenth Regiments Colored Troops, about 1,000 strong, and the Regular Brigade on Lookout Mountain, about 1,200 strong. The Eighth Kentucky, Sixty-eighth Indiana, and Fifty-eighth and Sixty-eighth New York, are at Bridgeport, the four regiments summing up about 1,000 men. The Twelfth and Thirteenth Regiments Colored Troops are on the Northwestern railroad, numbering 1,200 men. The Fifteenth and Seventeenth Regiments Colored Troops, about 1,200 strong, are guarding quartermaster and commissary depots at this post. The One hundredth Regiment U.S. Colored Troops, numbering about 600 men, at work on the fortifications of Nashville. Croxton's brigade of cavalry, about 1,200 strong, is patrolling the river from Decatur to Eastport. The Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, and Thirteenth Indiana Regiments of Cavalry, each regiment averaging 750, are stationed at Pulaski, Athens, and Huntsville. The Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Tenth, and Twelfth Regiments Tennessee Cavalry, stationed at Decatur, Pulaski, and on the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad. The Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, about 1,000 strong, and detachments of Long's brigade, numbering 700 or 800, are temporarily at Columbia. All the cavalry is being mounted as rapidly as possible, and will be disposed of as you may direct. I wish, however, that you will leave with me all the cavalry except the 2,500 you wish me to send to General McCook, as I feel confident that I will be able to operate successfully against the enemy in West Tennessee with the Fourth Corps and a respectable body of cav-alry. It will be necessary, however, to have a good force of cavalry and infantry to guard the railroad and the Tennessee River between Chattanooga and Eastport whilst I am absent with the Fourth Corps in West Tennessee. In addition to the force already enumerated, the following regiments (new) have already reported to me: The One hundred and seventy-third, One hundred and seventy-fourth, One hundred and seventy-fifth, One hundred and seventy-sixth, One hundred and <ar79_391> seventy-seventh, One hundred and seventy-eighth, One hundred and seventy-ninth, and One hundred and eightieth Ohio Regiments, the Forty-third Wisconsin and Eleventh Minnesota, one-year regiments, and the Twenty-ninth Michigan, three-years regiment, five of which are so disposed of as to admit of their being sent front without any delay. The Eighty-third Regiment Illinois Volunteers, about 600 strong, is stationed at Clarksville and Fort Donelson. I know of no other troops to arrive in Tennessee, except two old regiments from General Pope's command, but have not heard of their starting yet. Do you intend that I shall take charge of East Tennessee also while you are absent?

                                                            GEO. H. THOMAS,
                                                                    Major-General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#18

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        General Rousseau's infantry force is enumerated as follows: Thirteenth Wisconsin, Eighteenth Michigan, Seventy-third Indiana, One hundred and second Ohio, Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, Eighty-third Illinois, and One hundred and fifteenth Ohio, averaging each 250 men. These regiments are garrisoning block-houses on Nashville and Chattanooga, Tennessee and Alabama, and Memphis and Charleston Railroads, and the posts of Decatur, Huntsville, and Athens. The Twelfth and Thirteenth (negroes), 1,200 strong, are on the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad. The Fifteenth and Seventeenth Colored Troops, 1,200 strong, are guarding quartermaster and commissary depots at this post. The One hundredth (negroes), about 600 strong, are at work on fortifications at Nashville. The Eighth Kentucky, Sixty-eighth Indiana, and Fifty-eighth and Sixty-eighth New York Regiments, about 1,000 strong, are <ar79_433> at Bridgeport. The One hundred and sixth Ohio Volunteers and Sixth Kentucky Volunteers are at Cowan, the tunnel, and at Stevenson; average strength of both regiments about 600 men.

...

        General Steedman's command is as follows: Eighth Kentucky, Sixty-eighth Indiana, and Fifty-eighth and Sixty-eighth New York are at Bridgeport and Whiteside's bridge, Tenn, averaging about 1,000 men; Ninth Ohio Battery, 136 men, and Battery B, First Ohio Light Artillery, 133 men, at Bridgeport.
        The garrison of Chattanooga is composed of five regiments Indiana volunteers, averaging about 200 men each; an organization of detachments of various Ohio regiments, about 600 strong; Fourteenth and Sixteenth Regiments (negroes), about 1,000, and Regular Brigade, on Lookout Mountain, about 1,200. With Fourth Corps, and enough of the new regiments to make up an active force of 25,000 infantry, I will undertake to clear the rebels out of West Tennessee, and draw off enough of Hood's army from you to enable you to move anywhere in Georgia or Alabama you may wish without difficulty, and if Hood should follow your army I will destroy the Mobile and Alabama Railroad so effectually that he will scarcely attempt to repair it again. If you can possibly spare me the troops I would like to have enough to hold the railroad securely as far as Knoxville. I believe that the re-enforcements constantly going forward will enable you to do so. Your letter by hand of Colonel Warner has been received.

                                                            GEO. H. THOMAS,
                                                                    Major-general.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93]
NOVEMBER 14, 1864-JANUARY 23, 1865.--Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee.
No. 178.--Report of Maj. Gen. James B. Steedman, U.S. Army, commanding Provisional Detachment (District of the Etowah), of operations November 29, 1864--January 13, 1865.

...

        Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Veteran Volunteers, commanded a provisional brigade of my troops, and exhibited high qualities as a soldier. I respectfully recommend him for promotion.

...

                                                            JAMES B. STEEDMAN,
                                                                    Major-General, Commanding.

                                                            [Brig. Gen. W. D. WHIPPLE,
                                                                    Chief of Staff.]


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93]
NOVEMBER 14, 1864-JANUARY 23, 1865.--Campaign in North Alabama and Middle Tennessee.
No. 179.--Report of Brig. Gen. Charles Cruft, U. S. Army, commanding Provisional Division, of operations November 29, 1864--January 13, 1865.

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        It affords me pleasure to say of Colonels Harrison, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, Mitchell, One hundred and thirteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Malloy, Seventeenth Wisconsin Volunteers, who commanded, each, one of the brigades of the division, that throughout the campaign they performed their duties and handled their commands in a creditable and soldierly manner. They are brigade commanders of much experience and reputation in the army, and deserve well for long and faithful services and for their management of their respective commands on the recent campaign. Col. Felix Prince Salm, commanding Sixty-eighth New York, who served with me in command of a temporary brigade (after leaving Decatur), is an officer of experience <ar93_519>in European armies, and is commended for the zeal, energy, and good sense which he brings to the service of the Government. Lieutenant-Colonels Banning, One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, and Grosvenor, of Eighteenth Ohio, each commanded for a short while a brigade of the division; they are good officers, and rendered the country service which should be remembered.

...

                                                            CHARLES CRUFT,
                                                                    Brigadier-General, U.S. Volunteers.

                                                            Maj. S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General, District of the Etowah.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWESTERN VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, NORTHERN AND CENTRAL GEORGIA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND WEST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 15, 1865.(*)--#8

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        Col. G. W. Keener, One hundred and fiftieth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, will relieve with a detachment of his command the troops now garrisoning the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, occupying the block-houses on the road from No. 39, at Dry Trestle, six miles east of Bridgeport, to No. 48, at Chattanooga Creek, inclusive, to the maximum of their intended capacity. Colonel Keener will also occupy with a detachment of his regiment, under command of a field officer, the earth-work and block-house on Lookout Knob, near Whiteside. The balance of the regiment will remain at Bridgeport, reporting for orders to the post commander at that place. Reports and returns required by existing department orders will be made direct to these headquarters; but the commanding officer will make such reports to the post commander at Bridgeport, through whom he will forward all official communications, as he may require. The troops now garrisoning the road, except those belonging to the Sixty-eighth New York Regiment, on being relieved will report to General Cruft, at Chattanooga.

...

                                                            S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWESTERN VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, NORTHERN AND CENTRAL GEORGIA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND WEST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 15, 1865.(*)--#14

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        Subject to the approval of the major-general commanding Department of the Cumberland, the following-named regiments are organized into a brigade to be known as the Second Brigade, Second Separate Division, Army of the Cumberland: Sixty-eighth New York Infantry Volunteers, Col. Felix Pr. Salm; One hundred and forty-ninth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, Col. William C. Kueffner; One hundred and fiftieth Illinois Infantry Volunteers, Col. G. W. Keener; One hundred and eighty-sixth Ohio Infantry Volunteers, Colonel Wildes. Col. Felix Pr. Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, senior officer of the brigade, is assigned to its command, and to whom all reports and returns of troops required by existing department orders will be made. All orders from these headquarters at variance with this are hereby revoked.

...

                                                            S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME IV [S# 117]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 13, 1862, TO NOVEMBER 30, 1862.--#24

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<ar117_578>

Maj. [Albert] von Steinhausen, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Maj. H. L. N. Williams, Ninth Louisiana.

Maj. A. S. Cassidy, Ninety-third New York Volunteers, for Maj. T. Marshall, Seventh Virginia Cavalry.

Maj. James D. Potter, Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Maj. N. R. Fitz Hugh, General Stuart's staff.

Capt. Otto Boetticher, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Capt. F. Culbertson, Seventh Virginia.

Capt. James Bense, Sixth Ohio Volunteers, for Capt. T. M. Garrett, Fifth North Carolina.

Capt. L. G. Camp, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Capt. A. Randall, Forty-fifth Virginia.

...

                                                            L. THOMAS,
                                                                    Adjutant-General.