68th New York Infantry Volunteers 
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXX/4 [S# 53]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, NORTH ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM AUGUST 11, 1863, TO OCTOBER 19, 1863.--UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.(*)--#2

                                                            BRIDGEPORT, October 2, 1863.
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel GODDARD,
                                                                            Assistant Adjutant-General, Chattanooga:

Following portions of General Hooker's command arrived:

First Division, Major-General Schurz.

First Brigade, Col. F. Hecker commanding: Forty-fifth New York Volunteers, Major Koch commanding; Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Salomon commanding; Sixty-first Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Bown commanding; Eighty-second Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Thomson commanding; One hundred and forty-third New York, Col. H. Boughton commanding.

Second Brigade, Col. W. H. Jacobs commanding: Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, Captain Esembaux commanding; Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Ledig commanding; Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, Major Steinhausen commanding: One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, Colonel Lock-man commanding; Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, Captain Winkler commanding; One hundred and forty-first New York Volunteers, Colonel Logie commanding.

Second Division, Eleventh Army Corps, General Steinwehr commanding.

First Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh Army Corps, Col. A. Buschbeck commanding: Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major McAloon commanding; Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Moore commanding; One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson commanding: One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Major Warner commanding; Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, Colonel Mindil commanding. <ar53_42>

Second Brigade, Col. Orland Smith commanding: Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers, Major Hurst commanding; Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, Major Robbins commanding; Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers, Colonel Underwood commanding; One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, Colonel Wood commanding; One hundred and sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, Colonel Brown commanding.

                                                            R. F. SMITH,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Post.
                                                                            (Same to Brigadier-General Morgan.)


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 16---OCTOBER 10, 1864.--Forrest's raid into Northern Alabama and Middle Tennessee.
No. 3.--Report of Lieut. Albert Kramer, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry, Assistant Inspector of Block-Houses.
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                                                            OFFICE OF ASSISTANT INSPECTOR OF BLOCK-HOUSES,
                                                            Columbia, Tenn., October 3, 1864.

        I have the honor herewith to submit my report of damages to fortifications in my section during the recent raid of General Forrest.
        On Saturday, 1 p.m., came General Forrest and staff with flag of truce to Block-houseNo. 5, which was in command of Second Lieut. E. Nixon, <ar77_508> Company E, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, and demanded a surrender of the block-house with garrison, which demand Second Lieut. E. F. Nixon complied with without firing a gun. Lieutenant Nixon, who was in command of Block-houses Nos. 3, 4, and 5, ordered the sergeants in command to surrender. Sergt. A. Frohn, Company L, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, in command of Block-house No. 4, Bridge No. 4, and Sergt. W. Rhinemiller, Company M, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, was in command of Block-house No. 3, Bridge No. 3. Sergt. W. Rhinemiller refused three times to comply. Lieut. E. F. Nixon then threatened to place him in arrest; he also fired on the flag. Lieut. E. F. Nixon rode with Forrest's adjutant to First Lieut. J. F. Long, Company B, Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, commanding Block-house No. 6, Bridge No. 5, and tried to induce him to surrender, which [he] refused to do, and ordered Lieutenant Nixon, with the adjutant of General Forrest, away from his block-house. First Lieutenant Long fought him from 2 p.m. until 12 m.; killed 10 rebels and wounded several; but they succeeded in destroying his bridge; his command and block-house were uninjured. During the truce, the rebels under cover of the railroad bank, succeeded in firing the bridge with turpentine; one end was burned, and the whole fell in. Block-houses Nos. 3, 4. and 5 are burned to the ground; also Bridges Nos. 3 and 4. It is learned Carter's Creek Station, the water-tank, and saw-mill, and the railroad destroyed from there to Spring Hill. Rumor says Lieutenant Nixon surrendered for a bribe of $10,000. The rebels had no artillery, and his three blockhouses were double cased up to the top log of the loop-holes. The garrisons of the three block-houses and water-tanks and saw-mill were taken prisoners, except 1 man escaped. Block-house No. 3 was garrisoned with thirty-two men, Block-house No. 4 with twenty-two men, Block-house No. 5 with thirty-one men. Thirty men garrisoned the water-tank and saw-mill. Altogether 115 men captured. Rumor says they have all been paroled, and arrived this day at Franklin. Sunday morning at 8 our pickets were driven in at Duck River bridge, but we succeeded in driving them off without any damage to the works, or loss of life. Sunday morning our pickets were attacked on four different roads, Pulaski, Bigbyville, Mount Pleasant, and Hampshire. Fights and skirmishes continued until 6 o'clock in the evening, when the enemy withdrew in the direction of Mount Pleasant, and encamped on General Pillow's plantation, moving next morning in the direction of Waynesborough. Forrest's force is reported at 2,500 men. The railroad is open from here to Pulaski. These are the whole facts as far as I have been able to ascertain. Will report further information as soon as I get it. Have no laborers nor carpenters to build these three blockhouses. Please inform me what I shall do.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            A. KRAMER,
                                                                    First Lieut., 68th New York Regt., Asst. Insp. of Block-Houses.

                                                            Maj. J. R. WILLETT,
                                                                    Chief Inspector of Fortifications, District of Tennessee.

[First indorsement.]

                                                            HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,
                                                            OFFICE CHIEF INSPECTOR RAILROAD DEFENSES,
                                                            Nashville, Tenn., October 9, 1864.

Respectfully referred to Maj. B. H. Polk for the information of General Rousseau.

                                                            JAS. R. WILLETT,
                                                                    Major and Chief Inspector Railroad Defenses.

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[Second indorsement. ]

                                                            HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF TENNESSEE,
                                                            Nashville, Tenn., October 10, 1864.

Respectfully forwarded for the information of the major-general commanding the Department of the Cumberland.

                                                            LOVELL H. ROUSSEAU,
                                                                    Major-General.

                                                            B. H. POLK,
                                                                    Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(In the absence of the general commanding.)


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#19

                                                            BRIDGEPORT, October 26, 1864.
                                                            Maj. Gen. GEORGE H. THOMAS:

        I have the honor to state that there are about 544 infantry effective at this post, exclusive of a portion of the Sixty-eighth New York Regiment, in charge of the block-houses. I have ordered 300 men to be ready to leave at once, and will report to General Steedman for more men.

                                                            M. C. TAYLOR,
                                                                    Colonel Fifteenth Kentucky, Commanding.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM NOVEMBER 14 TO NOVEMBER 30, 1864.(*)--#10
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 52.

                                                            HDQRS. DISTRICT OF THE ETOWAH,
                                                            Chattanooga, November 28, 1864.

* * * * * * * * * *

II. Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry Volunteers, will join the major-general commanding district without delay, and accompany him on the expedition ordered by the major-general commanding Department of the Cumberland, this date.
        By command of Major-General Steedman:

                                                            S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

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O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM NOVEMBER 14 TO NOVEMBER 30, 1864.(*)--#12

                                                            STEVENSON, November 30, 1864.
                                                            Major-General STEEDMAN:

        In compliance with telegram received from Major-General Milroy, I have the honor to report myself to you with my brigade stationed from Elk River to Bridgeport. The Sixty-eighth New York Volunteer Infantry and Ninth Ohio Battery, both at Bridgeport, are included.

                                                            W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Colonel.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/1 [S# 93]
DECEMBER 6, 1864-JANUARY 15, 1865.--Lyon's raid from Paris, Tenn., to Hopkinsville, Ky., &c, with skirmishes.
No. 6.--Report of Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding Reserve Brigade, District of the Etowah.
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                                                            HDQRS. U.S. FORCES, Bridgeport, Ala., January 17, 1865.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report:
        On the 6th instant I received the order to report to you for transportation at Leighton, Ala. I started immediately for Decatur, Ala., which I reached on the 7th instant, having camped the night previous near Courtland, Ala. On the 8th my brigade was shipped on the cars, with the exception of the Sixty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, ordered as a guard with General J. B. Steedman's train, with orders to return to Bridgeport. At Larkinsville, Ala., the Reserve Brigade was unloaded, and marched early on the 9th instant to join Col. J. G. Mitchell's brigade on their march toward Larkin's Landing, on the Tennessee River, leaving the Eighteenth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteers at Larkinsville, Ala. After a long march in bad, rainy weather, through mud and water, we reached Colonel Mitchell early on the 10th, at Pendergrass' house, on the Gunter's Landing road. The joined brigades proceeded to Claysville, Ala. There I received the order to march forthwith to Deposit in pursuit of a force of rebel cavalry that had taken to the woods and mountains in that direction. Very soon the trail of 200 or 300 cavalry was found. I followed the same on the Deposit road up to a cross-road near Mrs. Johnson's house, where the larger part of the force took the road to Paint Rock, small parties following the Deposit and Woodville road. According to order I took the Deposit road after having followed the trail on the Paint Rock road for awhile as long as daylight permitted to distinguish it.
        I reached Deposit at daybreak 11th instant. No other signs of the enemy were found, and the inhabitants on the road assured me unanimously that they had only seen a squad of eight mounted men the day before, and they had left in the direction of Paint Rock Creek, being unable to cross the river. I entered in communication with the gunboats General Grant and General Thomas about 10 a.m., when you arrived with the general's order to proceed immediately to Paint Rock and the railroad, striking the latter at Woodville, in order to cut off or capture some of the enemy's force scattered in the Paint Rock Mountains. I marched without delay and reached late in the evening Thomas Manning's house, in the vicinity of which I bivouacked, and resumed the march toward Woodville at daybreak 12th instant. About a mile from Manning's, at Cochran's house, I found three rebel soldiers, who skedaddled toward the mountains, joining a larger party of about 100. The whole took to flight, heavily pressed by a squad of our cavalry under your command. A number of shots were fired without effect, and one of the rebels--Davidson, Colonel Turner's regiment of mounted rifles-whose horse was wounded, taken prisoner and forwarded to Chattanooga, Tenn. C.H. Cochran, a member of Company E, Thirty-first Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, the son of the proprietor of the farm where the rebels found refuge, was also arrested and sent to the same place.
        I reached Woodville the same evening without further incident, took the cars to Bridgeport, Ala., where I did arrive on the 13th at 4 a.m.

                                                            FELIX PR. SALM,
                                                                    Colonel Sixty-eighth Regiment New York Veteran Vols.,

Commanding Reserve Brigade, District of the Etowah.

                                                            Capt. JOHN A. WRIGHT,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., Chattanooga, Tenn.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#11

                                                            NASHVILLE, December 19, 1864.
                                                            Brigadier-General MEAGHER:

        You will order the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, Colonel Palmer, the Twenty-ninth Indiana and Eighteenth U.S. Colored Infantry, to report to Colonel Mackay at once, for steam-boat transportation to Decatur. Send all of the men of the Eighteenth [Ohio and Sixty-eighth Indiana now in Chattanooga. You will relieve the Sixty eighth New York and order them to march to Stevenson at once, where I will give them orders. You will send by boat 300 boxes of ammunition, caliber .58, and 1,000 rounds of artillery ammunition, one-half shell and one-half canister, for light 12's, to Decatur by boat. Please answer,

                                                            JAS. B. STEEDMAN,
                                                                    Major-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#12

                                                            STEVENSON, December 21, 1864.
                                                            Brigadier-General MEAGHER:

        Two sections with military bridge-builders and track-layers are ordered to Decatur by Major-General Thomas to repair the road. The railroad agent wants a guard. I have sent all the men I could spare as guards to the trains to Murfreesborough. Can I order the Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers from your district as guards?

                                                            W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#22
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                                                            HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE ETOWAH,
                                                            Chattanooga, January 8, 1865.

                                                            Brigadier-General CRUFT,

Paint Rock:

        The Seventeenth Colored will proceed to Nashville; the Sixty-eighth New York will stop at Bridgeport. The detachment of the Seventeenth Army Corps can stop at Stevenson, and await orders to proceed to Savannah.

                                                            JAMES B. STEEDMAN,
                                                                    Major-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWESTERN VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, NORTHERN AND CENTRAL GEORGIA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND WEST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 15, 1865.(*)--#2

                                                            BRIDGEPORT, January 29, 1865.
                                                            Maj. S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General:

        I have the honor to report that on Friday night, 27th, I surprised and charged a rebel encampment about twelve miles from Roman's Landing. The detachment consisted of Lieutenant Smith and thirty-six men of Captain Sparks' company. They were completely routed. We killed 1, wounded 8, and captured 4, including the first sergeant. Most of their equipments and horses fell into our hands. Yesterday, 28th, on my march toward the river my rear guard was attacked about one mile from the landing by a rebel force of over eighty. The company of the Sixty-eighth New York Veteran Volunteers composing the same, repulsed them handsomely, without any loss on our part. First Lieut. Leander Martin, Company A, Eighteenth U.S. Colored Infantry, was killed in the first charge. His body is here. No other losses. Written report will follow.(+)

                                                            FELIX PR. SALM,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Post.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
JANUARY 27, 1865.--Skirmish at Elrod's Tan-yard, De Kalb County, Ala.
Report of Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry.
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                                                            HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,
                                                            Bridgeport, Ala., January 31, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to submit the following report of an expedition fitted out at this post by permission of the major-general commanding:

        The command left Bridgeport, Ala., on the 26th instant, at 3 p.m., on board the U.S. transport Bridgeport, and landed at Roman's Landing at 7.30 p.m. the same day. The march was resumed immediately after coming ashore and continued until 3 a.m. 27th instant, when I <ar103_11> camped near the school-house, Mound Mary, Marshall County, Ala. On this march a well-known guerrilla and bushwhacker named Williams, and belonging to Butler's company, was captured, and all the houses on the road were thoroughly searched, but without any result worth mentioning. At daybreak 27th instant the march was resumed. I passed through Sand Mountain narrows and reached at 1 p.m. Timms' farm, De Kalb County, Ala.; from thence we crossed Black Oak Creek and waded through Town Creek, De Kalb County, until at 7 p.m. we came in sight of the enemy. A part of Sparks' company was encamped near Elrod's farm and tan-yard, near Town Creek, De Kalb County, Ala. I approached with the utmost circumspection and silence and had a fair view of them moving around their fires, quite unconscious of our approach. I divided my command in order to surround and capture them all; but the darkness and the great quantity of timber strewn on the ground impeded the movement, so that one part of my command came to fire and charge before the junction of all the detachments was completed, giving the greater part of the outlaws a chance to effect their escape. In this charge First Lieut. Leander Martin, Eighteenth Regiment U.S. Colored, was instantly killed. The loss of the enemy was 1 killed, 8 wounded, and 3 captured. They were completely routed, and left a number of arms and equipments on the field. They were commanded by a Lieutenant Smith, and their strength is supposed to have been from thirty-six to forty in all. I camped that night on the place of the action, and resumed the march back to the river early on the 28th. The enemy followed me in the rear and on the flanks without any demonstration until 5 p.m., when a party of about 100, under a Captain Butler, attacked me in the rear, but were fairly repulsed with a loss of 5 men disabled. My men poured two well-directed volleys into them and they skedaddled as quick as they came. In this second engagement I had no loss to sustain. The forces I was engaged with are said to belong to a new regimental organization of guerrillas, called home guards, raised in De Kalb, Marshall, and Blount Counties, Ala., by a so-called Colonel Lowe, and are composed of the following full companies: Sparks' company, encamped near Duck Springs, De Kalb County, Ala.; Witherspoon's company, encamped three miles below Lebanon; Butler's company, encamped near Wakefield, Marshall County, Ala; Newman's company, encamped near Portersville, De Kalb County, Ala.; Hamack's company, encamped near Valley Head, De Kalb County, Ala. They are assigned to General Clanton's brigade, and composed chiefly of deserters and absentees from the rebel army, mostly inhabitants of the aforesaid counties, who are enlisted in these organizations under promise of pardon of their offenses. The so-called Colonel Lowe, as well as the so-called captains, are said to have no authority from the rebel War Department. I inclose copy of the muster roll of Sparks' company, found in possession of First Sergeant Williams, one of the prisoners, and a croquis of the place of the first engagement.
        The command was composed of detachments of the Sixty-eighth Regiment New York Veteran Volunteers, Eighteenth Regiment U.S. Colored infantry, and Ninth and First Ohio Volunteer Artillery Veterans. The officers and men behaved themselves well and gallantly.
        Most respectfully,

                                                            FELIX PR. SALM,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Post.

                                                            Maj. S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dist. of the Etowah, Chattanooga, Tenn.

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O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
FEBRUARY 3-4, 1865.--Skirmish at Ladd's House, Hog Jaw Valley, Ala.
Report of Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry.
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                                                            HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,
                                                            Bridgeport, Ala., February 6, 1865.

MAJOR: I have the honor to report to you that one of my scouting parties met a gang of guerrillas in Hog Jaw Valley, near B. Ladd's house; they came to fight and one of the bushwhackers, named Frank Howard, was severely wounded and died a few hours afterward. No information could be obtained from him, he being senseless until his death. The rest of the gang skedaddled to the mountains without returning the fire. The above happened during the night of the 3d to the 4th instant.
        Most respectfully submitted.

                                                            FELIX PR. SALM,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Post.

                                                            Maj. S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., Dist. of the Etowah, Chattanooga, Tenn.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
FEBRUARY 10, 1865.--Skirmish in Johnson's Crook, Ga.
No. 1.--Report of Maj. Gen. James B. Steedman, U. S. Army, commanding District of the Etowah.
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                                                            HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE ETOWAH,
                                                            Chattanooga, February 12, 1865.

        Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, surprised Witherspoon's company, in Johnson's Crook, at 2 a.m. of the 10th instant. He killed 3, wounded 5, captured Captain Countiss, Twenty-first Georgia Regiment, and 15 men, amongst them Witherspoon's brother; 30 stand of arms, and 23 horses. Colonel Salm returned to camp without the loss of a man.

                                                            JAS. B. STEEDMAN,
                                                                    Major-General.

                                                            Brig. Gen. W. D. WHIPPLE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
FEBRUARY 10, 1865.--Skirmish in Johnson's Crook, Ga.
No. 2.--Report of Col. Felix Prince Salm, Sixty-eighth New York Infantry.
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BRIDGEPORT, February 11, 1865.

        I have the honor to report to you that I have just returned from the expedition I asked permission for from you. I surprised Witherspoon's company in Johnson's Crook. The surprise was complete. I attacked on the 10th instant, at 2 a.m., killed 3, wounded 5, captured Captain Countiss, Twenty-first Georgia, and 15 men, amongst them Wither spoon's brother; 30 stand of arms, and 23 horses. Witherspoon's camp is entirely broken up by this blow. No loss on our part. A written report will follow.(*)

                                                            FELIX PR. SALM,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding.

                                                            Maj. S. B. MOE,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES II--VOLUME IV [S# 117]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, ETC., RELATING TO PRISONERS OF WAR AND STATE FROM JUNE 13, 1862, TO NOVEMBER 30, 1862.--#24
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Maj. [Albert] von Steinhausen, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Maj. H. L. N. Williams, Ninth Louisiana.

Maj. A. S. Cassidy, Ninety-third New York Volunteers, for Maj. T. Marshall, Seventh Virginia Cavalry.

Maj. James D. Potter, Thirty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Maj. N. R. Fitz Hugh, General Stuart's staff.

Capt. Otto Boetticher, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Capt. F. Culbertson, Seventh Virginia.

Capt. James Bense, Sixth Ohio Volunteers, for Capt. T. M. Garrett, Fifth North Carolina.

Capt. L. G. Camp, Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, for Capt. A. Randall, Forty-fifth Virginia.