26th Wisconsin Infantry Official Records
of the Union and Confederate Armies (Partial)


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 26th Wisconsin Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 260. -- Report of Maj. Benjamin A. Willis,
One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry.

        The next morning (July 4) about 8 a.m. you ordered us, with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, on a reconnaissance, you commanding it in person. We advanced in an easterly direction toward York for the distance of about 2 miles, completely scouring the whole country, and taking many prisoners. You then, having accomplished your purpose, ordered us to return to the position we had left in the morning. This being done, we there remained until ordered forward with the rest of the corps in pursuit of the enemy toward Emmitsburg.
        Our regiment had suffered very heavily in the loss of officers and enlisted men. Colonel Lockman fell, wounded, while gallantly standing at his post. Adjutant Dodge, Captain Volkhausen, and Lieutenant Trumpelman were all seriously wounded while nobly struggling against the enemy, the two former (Adjutant Dodge and Captain Volkhausen) having had their legs amputated, and the latter (Lieutenant Trumpelman), I regret to say, has since died from the effect of his wound. Lieut. M. Rasemann and Lieutenant Frost were, I am sad to say, killed. Both died the death of heroes. Lieutenant A. B. von Cloedt is a prisoner in the hands of the enemy.
        Lieutenant-Colonel Lloyd, who assumed command of the regiment upon Colonel Lockman's receiving the wound, behaved with the utmost coolness. Of the other officers and soldiers, I can speak only in terms of the highest praise.
        The loss of the regiment in killed, wounded, and missing amounts in the aggregate to the number of 144, including officers and privates.
        All of which is respectfully submitted.
        I am, general, respectfully, yours,

                                                                        BENJAMIN A. WILLIS,
                                                                                Maj., Comdg. 119th Regt., New York Vols.

                                                                        Col. W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                                Comdg. Second Brigade, Third Division, Eleventh Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXX/4 [S# 53]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, NORTH ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM AUGUST 11, 1863, TO OCTOBER 19, 1863.--UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.(*)--#2

...

        Second Brigade, Col. W. H. Jacobs commanding: Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, Captain Esembaux commanding; Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, Major Ledig commanding; Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers, Major Steinhausen commanding: One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, Colonel Lock-man commanding; Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, Captain Winkler commanding; One hundred and forty-first New York Volunteers, Colonel Logie commanding.

...

                                                                        R. F. SMITH,
                                                                                Colonel, Commanding Post.
                                                                                        (Same to Brigadier-General Morgan.)


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]
NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 101.--Report of Col. Orland Smith, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, including march to the relief of Knoxville.

...

        On Monday, November 23, I was directed to hold my brigade in readiness to move at 1 p.m., at which time it was formed in column of battalion en masse, and took position on the right of the Third Division, similarly formed, the First Brigade, Second Division, being in our rear.

...

        The enemy occupied a line of rifle-pits running from the direction of the mouth of the creek across the railroad, thence sweeping around our front toward our extreme right. While this brought those on the opposite bank of the creek directly in opposition to the regiments of the First Brigade, it afforded them an opportunity to annoy our left flank and rear. At nightfall, I therefore changed the direction of the left wing of the Fifty-fifth Ohio to correspond, and advanced a part of the Thirty-third Massachusetts to establish complete connection with the First Brigade. Meantime the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, of the Third Division, had been brought forward to connect with the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York on our right. On this line intrenchments were formed and the position held without material change all the next day (November 24).

...

                                                                        ORLAND SMITH,
                                                                                Colonel Seventy-third Ohio Vols., Comdg. Second Brigade.

                                                                        Lieut. R. E. BEECHER,
                                                                                Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]
NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 103.--Report of Col. James Wood, jr., One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, including march to the relief of Knoxville.

...

        At about 1 o'clock of the 23d of November, I received orders to march in column by division toward the enemy's line at the foot of Missionary Ridge. This march was in connection with the brigade, division, and corps of which the regiment forms a part. All knapsacks, blankets, and tents of the men were, by order, left on the ground on which they bivouacked. The Eleventh Corps was moved in front and to the right of Fort Wood, and was understood to be held in reserve to the Fourteenth Army Corps in the attack made by it on the enemy posted at the foot of Missionary Ridge.

...

        During the night I caused to be thrown up in our front a line of rifle-pits, connecting with a similar line thrown up by the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, of the Third Division, on our right, and by the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry on our left.

...

                                                                        JAMES WOOD, JR.,
                                                                                Colonel, Commanding.

                                                                        Capt. B. F. STONE,
                                                                                Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]
Ops. in Kentucky, Southwest Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and North Georgia.--Jan. 1-April 30, 1864.
No. 2. --Itinerary of the Army of the Cumberland, commanded by Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, U.S. Army, January 1-April 30.(*)

ELEVENTH ARMY CORPS.(+)

JANUARY.

Second Division, commanded by Col. Adolphus Buschbeck, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry.

...

Third Division, commanded by Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz.

        Five of the regiments of this division, having re-enlisted as veterans, left for home, as follows: The Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers and the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers on January 8; the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers on January 10, and the Sixty-eighth New York Volunteers on January 12.
        January 25, at 7 a.m., this division marched from Lookout Valley and assumed the following stations: The Third Brigade, with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers of the Second Brigade, were posted at Whiteside's, Tenn.; the remainder of the Second Brigade at Shellmound, Tenn., and the First Brigade at a point opposite Bridgeport, Ala. Division headquarters were established at Shellmound, Tenn., where they have since remained. The division serves as a guard for the U.S. military railroad along this route, and is engaged in guard, picket, patrol, and scouting duty.

...


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 268.--Report of Col. James Wood, jr., One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.
HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., THIRD DIV., 20TH CORPS,
Atlanta, Ga., September 23, 1864.

...

        (July 7th) On the right two companies from the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry were thrown across the creek (Mill Creek), which at that point was deep, and which they crossed on a tree fallen across it, and were deployed as skirmishers and ordered to ascend to the crest which formed the depression between the bluff and Rocky Face Mountain, and which connected the two. This order was executed in a satisfactory manner. The enemy made but a feeble resistance to our advance. The enemy showed no disposition to attack.

...

        (July 7th) The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, which had been held in reserve in this position first taken up, was permitted to bivouac for the night, as it was amply protected by the Fourteenth Army Corps, being connected with it and covered in front by the pickets of that corps.

...

        (July 7th) I immediately directed the officer in charge of the skirmishers (Major Higgins, of the Seventy-third Ohio) to see that the order was complied with. Subsequently and on the same morning I received orders to continue the reconnaissance commenced the day before. In compliance therewith, I immediately concentrated my brigade in the valley in front of the gap. The skirmishers again took the position from which they were withdrawn the night before, being compelled the second time to drive the enemy's skirmishers therefrom. The One hundred and thirty-sixth New York and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers were deployed in line of battle in front of the bluff. The Fifty-fifth Ohio was ordered to cross the creek and hold the bluff which had been taken by the skirmishers. I was ordered by Major-General B[utterfield] to throw a regiment across the creek near the foot of the Rocky Face Mountain and to advance it to the crest of the spur that connected the bluff with the mountain. To comply with the order it became necessary to build a bridge across the Mill Creek. This was done with commendable dispatch by the division pioneers. I ordered across the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers and it pushed forward promptly to fulfill the order of the division commander. In the mean time the enemy had planted a section of artillery on the crest of Rocky Face Mountain, and opened with grape and canister on the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers. That regiment was promptly withdrawn out of range to the west side of the creek at the foot of the bluff. The enemy's guns, however, were very soon silenced by some artillery of the Fourteenth Corps. By direction of Major-General Butterfield, I ordered the Thirty-third Massachusetts, which up to this time had been held in reserve, to cross the creek, and, if possible, to gain the crest of Rocky Face Mountain. To cover the operations of the two regiments across the creek the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York were moved to the right and deployed on the west side of the creek in the rear of Seventy-third Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts. While these last-named regiments were engaged in carrying out the order they had received, the skirmishers of the Seventy-third Ohio having gained the crest of the spur, so as to overlook the enemy's works in the gap, and the skirmishers of the Thirty-third Massachusetts having ascended more than half way to the crest of Rocky Face Mountain, I received an order that my brigade would be relieved by Carlin's brigade, of the Fourteenth Corps.

...

        (July 7th) The men ran over and through the right of my line, mingling with the right regiment and creating so much confusion as to render the regiment (Twenty-sixth Wisconsin) almost unserviceable, as well as causing great hindrance to the regiment next to it (Thirty-third Massachusetts). Major Winkler, with commendable skill and ability, with no little difficulty extricated his men from the confused mass into which they had become involved and brought them again reformed into line. This hill being a position of much importance to the enemy, it was not to be supposed that he would yield it without a struggle or without making an effort to retake it after being driven off. Accordingly, regimental commanders were cautioned that they might expect to be in turn attacked, but that they must hold the position at all hazards. The expectation seemed to be well founded, for the enemy made two furious assaults upon my line, but was gallantly and successfully repulsed.

...

        (July 20th) As soon as the skirmishers  were deployed they advanced and took possession of the front hill or ridge. Behind them and on the flat or bottom land the division was deployed into line of battle, the First Brigade on the right, connecting with Geary's division, the Second Brigade in the center, and the Third Brigade on the left, connecting with Newton's division, of the Fourth Corps. The first formation of the brigade was three regiments in front, viz, the Seventy-third Ohio, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, and Twentieth Connecticut, in the order named from right to left. Thus formed, the brigade took position immediately in rear of and at the foot of the first bluff or ridge above alluded to, by which it was entirely covered.

...

        (July 20th) I ordered the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry to take a position in rear of the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, and connect on the left with the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, also in reserve. After this formation was made, orders were received to have the men stack arms and make themselves as comfortable as possible; that a farther advance was not at that time necessary.

...

        (July 20th) Happily, the brigade on my left held its ground and repulsed the enemy. As soon as I became satisfied that my flank would not be turned, I ordered forward the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers to relieve the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, which was nearly exhausted by the extreme heat of the day and the severe fighting. The men had expended all their ammunition and supplied themselves from the cartridge-boxes of the dead and wounded rebels. On being relieved, the regiment fell back about fifty yards to the rear, where it took position in line of battle, ready to spring to their guns in case of necessity.

...

        (July 21st) This ended this severely contested engagement. To us it was a brilliant feat of arms. We encountered the enemy in superior numbers in the open field. We met his offensive attack with an offensive -turn; his charge with a countercharge. The victory was complete and decisive. He left his dead and wounded on the field and in our possession. The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin captured a stand of colors, and the skirmishers of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York a battle-flag. This brigade buried the bodies of 38 dead rebels found behind and near our advanced line of battle, among whom was 1 colonel (Drake, of Thirty-third Mississippi); 5 line officers captured, as many more severely wounded, 6 swords, and many stand of small-arms, of which no account was kept, denote the captures made by this and other brigades of this division. Of course such a victory could not be obtained without the sacrifice of valuable lives and the shedding of precious blood, although our loss is slight in comparison with the loss and havoc that were inflicted on the rebels. The men and officers of the brigade sustained their well-earned reputation for bravery and gallantry. Though the attack came upon them unexpectedly, they met it with cool deter-ruination and unflinching courage. Where all behaved well it may be regarded as invidious to call attention to individuals, yet it seems to me that I cannot discharge my whole duty in this respect without pointing out for special commendation the conduct of the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and its brave and able commander. The position of this regiment in the line was such that the brunt of the attack on this brigade fell upon it. The brave, skillful, and determined manner in which it met this attack, rolled back the onset, pressed forward in a countercharge, and drove back the enemy, could not be excelled by the troops in this or any other army, and is worthy of the highest commendation and praise. It is to be hoped that such conduct will be held up as an example for others, and will meet its appropriate reward.

...

                                                                      JAMES WOOD,
                                                                            JR., Colonel, Comdg. Third Brigade, Third Division, 20th Corps.

                                                                      Capt. ROBERT E. BEECHER,
                                                                            Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Division.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 270.--Reports of Lieut. Col. Philo B. Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Infantry.

...

        (July 21st) During our advance a rebel color bearer in front of the right of my regiment was killed, and a rebel officer, who sprang forward and seized the colors to bear them off, was also shot dead, but a soldier from the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin succeeded in obtaining the flag. During the action our division captured 7 stand of colors. The night following a formidable line of intrenchments was thrown up along the entire front of our corps, and the succeeding day was spent in burying our own and the dead of the enemy. The casualties in this regiment at the battle of Peach Tree Creek were as follows, viz: Commissioned officers wounded, 6; enlisted men killed, 8; wounded, 41.

...

                                                                        PHILO B. BUCKINGHAM,
                                                                                Lieut. Col., Comdg. Twentieth Regt. Connecticut Vol. Infty.

                                                                        Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
                                                                                A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 275.--Report of Lieut. Col. Samuel H. Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry.

...

        On the 17th of July we were thrown across the Chattahoochee and moved toward Buck Head. On the 20th of July we moved early and crossed Peach Tree Creek in the rear of General Newton s position, occupying a place in the second line. My regiment supported and relieved the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin during the engagement of this day, with a loss to the command of 18 officers and men.

...

                                                                        SAML. H. HURST,
                                                                                Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. 73d Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

                                                                        Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
                                                                                Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 43.--Report of Brig. Gen. William T. Ward, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division.
HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, TWENTIETH ARMY CORPS,
Cheves House, S. C., January 4, 1865.

COLONEL:
        I have the honor to submit the following report of operations of this division from the occupation of Atlanta, September 2, 1864, to the occupation of Savannah, December 21, 1864.
        September 2, a report has already been forwarded of the capture of Atlanta, and of the position of troops in the city; so that it is now unnecessary to repeat. The troops remained in the same position until September 23, when the First Brigade and one regiment, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin of the Third Brigade, were moved to the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochee River, where they remained until the commencement of the campaign just ended. Of the foraging parties sent out from Atlanta and the railroad bridge I know nothing myself, having been home on leave of absence. Inclosed I forward the report of Col. Daniel Dustin, One hundred and fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, who commanded the division during my absence, also the reports of assistant quartermaster and commissary of subsistence as to amounts of forage and subsistence taken from the country at that time. On the 5th day of December [November], pursuant to an order received from Major-General Slocum, the division moved out of town on the McDonough road, but was ordered to its old camp the next morning. One man from the Thirty-third Indiana was killed while on the skirmish line. On the 6th [9th] the enemy made a slight demonstration on our lines, fired a few shells, but retired without doing any damage. On the 13th day of November, pursuant to an order from corps headquarters, I ordered Colonel Smith, commanding First Brigade, to move his command toward the city, destroying the track of the railroad, until he met a party of the First Division working on the road from the town. This was done.
        Very respectfully, &c.,

                                                                        W. T. WARD,
                                                                                Brigadier-General, Comdg. Third Div., 20th Army Corps.

                                                                        Lieut. Col. H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 44.--Reports of Col. Daniel Dustin, One hundred and fifth Illinois Infantry, commanding Third Division.
HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., THIRD DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,
Savannah, Ga., December 26, 1864.

SIR:

        I have the honor to report the operations of the division during the time that I had the honor to command it, as follows:
        I assumed command on the 23d day of September, Brigadier-General Ward being absent on leave. I found the First Brigade in command of Colonel Smith, of the One hundred and second Illinois, the Second under Lieutenant-Colonel Bloodgood, of the Twenty-second Wisconsin, and the Third under Lieutenant-Colonel Buckingham, of the Twentieth Connecticut. The position of the command was not changed until the -----, when by order from corps headquarters the First Brigade was sent to the Chattahoochee River for the purpose of guarding the railroad bridge on the Chattanooga and Atlanta Railroad, and on the [8th of October] the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, of the Third Brigade, was also sent to the same place, reporting to Colonel Smith. The picket duty of the Second and Third Brigades consisted in guarding their front, extending from the McDonough road on the right, and connecting with the pickets of the Second Division to the Atlanta and Augusta Railroad on the left, and connecting with the pickets of the First Division.

...

                                                                        DANL. DUSTIN,
                                                                                Colonel 105th Illinois Volunteers, Comdg. Second Brigade.

                                                                        Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 46.--Report of Maj. Henry D. Brown, One hundred and fifth Illinois Infantry.
HDQRS. 105TH ILLINOIS INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS,
Savannah, Ga., December 21, 1864.

SIR:

        I have the honor to submit the following as a report of the part taken by my regiment in the late operations, commencing the 2d day of August [September], 1864, and ending with the present date:
        When the city of Atlanta was taken possession of by the troops of the Twentieth Corps, my regiment, then in command of Colonel Dustin, was left at the Chattahoochee River to guard the bridges and stores remaining there. After the 16th of September all the regiments of the First Brigade, except the One hundred and fifth, having moved down to Atlanta, this command, in connection with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry, did the duty at the river. Strong works were prepared and the utmost vigilance exercised to guard against guerrillas and marauders who infested the country thereabouts. Colonel Dustin assumed command of the brigade, in the absence of Colonel Harrison, on the 18th of September, when Lieutenant-Colonel Dutton commanded the regiment until the 9th of October, when, having received leave of absence, he left for Illinois. Since his absence I have had command.

...

                                                                        H. D. BROWN,
                                                                                Major, Commanding Regiment.

                                                                        Lieut. A. H. TREGO,
                                                                                Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 3d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 52.--Report of Col. Samuel Ross, Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.
HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., THIRD DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,
Savannah, Ga., December 27, 1864.

CAPTAIN:

        I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of this brigade since the last report, which embraced the occupation of Atlanta, September 2, 1864.
        The brigade was then encamped southeast of the city of Atlanta, Ga., and furnished daily large details for working parties on the fortifications. The Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers formed part of the provost guard of the city, and rejoined the brigade at Milledgeville on the 23d of November. On the 8th of October the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers was detached from the brigade to Col. F. C. Smith, One hundred and second Illinois Volunteers, commanding First Brigade, at the railroad bridge across the Chattahoochee River, and rejoined the brigade at Atlanta on the 14th of November.

...

                                                                        SAML. ROSS,
                                                                                Colonel Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, Comdg. Brigade.

                                                                        Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 4.--Itinerary of the Union Forces, January 1-June 30, 1865.

...

        April 10.--Again started on the campaign ending with the war at Raleigh, N. C. From thence the division marched on their homeward journey, passing through Richmond, Va., and Washington, D.C., at which last place the following regiments were mustered out of service: One hundred and second, One hundred and fifth, One hundred and twenty-ninth Illinois; Seventieth and Eighty-fifth Indiana; Seventy-ninth Ohio; Nineteenth Michigan; Thirty-third Massachusetts; Twenty-second and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin; Twentieth Connecticut, and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, the Thirty-third Indiana, Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Veteran Regiments being transferred to Fourteenth Army Corps. The last regiment mustered out [was] the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, closing the records of this division June 14.

...


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 197.--Reports of Bvt. Brig. Gen. William Cogswell, Second Massachusetts Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations January 16-March 21 and April 10-June 1.
HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., THIRD DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,
Goldsborough, N. C., March 30, 1865.

CAPTAIN:

        I have the honor to report that on the evening of January 16, 1865, I assumed command of this brigade, pursuant to section III, General Orders, No. 16, headquarters Twentieth Army Corps, Savannah, Ga., January 16, 1865. The brigade was then stationed at Hardee's Farm, S.C., and consisted of the following regiments: Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, Lieut. Col. Philo B. Buckingham commanding; Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry, Lieut. Col. Fred. C. Winkler commanding; Thirty-third Massachusetts Infantry, Lieut. Col. Elisha Doane commanding; Fifty-fifth Ohio Infantry, Lieut. Col. E. H. Powers commanding; Seventy-third Ohio Infantry, Lieut. Col. Samuel H. Hurst commanding; One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, Lieut. Col. L. B. Faulkner, afterward Maj. H. L. Arnold, commanding. The effective force of the command was at that time, officers, 88; enlisted men, 1,399. On the morning of the 17th four regiments of the brigade moved to Hardeeville on the Union Causeway, two regiments, the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, remaining to guard the division supply train from the Savannah River to this latter place. These two regiments joined the brigade on the following day, the 18th. The brigade was encamped on the south side of the town of Hardeeville, where drills, guard mountings, and dress parades were resumed and the camp put into as tolerable condition as the nature of the ground and weather would admit, until the morning of the 29th, when, at 7 o'clock, it broke camp and marched north and easterly toward Robertsville. S. C., to a point seven miles south of the latter place. January 30, marched to Robertsville and encamped on the south side of that town. January 31, the brigade moved about one mile and a half from the camp of the day before on the Sister's Ferry road, relieving the First Brigade, First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, Colonel Selfridge commanding, and holding that road.

...

        February 22, at 7 a.m. marched unencumbered and crossed the Wateree Creek and moved to Rocky Mount on the Wateree River, and at 12 o'clock that night the brigade crossed the river and bivouacked. At 7.30 a.m., the 23d, moved three miles north of river on the Lancaster road and encamped for the day. At the river Lieutenant-Colonel Winkler, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, hearing of two Union officers, escaped prisoners, who were secreted in this vicinity, was directed to send a company for them, and succeeded in bringing them safely to our army.

...

        March 14, the brigade was ordered to make a reconnaissance on the Raleigh road to Taylor's Hole Creek, and on the Goldsborough or Tarborough road to the South or Black River. At 9 a.m. the brigade moved out in light marching order, leaving its camps behind and reaching the advance camps of Fifty-fifth Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts, was joined by them, and also the One hundred and second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, First Brigade of this division, Major Clay commanding, moved to the Goldsborough or Tarborough road. The Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio, and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio, were ordered to proceed on the latter road to Great Creek, and Colonel Hurst was directed to cross that creek if he could and there to await further orders, while the Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers, Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers, and One hundred and second Illinois Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers, were ordered to proceed to Taylor's Hole Creek, on the Raleigh road, if possible. I proceeded with this latter column about four miles, and the enemy was met first at Evon's Creek. In a few moments, however, and after slight dispositions on our part, he left. The creek was crossed, and everything progressing favorably for some two miles beyond. I directed Colonel Buckingham to keep moving on carefully and to gain Taylor's Hole Creek if he could do so with his skirmish line, but not to engage his line of battle. (For a fuller and more particular report of this most satisfactory reconnaissance on the part of Colonel Buckingham I refer you to his inclosed report. Then taking a by-road through woods I joined the column with Colonel Hurst at Great Creek. No opposition as yet had been met. Leaving four companies of the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, Major Lackner commanding, to hold a main road on my left, I took the nearest road to Black or South River, and proceeded three miles to within a few hundred rods of that river without opposition, here deploying five companies of the Fifty-fifth Ohio as skirmishers. I advanced them to the river bank, driving the enemy's cavalry across that place and engaging his skirmishers in a hot fire for twenty minutes. Having observed the river and calling forth artillery fire from four different pieces, the skirmishers were withdrawn and the column moved back to its camps, having marched a distance of from twenty-one to twenty-two miles. In the engagement the casualties were 1 slightly, I mortally, wounded in Fifty-fifth Ohio. March 15, moved (unencumbered) on the Raleigh road; crossed Silver Run and Taylor's Hole Creek and encamped at the latter place

...

        Early in the morning of the 17th the picket reported the evacuation of their main line by the enemy and their occupation of the same. Soon after the brigade with its division moved four miles and a half or five miles to Averasborough, and remained during the day and night. The Twentieth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Buckingham, was sent one mile and a half on the Raleigh road to hold and picket the same. The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Winkler commanding, was sent at the same time on the Smithville road to hold and picket the same.

...

        On p.m. of 20th moved to the extreme left of the line about one mile and fortified. On the morning of the 21st, with Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Winkler commanding, and Thirty-third Massachusetts Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Doane commanding, and the picket-line of the brigade, moved out a mile to the front, drew a few shots from the enemy, but gained no important information.

...

                                                                        W. M. COGSWELL,
                                                                                Brevet Brigadier-General, Commanding Brigade.

                                                                        Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 198.--Reports of Lieut. Col. Philo B. Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, of operations January 16-March 24.

...

        At 8 a.m. on the 19th we resumed the march in rear of the train, and about 1 p.m. we left the train and moved rapidly forward till about 3 p.m., when we reached a point near Bentonville, N. C., where the enemy had attacked a portion of the Fourteenth Corps, and the brigade was almost immediately formed on the right of the road leading toward Goldsborough, the Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers occupying the left of the line of the brigade, with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers in column in our immediate rear. In this position we were ordered to advance and relieve a brigade of the Fourteenth Corps, supposed to be in our immediate front. The regiment advanced with the brigade line through the woods for twenty or thirty rods, then across a swamp, when we emerged into an open wood of heavy pine timber, and some twenty rods from the swamp was a thick growth of underbrush directly in our front. After advancing nearly to the edge of the heavy pine forest we received a tremendous volley from the enemy, whose lines were concealed not more than a dozen rods from us, behind the underbrush, which was immediately returned.

...

                                                                        PHILO B. BUCKINGHAM,
                                                                                Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment.

                                                                        Capt. H. G. H. TARR,
                                                                                Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 199.--Report of Lieut. Col. Elisha Doane, Thirty-third Massachusetts Infantry, of operations January 16-March 24.

...

        On the morning of the 22d, the Thirty-third, with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, made a reconnaissance of the extreme right of the enemy; some shots were exchanged, after which we returned to our works, with the loss of one enlisted man wounded. In the afternoon we returned to our position of the previous day.

...

                                                                        ELISHA DOANE,
                                                                                Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 200.--Report of Capt. George H. Eldridge, One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, of operations January 16-March 24.
HDQRS. 136TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEER INFANTRY,
Goldsborough, N. C., March 25, 1865.

CAPTAIN:

        Pursuant to circular of this date, calling for report of operations since 16th of January, I have the honor to state that on the 16th of January, when the Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, marched from Cheves' farm, this regiment, with Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, was detailed to remain for the purpose of guarding a wagon train that had been sent to the landing for supplies.

...

                                                                        G. H. ELDRIDGE,
                                                                                Captain, Commanding 136th New York Volunteer Infantry.

                                                                        Capt. H. G. H. TARR,
                                                                                Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/3 [S# 100]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA, SOUTHERN GEORGIA, AND EAST FLORIDA, FROM MARCH 24, 1865, TO JUNE 30, 1865.--#4

I. In order to equalize the means of transportation in the army the following-named transfers will be made immediately: From Fourteenth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 7. From Fifteenth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 190; ambulances and teams complete, 58. From Seventeenth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 7; ambulances and teams complete, 11. From Twentieth Army Corps, wagons and teams complete, 81--to be transferred to the Army of the Ohio. In making these transfers the worst animals, wagons, ambulances, harness, &c., will not be selected, but an average number as regards condition must be transferred from each corps. A board of officers, to consist of Colonel Parry, Forty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Lieut. Col. W. J. Jordan, One hundred and fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Maj. Francis Lacknet, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, will assemble at the office of the chief quartermaster April 4, 12 m., to inspect the property when transferred, and report on its condition and whether these orders have been properly carried out. Major-General Schofield will designate a quartermaster of his command to receive and account for the property so transferred.

By order of Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman:

                                                                        L. M. DAYTON,
                                                                                Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/1 [S# 107]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland, Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern), And West Virginia, From January 1, 1861, To June 30, 1865.--#24
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 47.
HDQRS. DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON,
October 27, 1862.

1. The Eleventh Corps will be reorganized by its commanding general as follows: First Division, to be commanded by Brigadier-General Stahel. First Brigade, to be commanded by Col. Leopold von Gilsa, Forty-first New York--Forty-first, Forty-fifth, Eighth, and Fifty-fourth New York; Second Brigade, to be commanded by Col. N. C. McLean, Seventy-fifth Ohio--Twenty-fifth, Fifty-fifth, Seventy-fifth, and Eighty-second Ohio. This division, with the three batteries constituting the reserve artillery of the corps and the cavalry attached to the corps, will constitute the division of reserve. Second Division, to be commanded by Brig. Gen. A. von Steinwehr. First Brigade, to be commanded by Colonel Buschbeck, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania--Twenty-seventh and Seventy-third Pennsylvania, Twenty-ninth and One hundred and fifty-fourth New York; Second Brigade, to be commanded by Colonel Smith, Seventy-third Ohio--Sixty first and Seventy-third Ohio, Thirty-third Massachusetts, and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York. Artillery of the division, two batteries. Third Division, to be commanded by Brig. Gen. Carl Schurz. First Brigade, to be commanded by Colonel Schimmelfennig, Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania--Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania, Sixty-eighth, One hundred and thirty-sixth, and One hundred and fifty-seventh New York; Second Brigade, to be commanded by Col. W. Krzyzanowski, Fifty-eighth New York--Fifty-eighth and One hundred and nineteenth New York, Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin. Artillery of the division, two batteries. The commanding general of the Eleventh Corps will immediately report to these headquarters what batteries he assigns to the reserve and to each division, with the names of the battery commanders and the number and caliber of guns.

* * * * * * * * * *

By command of Major-General Banks:

                                                                   RICHD. B. IRWIN,
                                                                          Captain, Aide-de-Camp, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.