136th New York Infantry Volunteers 
Partial Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 136th New York Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 251. -- Report of Col. Orland Smith,
Seventy-third Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade.

                                                                            HDQRS. SECOND BRIG, SECOND DIV., ELEVENTH A C.,
                                                                            Near Catlett's Station, Va., August 5, 1863.

LIEUTENANT:

        I have the honor to report the operations of the Second Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh Corps, from June 12 to July 4, beginning with its departure from Brooke's Station and ending with the battle of Gettysburg.
        The brigade, consisting of the Seventy-third Ohio, Thirty-third Massachusetts, Fifty-fifth Ohio, and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, marched from its encampment at Brooke's Station on Friday, June 12, at 1 p.m. Its marches and halts until its arrival at Gettysburg were as follows:
        Friday, June 12.--Brooke's Station to Hartwood Church, 13 miles.
        Saturday, June 13.--From Hartwood Church to Weaverville, near Catlett's.

...

        On the march from Emmitsburg to Gettysburg, this brigade brought up the rear of the entire corps; consequently it was the last to arrive at the scene of action, which had been commenced earlier in the day by the First Corps.
        In compliance with orders from General Steinwehr commanding the division, I immediately formed the brigade in line of battle by battalions in mass in rear of Cemetery Hill, and thus advanced through the cemetery to the front of the hill overlooking the town. It was soon evident our forces, consisting of the First Corps and First and Third Divisions, Eleventh Corps, were retreating before vastly superior numbers from the opposite side of the town. The moment seemed critical, and, under the directions of the general, dispositions were rapidly made to repel any assault upon the hill should the enemy see fit to advance so far. The movements and deployments were made with considerable rapidity, and positions were frequently made by changes, as will be indicated by the reports of the regimental commanders, which are herewith submitted.
        The final disposition of the brigade was as follows: The base of the hill in front of the batteries of the corps was occupied by the Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers and the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, the former being on the extreme right, and reaching to the southwest corner of the town, the Seventy-third in the center, and the One hundred and thirty-sixth on the left, connecting with the Second Corps. The Thirty-third Massachusetts was placed on the northeasterly side of Cemetery Hill, and, as I learned from the report of Colonel Underwood, was put temporarily under the command of General Ames, of the First Division, this, however, being the first intimation to me of such a fact.

...

        Where all vied with each other in the performance of their respective duties, it is impossible to single out officers for special mention. I desire, however, to express my entire satisfaction at the conduct of the regimental commanders--Lieut. Col. R. Long, of the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers; Col. C. B. Gambee, of the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers; Col. A. B. Underwood, of the Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers, and Col. James Wood, jr., of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers--all of whom, by their vigilance and watchfulness, contributed to lighten my own cares and responsibilities.
        I cannot forbear mentioning with commendation the members of my staff--Capt. Benjamin F. Stone, jr., acting assistant adjutant-general; Capt. J. D. Maderia, acting assistant inspector-general; Capt. E. H. Pratt, and Lieut. H. E. Van Zandt, acting aides-de-camp, whose constant attention and ready response to all-calls in seasons of the greatest danger entitle them to the greatest praise.
        In closing, I venture to express the opinion that the arrival of this brigade upon Cemetery Hill at a critical moment, in good order and with full ranks, contributed much toward checking the enemy's advancing forces, and resulted in holding the hill, which, in my own opinion, was of the most vital importance, as was demonstrated by the subsequent actions.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                                            ORLAND SMITH,
                                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

                                                                            Lieut. R. E. BEECHER,
                                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]
NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 101.--Report of Col. Orland Smith, Seventy-third Ohio Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, including march to the relief of Knoxville.

...

        Pursuant to orders, the brigade marched from its position in Lookout Valley at I p.m., on 22d November. The only transportation taken was one wagon containing intrenching tools and the ambulance assigned to brigade headquarters. The men carried their knapsacks, blankets, shelter tents, three days' rations, and 60 rounds of ammunition. The line of march was in the direction of Chattanooga, via Brown's Ferry. The strength of the column was as follows: Officers, 63; enlisted men, 1,086; total, 1,149.
        The following regiments composed the brigade: Seventy-third Ohio Volunteers, Fifty-fifth Ohio, Thirty-third Massachusetts, and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers. The passage of two pontoon bridges being necessarily attended with some delay, the position assigned for encampment, in front of Chattanooga, to the right of Fort Wood, was not reached till near night.
        On Monday, November 23, I was directed to hold my brigade in readiness to move at 1 p.m., at which time it was formed in column of battalion en masse, and took position on the right of the Third Division, similarly formed, the First Brigade, Second Division, being in our rear. In this position the whole corps remained in reserve, while a division of the Fourth Corps made a demonstration toward Mission Ridge. After this division had established its position upon Orchard Knob we were ordered to move in conjunction with the rest of the corps to the left, and to advance to Citico Creek. After marching some distance to the left of Fort Wood the brigade was formed in two lines, the first line being composed of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York and the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, deployed: the second, consisting of the Seventy-third Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers, in column of division en masse. The front line having been covered by skirmishers, the brigade was ordered forward, connecting on its left with the First Brigade and on its right expecting to connect with the Third Division. The advance regiments soon came up with a regiment of Beatty's brigade, Fourth Corps, then on picket. Passing and relieving the skirmishers of this regiment, our skirmishers were soon briskly engaged with those of the enemy. They pressed on rapidly, however, returning but few shots, the enemy fleeing as they advanced. As the enemy's fire increased in intensity both skirmishers and the main line seemed disposed to rush forward with impetuosity, all moving at double-quick but in perfect order. After crossing the Chattanooga and Atlanta railroad, finding my brigade opening large intervals between itself and its connections on the right and left, and Citico Creek having been given as the limit of our advance, I deemed it prudent to order a halt. Our skirmishers had forced those of the enemy from a brick house in our front, from which they had kept up a brisk fire; but the advance had not been quite far enough to dislodge them from some rifle-pits which they occupied, and from which their sharpshooters continued to annoy us. Reconnoitering our position I found that Citico Creek ran at right angles to the railroad, along which our line was partly formed, and that it ceased to be a creek of any importance after passing the railroad in the direction of Mission Ridge. The enemy occupied a line of rifle-pits running from the direction of the mouth of the creek across the railroad, thence sweeping around our front toward our extreme right. While this brought those on the opposite bank of the creek directly in opposition to the regiments of the First Brigade, it afforded them an opportunity to annoy our left flank and rear. At nightfall, I therefore changed the direction of the left wing of the Fifty-fifth Ohio to correspond, and advanced a part of the Thirty-third Massachusetts to establish complete connection with the First Brigade. Meantime the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, of the Third Division, had been brought forward to connect with the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York on our right. On this line intrenchments were formed and the position held without material change all the next day (November 24).
        On the afternoon of the 24th, in compliance with orders, the Seventy-third Ohio was thrown across Citico Creek, where it is crossed by the Chattanooga and Cleveland railroad, with instructions to drive the enemy from their rifle-pits in front of the First Brigade, the fire from which had been very annoying. The work assigned this regiment was performed promptly and successfully, resulting in the capture of some 30 prisoners.

...

        During the entire movement, from the 22d November to the 17th December, I noticed no officer who faltered in the performance of his duty.
        It affords me pleasure to mention favorably the names of the respective regimental commanders in the brigade. Col. James Wood, jr., One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, who, though unsupported by any other field officer, carried his regiment through the whole campaign in fine order. Col. C. B. Gambee, Fifty-fifth Ohio; Lieut. Col. Godfrey Rider, jr., Thirty-third Massachusetts, and Maj. S. H. Hurst, commanding Seventy-third Ohio. I desire also to make especial mention of Capt. Thomas W. Higgins, senior captain of the Seventy-third Ohio, who on this occasion, as on many previous, displayed great energy, perseverance, and gallantry. The captain has acted as major for some time past with marked success, and I think the rank of major, by brevet, would be judiciously bestowed upon him.

...

                                                                            ORLAND SMITH,
                                                                                    Colonel Seventy-third Ohio Vols., Comdg. Second Brigade.

                                                                            Lieut. R. E. BEECHER,
                                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]
NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 102.--Report of Lieut. Col. Godfrey Rider, jr., Thirty-third Massachusetts Infantry, including march to the relief of Knoxville.

...

        November 23, at noon, formed in column and marched in line of battle to the enemy, threw out our pickets, made rifle-pits, and held the position in front of the enemy.
        November 25, advanced in front to the railroad, made strong breastworks, and skirmished some with the enemy. At or near noon marched down to the left of the line of battle to join General Sherman; formed line of battle, left wing on the railroad and the right wing perpendicular to it, joining the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York; threw up strong breastworks, and posted pickets in front of our lines.
        November 26, took up our line of march and proceeded beyond Chickamauga and halted for the night, having formed numerous lines of battle during the day.
        November 27, marched in column, with flankers on our right, to Red Clay Station, where we formed in line of battle between the Fifty-fifth Ohio on our left and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York on our right; threw out pickets on our flanks and beyond the right of the brigade; tore up several hundred yards of the railroad, and destroyed the sleepers and rails by large fires. Hence we marched back some 6 miles, more or less, and halted for the night.

...

                                                                            GODFREY RIDER, JR.,
                                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel, Comdg. Thirty-third Massachusetts.

                                                                            Capt. B. F. STONE,
                                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/2 [S# 55]
NOVEMBER 23-27, 1863.--The Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign.
No. 104.--Report of Col. Charles B. Gambee, Fifty-fifth Ohio Infantry, including march to the relief of Knoxville.

...

        At 1 p.m. of November 23, I received orders to put the regiment under arms. The Eleventh Corps were massed near Fort Wood; a short time afterward they were marched to the left of the line of battle, the Second Brigade, Second Division, being directly on the left of the Third Division. The Fifty-fifth Regiment were deployed in line of battle with two companies as skirmishers, covering their whole front. The One hundred and thirty-sixth New York was on the right and the First Brigade, Second Division, on the left. The order being given to advance, the regiment moved forward with spirit and determination. The skirmish line, when passing through a narrow belt of woods, came in contact with the enemy, and the first salutation received was a volley of musketry, which, however, did not impede the forward movement of the regiment one particle. Passing through the woods we came to an open field, over which the regiment charged at a double-quick under a heavy fire from the front and flank, and did not halt until commanded to do so and ordered to take position behind a railroad embankment. The skirmish line drove the enemy into their breastworks. During the night four companies were on the skirmish line.

...

                                                                            C. B. GAMBEE,
                                                                                    Colonel Fifty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

                                                                            Capt. B. F. STONE,
                                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]
Ops. in Kentucky, Southwest Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, and North Georgia.--Jan. 1-April 30, 1864.
No. 2. --Itinerary of the Army of the Cumberland, commanded by Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, U.S. Army, January 1-April 30.

...

        From these regiments there remained here the following numbers of men, who either were debarred the privilege of re-en-listing by the limited term of their previous service or were unwilling to re-enlist: From the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 185 men, transferred to the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; from the Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 118 men, and from the Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 16 men, in all 134 men who were transferred to the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers.

...


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 248.--Reports of Brig. Gen. William T. Ward, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division.

...

        On the 20th instant I was ordered to march my division up in support of Generals Williams and Geary. Before the position was gained the order was changed; I was to fill up the gap between General Geary's left and the right of the Fourth Army Corps. After looking over the ground, I determined to cross the creek on a bridge in rear of General Newton's division. There was a high hill that completely hid my movements from the enemy, and at the same time it protected the main body of the troops, whilst the skirmishers were driving the rebel pickets from the ridge and valley which I was to occupy. The Twenty-second Wisconsin and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York drove the enemy's skirmishers and covered the commanding ground which I intended to occupy by forming line of battle. The troops now moved into the corn-field and formed at the foot of the hill in the following order: First Brigade on right, Second Brigade in center, Third Brigade on left. General Hooker, through Captain Hall, aide-de-camp, ordered that the division remain where it was until further orders. About 3 p.m. Colonel Coburn reported to me that the enemy was advancing upon us in strong force. I immediately dispatched staff officers to order the brigade commanders to move their commands rapidly to the high ground in our front. The division moved at once in splendid order. The skirmish line, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Bloodgood, of the Twenty-second Wisconsin, behaved most gallantly, refusing to fall back until sorely pressed by the rebel line of battle, and then only they retreated slowly, reluctantly yielding ground, disputing every foot they gave up. They had fallen back to the ridge covering the division, followed closely by the rebel line: When my line of battle reached them Colonel Bloodgood drew his men to the rear of the main line, and the battle began in earnest. The first line of the rebels was shattered in a few minutes, my advance was hardly checked a minute, the enemy had evidently believed themselves in a gap between General Geary and the Fourth Army Corps. Meeting my line of battle seemed to completely addle their brains. Their first line broke, mixing up with the second line; they were now in the wildest confusion, firing in all directions, some endeavoring to get away, some undecided what to do, others rushing into our lines. I still advanced my men, keeping up a steady fire, crossed a deep ravine to gain the next hill to make good my connections with General Newton on my left and General Geary on my right, and also to gain a position which commanded the open country for 600 yards in advance. Once they had made a feeble effort to rally, but they were too badly broken. They succeeded in making a slight attack, but it was not a concerted movement; it commenced on the left, running at intervals toward the right. It only resulted in giving us more prisoners, 2 more battle flags, and swelling the already frightful number of rebel dead and wounded. They then fled to the woods, leaving dead, wounded, and arms in our possession. I took up the chosen position and commenced to fortify it. The enemy was rallying his men in the woods, keeping up a constant fire on our lines, and made several attempts to charge. We returned the fire vigorously, repulsed the charges' before they got far out of the woods. This was kept up briskly until 6 p.m., when the fire began to abate, but a brisk skirmishing fire was kept up until dark. The ambulance corps worked faithfully all night carrying off the wounded of both armies. Soon after daybreak on the 21st all were cared for. My division in this battle had no artillery, it having been impossible to move it across the country. Captain Gary had his batteries on the Buck Head road, where he was put in position by General Thomas. There he did good service in protecting General Newton's left flank. In the beginning of the battle Major-General Thomas sent to me for a brigade to assist General Newton; as my whole line was hotly engaged and only a portion of one regiment (One hundred and thirty-sixth New York) in reserve, I begged to be excused from parting with any portion of my command. General Thomas, so soon as he learned how I was situated, revoked the order, but requested me to send two regiments; this could not be done, as it would have made a gap in my line that would probably have proved fatal to my division, if not to the entire corps. General Thomas withdrew the request when the facts were communicated to him. During the engagement my troops never wavered, although troops to the right and to the left of them gave way: At night-fall, however, the rest of the corps and Newton's division, of the Fourth Corps, had re-established themselves in their old positions. The fight in my front lasted for three hours or more. To my brigade commanders, Colonel Harrison, Seventieth Indiana (First), Colonel Coburn, Thirty-third Indiana(Second), and Colonel Wood, One hundred and thirty-sixth New York (Third), I am indebted for their prompt obedience of orders, for their gallant and unwavering support in the discharge of duties as commanding officers. Each handled his command well and in a manner alike creditable to himself and to the service. To all the members of my staff I am indebted for their efficient manner in conveying orders to the various parts of this bloody field. Especially am I indebted to Major Lackner, Captains Speed and Tebbetts, Lieutenants Harryman and Thompson for their services on this day. In this engagement my division captured 7 battle-flags, 25 officers' swords, and a large number of small-arms, 114 prisoners, and 132 wounded rebels, sent to hospital. These prisoners represented seventeen different regiments, from Loring's and Walker's divisions; 1 man was from Cheatham's. The estimated loss of the enemy in my front was 500 killed, 2,500 wounded, and 246 prisoners. My loss in killed, wounded, and missing, 551. July 21 was spent in burying the dead and caring for the wounded. The enemy's pickets were in the opposite woods, but fired little and without effect. On the 22d I was ordered to move my command on left of Buck Head and Atlanta road, toward the city. This I did, making connection with the left of General Wood's (Third Division, Fourth Army Corps) skirmish line. I moved on until halted by an order from General Hooker to take up position and fortify. This was done, my right connecting with General Geary, my left with Fourth Army Corps. On the 23d I advanced my line, thereby shortening it. Division remained stationary until 27th of July, when General Geary relieved my division and it was placed in reserve. On the 28th General Williams assumed command of the corps, General Hooker having been relieved at his own request. At about 5 p.m. General Williams, through his aide-de-camp, Lieutenant Robinson, ordered me to move to the right to support the Army of the Tennessee, which was heavily engaged. After marching about a mile and a half the order was countermanded, and I moved back to the old camp in rear of the corps. On the morning of the 29th I marched to the extreme right of the army to support General Davis' division in a reconnaissance; I moved in his rear, when he halted for the night. I went into camp, throwing up works. On the 30th I was ordered by Major-General Thomas to take up a refused position on the right of General Morgan's (commanding Davis') division. This I did, and threw up a strong line of rifle-pits. August 2, I was ordered to move back to the center of the line and hold my command in readiness to relieve Fourteenth Army Corps (except brigade on right) at daylight next morning. My troops were ready at the appointed time, but it was fully 10 o'clock before the Fourteenth Army Corps was ready to leave the works. When they moved out my command moved in. The pickets were relieved, and I immediately commenced to straighten the lines. I pushed the lines forward from 300 yards to three-quarters of a mile, building three sets of pits and forts, using a great deal of labor to strengthen the position to counterbalance my thin line of men. The pickets made a truce; did not fire on one another. This was fortunate, as we had been losing a number of our men by the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters. Artillery firing was kept up at intervals, but the practice of the enemy was very poor, doing little or no damage to our works, killing and wounding out few of our men.

...

                                                                            W. T. WARD,
                                                                                    Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

                                                                            Lieut. Col. H. W. PERKINS,
                                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General, Twentieth Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 252.--Reports of Col. Benjamin Harrison, Seventieth Indiana Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of operations July 20-September 5.

...

        In front of my two regiments of the front line on the right there was quite a steep bluff, after rising which there was a level field cultivated in corn some 400 yards across, and beyond which the ground again sloped down toward the bed of a small creek. Between these two regiments and the left regiment of the front line a small stream ran from the southwest, upon which, about 300 yards from where  we lay, was a grist-mill. Upon the left of this creek immediately in front of our lines was a low ridge covered with small pines, and still beyond this and a ravine which intervened was a high cleared ridge, which was the line finally occupied by our troops. This ridge was the key point to the whole position. If held by the enemy we should have been forced to retire beyond Peach Tree Creek. At this time I received orders to relieve the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteer Infantry, then covering my front as skirmishers, by a detail from my brigade when the advance should commence. One hundred men, chiefly Spencer riflemen, from the Seventy-ninth Ohio and One hundred and second Illinois Volunteers, under the command of Captain Williamson, Seventy-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, were detailed for this duty and held in readiness to advance when orders should be received. While thus formed and waiting I met Colonel Coburn, commanding Second Brigade, who informed me that his skirmishers reported the enemy advancing to attack us and suggested that our line ought to be advanced to the crest of the small ridge which extended itself in front of his line and a portion of the left of my brigade.

...

                                                                            BENJA. HARRISON,
                                                                                    Colonel, Commanding First Brigade.

                                                                            Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 253.--Reports of Col. Franklin C. Smith, One hundred and second Illinois Infantry.

...

        On the 20th of June Company B of my regiment was deployed as skirmishers in front of the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, of the Third Brigade, losing on that day 1 killed and 1 wounded. On the 22d of June the brigade was ordered forward in support of the Third Brigade; casualties of the day, 3 wounded. On the morning of July 3 my regiment, having the advance of the division, was deployed in line of battle, with two companies as skirmishers, under Capt. D. W. Sedwick; was moved forward in the direction of Marietta, encountering in our advance the rear guard of the enemy, or a portion of it, consisting of 1,000 cavalry, with which a brisk skirmish was kept up, my skirmishers driving the cavalry through the town of Marietta, when we were halted during an engagement between Gary's battery and a battery of the enemy, after which we moved forward, passing to the right of the town. Nothing further of importance occurred until the afternoon of the 20th of July, when we were put in line of battle, my regiment holding the right of the brigade and also of the division under the cover of a ridge or hill south of Peach Tree Creek. We were ordered forward by Colonel Harrison, commanding the brigade, to take a position on the crest of the ridge. The enemy was discovered advancing in heavy column in a direction toward the left of the brigade and moved directly in front of the Seventy-ninth Ohio and One hundred and twenty-ninth Illinois and the Seventieth Indiana, occupying on this occasion the left of the brigade, the One hundred and fifth Illinois moving forward in the rear as a support or reserve line, the shock of the charge falling heaviest on the One hundred and twenty-ninth Illinois and the Seventy-ninth Ohio. There being no enemy in our immediate front we changed our position by wheeling slightly toward the left and opened upon the advancing column an enfilading fire, pouring volley after volley in quick succession, such as the Spencer rifle alone can give, until we had the proud satisfaction of seeing the enemy vanquished and seeking safety in flight. From the favorable position of the regiment during this sanguinary engagement we dealt upon our enemy severe punishment with trifling loss to ourselves, losing 2 killed and 10 wounded. Nothing of importance occurred from this time up to the 16th of August.
        I cannot well close this report of the operations of my regiment during this campaign, unparalleled for its duration and severity of labor, without expressing my profound satisfaction with the gallant conduct of my men, who, actuated by the highest motives of patriotism, have borne its fatigues and exposures, performing long and rapid marches, and laboring upon fortifications under the blistering rays of the sun as well as during the pelting storm, night as well as day, often upon short rations, without a murmur, always facing the enemy and never yielding an inch of ground, and at all times unshrinkingly facing the hazards and dangers of war.
        I am, very respectfully, yours,

                                                                            F. C. SMITH,
                                                                                    Colonel 102d Illinois Infantry.

                                                                            Col. BENJAMIN HARRISON,
                                                                                    Commanding First Brigade.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 261.--Reports of Col. John Coburn, Thirty-third Indiana Infantry, commanding Second Brigade.

...

        July 20. the brigade, in advance of and with the division, moved toward Atlanta, due south, and at 11 a.m. crossed Peach Tree Creek with the division at a point bridged by Newton's division, of the Fourth Corps, our division having orders to fill the interval between Newton's division and Geary's division, of the Twentieth Corps, which crossed to our right and below us. The pickets of the enemy occupied-the position we were ordered to assume. Two regiments were ordered to advance as skirmishers. My brigade furnished the Twenty-second Wisconsin, under command of Lieut. Col. Edward Bloodgood, who promptly advanced, covering almost the entire front and leaving but a small space for the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, of the Third Brigade. The skirmishers of the enemy were driven off and pursued nearly half a mile from out the valley and over a low range of hills to the south, where the skirmishers halted, joining to those of the Fourth Corps on the left and of General Geary on the right, who likewise advanced. Peach Tree Creek is a narrow and muddy stream, about forty feet wide and very deep, varying from four to twelve feet, and impassable, except by bridges.

...

                                                                            JOHN COBURN,
                                                                                    Colonel Thirty-third Indiana, Commanding Brigade.

                                                                            Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Division, Twentieth Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 270.--Reports of Lieut. Col. Philo B. Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Infantry.

...

        The enemy was soon discovered, not only advancing at a charge in our front, but also to our left, against the Fourth Corps, and two companies on my left were ordered to face the flank of the enemy and open fire in that direction, while the remaining companies maintained a determined fire against the three lines of the enemy advancing in our front. The attack was repulsed and the enemy fell back in confusion, and, although repeated charges were made during the afternoon, our lines remained firm and immovable. In the early part of the action the Fifty-fifth Ohio was moved from the second line to our left, to fill the space between our left and the right of the Fourth Corps. The regiment stood for four hours in the open field and fought with most determined courage, and both officers and men are entitled to praise for their coolness and steadiness during this most obstinate battle. The regiment was relieved by the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York about sundown, after having fired 150 rounds of ammunition per man, and after the muskets had become so foul from use as to be almost entirely unserviceable. On being relieved we fell back a short distance and remained under fire, supporting the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, until the enemy retired. Soon after dark the enemy fell back, leaving his dead and wounded on the field. Wounded rebel officers belonging to the Third, Thirty-third, Fifty-fifth [Thirty-fifth?], and Forty-fourth Mississippi Regiments, left on the field in front of the Twentieth, remarked that they had lost more men during this engagement in killed and wounded than they had before during the war. During our advance a rebel color bearer in front of the right of my regiment was killed, and a rebel officer, who sprang forward and seized the colors to bear them off, was also shot dead, but a soldier from the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin succeeded in obtaining the flag. During the action our division captured 7 stand of colors.

...

                                                                            PHILO B. BUCKINGHAM,
                                                                                    Lieut. Col., Comdg. Twentieth Regt. Connecticut Vol. Infty.

                                                                            Capt. C. H. YOUNG,
                                                                                    A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 3d Div., 20th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/1 [S# 77]
SEPTEMBER 29-NOVEMBER 13, 1864.--Operations in North Georgia and North Alabama.
No. 52.--Report of Col. Samuel Ross, Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.

...

        On the 5th of November, 1864, this brigade moved with the balance of the corps two miles on the McDonough road, where it remained until noon of the next day, and returned to its former encampment. On the morning of the 9th of November the enemy advanced toward our lines with cavalry and artillery, evidently supposing that the army had left Atlanta. A field battery opened fire; some small-arms were used. The affair was simply a demonstration on the part of the enemy, and no casualties were reported in this command. In the afternoon of the same day Colonel Ross, Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers, rejoined the brigade and assumed command, relieving Lieutenant-Colonel Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers, who had been in command since the departure of Colonel Wood, One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, on leave of absence September 23, 1864.
        I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                                            SAML. ROSS,
                                                                                    Colonel Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, Comdg. Brigade.

                                                                            Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 4.--Itinerary of the Union Forces, January 1-June 30, 1865.

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        April 10.--Again started on the campaign ending with the war at Raleigh, N. C. From thence the division marched on their homeward journey, passing through Richmond, Va., and Washington, D.C., at which last place the following regiments were mustered out of service: One hundred and second, One hundred and fifth, One hundred and twenty-ninth Illinois; Seventieth and Eighty-fifth Indiana; Seventy-ninth Ohio; Nineteenth Michigan; Thirty-third Massachusetts; Twenty-second and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin; Twentieth Connecticut, and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, the Thirty-third Indiana, Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio Veteran Regiments being transferred to Fourteenth Army Corps. The last regiment mustered out [was] the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, closing the records of this division June 14.

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        June 10.--The Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was mustered out of service as an organization. Those of the regiment who were not entitled to be mustered out were transferred to the Second Massachusetts Veteran Volunteers.
        The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, those of the regiment who were not entitled to be mustered out being transferred to the Third Wisconsin Veteran Volunteer Infantry.
        The One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteer Infantry, those men not entitled to be mustered out being transferred to the Sixtieth New York Veteran Volunteer Infantry.
        The Twentieth Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, and those of this regiment not entitled to muster out being transferred to the Fifth Connecticut Veteran Volunteer Infantry.

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O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 197.--Reports of Bvt. Brig. Gen. William Cogswell, Second Massachusetts Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations January 16-March 21 and April 10-June 1.

                                                                            HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., THIRD DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,
                                                                            Goldsborough, N. C., March 30, 1865.

CAPTAIN:

        I have the honor to report that on the evening of January 16, 1865, I assumed command of this brigade, pursuant to section III, General Orders, No. 16, headquarters Twentieth Army Corps, Savannah, Ga., January 16, 1865. The brigade was then stationed at Hardee's Farm, S.C., and consisted of the following regiments: Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, Lieut. Col. Philo B. Buckingham commanding; Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry, Lieut. Col. Fred. C. Winkler commanding; Thirty-third Massachusetts Infantry, Lieut. Col. Elisha Doane commanding; Fifty-fifth Ohio Infantry, Lieut. Col. E. H. Powers commanding; Seventy-third Ohio Infantry, Lieut. Col. Samuel H. Hurst commanding; One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, Lieut. Col. L. B. Faulkner, afterward Maj. H. L. Arnold, commanding. The effective force of the command was at that time, officers, 88; enlisted men, 1,399. On the morning of the 17th four regiments of the brigade moved to Hardeeville on the Union Causeway, two regiments, the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Infantry and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, remaining to guard the division supply train from the Savannah River to this latter place. These two regiments joined the brigade on the following day, the 18th. The brigade was encamped on the south side of the town of Hardeeville, where drills, guard mountings, and dress parades were resumed and the camp put into as tolerable condition as the nature of the ground and weather would admit, until the morning of the 29th, when, at 7 o'clock, it broke camp and marched north and easterly toward Robertsville. S. C., to a point seven miles south of the latter place. January 30, marched to Robertsville and encamped on the south side of that town. January 31, the brigade moved about one mile and a half from the camp of the day before on the Sister's Ferry road, relieving the First Brigade, First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, Colonel Selfridge commanding, and holding that road.
        February 1, the brigade remaining at this last point, the Seventy-third Ohio Infantry and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Hurst commanding, were engaged in corduroying the Sister's Ferry road. February 2, marched northerly to near Lawtonville, guarding part of wagon train of division. At or near Lawtonville four regiments of the brigade were formed in two lines of battle on the left of the Second Brigade of this division, the remaining two regiments being sent as a support to the right of the line of the division. These lines were advanced about 200 yards to a swamp, and then withdrawn, and the brigade was placed in camp where it had first formed line. February 3, at 8.30 am., marched through Lawtonville with wagon train northerly to Beech Branch Post-Office. February 4, marched northeasterly through and beyond Smyrna. February 5, marched toward Buford's Bridge on the Salkehatchie. February 6, at 7.30 a.m., moved a short distance with the wagon train; then leaving the train, crossed the Salkehatchie, and moved northerly in the direction of Graham's Post-Office, on the South Carolina Railroad. February 7, at 7.30 a.m., moved to the South Carolina Railroad and encamped. February 8, moved to Graham's Station. Destroyed 1 ¼ miles of railroad track west and burnt 360 bales of cotton and the railroad buildings at this station, and went into camp at that place.

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        At 7.30 a.m., the 23d, moved three miles north of river on the Lancaster road and encamped for the day. At the river Lieutenant-Colonel Winkler, Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, hearing of two Union officers, escaped prisoners, who were secreted in this vicinity, was directed to send a company for them, and succeeded in bringing them safely to our army. February 24, marched all day guarding trains about one mile and a half; weather rainy; roads very bad. Three regiments of brigade, One hundred and thirty-sixth New York, Seventy-third Ohio, and Twentieth Connecticut Infantry, engaged nearly all day in corduroying the road. February 25, moved at 6.30 a.m. (raining), and then was ordered back to camp. Tents pitched, and at 9 a.m. moved out, and the brigade corduroyed the road from camp of previous night to Russell's Store, where the Lancaster and Camden road crosses, a distance of three miles and a quarter, and at night went into camp at the latter place. February 26, at 8 a.m., struck camp as ordered; moved out on Lancaster road; was ordered back; camp pitched again, and at 10.45 a.m. moved out again and marched to Hanging Rock and encamped. February 27, received marching orders, also orders countermanding the same, and remained all day in camp of night before, while the wagons were being crossed over Hanging Rock Creek. February 28, at 10 a.m., crossed Hanging Rock Creek and waited until 4 p.m. for the wagons to start; then moved with them half a mile, where they (the wagons) parked until 6.30 p.m., and then moved on with wagons until 12.30 o'clock, and bivouacked at a point two miles south of Little Lynch's Creek.

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        March 14, the brigade was ordered to make a reconnaissance on the Raleigh road to Taylor's Hole Creek, and on the Goldsborough or Tarborough road to the South or Black River. At 9 a.m. the brigade moved out in light marching order, leaving its camps behind and reaching the advance camps of Fifty-fifth Ohio and Thirty-third Massachusetts, was joined by them, and also the One hundred and second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, First Brigade of this division, Major Clay commanding, moved to the Goldsborough or Tarborough road. The Fifty-fifth and Seventy-third Ohio, and Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Hurst, Seventy-third Ohio, were ordered to proceed on the latter road to Great Creek, and Colonel Hurst was directed to cross that creek if he could and there to await further orders, while the Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers, Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers, and One hundred and second Illinois Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Buckingham, Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers, were ordered to proceed to Taylor's Hole Creek, on the Raleigh road, if possible. I proceeded with this latter column about four miles, and the enemy was met first at Evon's Creek. In a few moments, however, and after slight dispositions on our part, he left. The creek was crossed, and everything progressing favorably for some two miles beyond. I directed Colonel Buckingham to keep moving on carefully and to gain Taylor's Hole Creek if he could do so with his skirmish line, but not to engage his line of battle. (For a fuller and more particular report of this most satisfactory reconnaissance on the part of Colonel Buckingham I refer you to his inclosed report.) Then taking a by-road through woods I joined the column with Colonel Hurst at Great Creek. No opposition as yet had been met. Leaving four companies of the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, Major Lackner commanding, to hold a main road on my left, I took the nearest road to Black or South River, and proceeded three miles to within a few hundred rods of that river without opposition, here deploying five companies of the Fifty-fifth Ohio as skirmishers.

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        When I discovered that no further attempts to advance were about to be made I at once communicated the facts of my position to the general commanding division, who immediately directed me to return to a line less exposed, which was done in good order, taking up different lines in retiring until we reached the position from which we had at first advanced. Soon after, by direction of general commanding division, works were thrown up a short distance in advance of this, which three regiments of the brigade occupied and held that night, the One hundred and thirty-sixth New York Volunteers, Fifty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, and Twentieth Connecticut Volunteers. This is the report of the operations of the brigade in the protracted skirmish of March 16, lasting the larger part of the day.

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                                                                            W M. COGSWELL,
                                                                                    Brevet Brigadier-General, Commanding Brigade.

                                                                            Capt. JOHN SPEED,
                                                                                    Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps.