Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry Volunteers 
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

By THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: OFFICIAL RECORDS


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 12th Wisconsin Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 8 [S# 8]

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS. AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI, ARKANSAS. KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY FROM NOVEMBER 19, 1861, TO APRIL 10, 1862.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --10

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, March 14, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,

Comdg. Dept. of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo.:

GENERAL: I have the honor, in reply to your telegram, received late last evening, requesting to be furnished immediately with a correct statement of the number and position of troops in this department, to transmit herewith copy of General Orders, No. 26, of this department, reorganizing the Kansas troops, now in process of being carried out; and further to state that the only regiments in Kansas at present in effective condition for active service are the First and Eighth Kansas, the former at Fort Scott, the latter distributed through the disturbed counties of the State as provost guard. The Seventh Kansas (Jennison's), with a field piece and mountain howitzer, at Humboldt, 70 miles from Fort Scott; and the Ninth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth Wisconsin Regiments (infantry) and Second Ohio Cavalry and Rabb's Indiana Battery of six rifled pieces, all at Fort Scott or now moving south from there, under command of Col. George W. Deitzler, left by General Hunter in command of the department, to whom your communications announcing the position of General Curtis were duly forwarded by express immediately on their arrival.

Of the regiments at Fort Scott the following, from last report, is the effective strength for the field, there being much sickness now in this department: First Kansas Infantry, 600; Ninth Wisconsin Infantry, 750; Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, 750; Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, 800; Second Ohio Cavalry, 850 140 men having been detailed from this regiment to form a battery now being organized at this post under command of Lieut. George S. Hollister, Seventh U.S. Infantry, which battery is not completed yet, owing to the non-arrival of carriages, caissons, and equipments for the guns; and Rabb's Indiana Battery complete.

..... CHAS. G. HALPINE,
Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Forwarded to Secretary of War, March 18, 1862.)


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 8 [S# 8]

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS. AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI, ARKANSAS. KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY FROM NOVEMBER 19, 1861, TO APRIL 10, 1862.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --12

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, Kans., April 2, 1862.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Headquarters Department of the Mississippi, Saint Louis, Mo.:

SIR: I have the honor to report that I arrived at this post yesterday evening, and immediately assumed the command of the district.

I have been unable at present to obtain accurate statistics of the numbers and stations of the troops within this district, but as near as I can ascertain they consist of the following regiments: First Kansas (infantry), Colonel Deitzler, stationed at Lawrence; Second Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Mitchell, stationed at Shawneetown; Third Kansas (infantry), Colonel Cloud, stationed at Mound City or Fort Scott; Fourth Kansas (infantry), Colonel Cloud, stationed at Wyandotte. The Governor proposes to consolidate these two regiments, to be designated <ar8_654> as the Tenth Kansas, and desires them to be concentrated at Lawrence, for that purpose. Fifth Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Clayton, at Fort Scott; Sixth Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Judson, at Fort Scott; Seventh Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Jennison, at Lawrence; Eighth Kansas (infantry), Colonel Graham's, scattered, headquarters at Leavenworth City; Ninth Kansas (cavalry), Colonel Lynde (incomplete), at Iola, near Humboldt; Ninth Wisconsin (infantry), Colonel Salomon, at Fort Scott; Twelfth Wisconsin (infantry), Colonel Bryant, at Lawrence; Thirteenth Wisconsin (infantry), Colonel Maloney, at Lawrence; Second Ohio (cavalry), Colonel Doubleday, at Fort Scott; Rabb's Indiana battery, at Fort Scott; Hollister's battery, at Fort Leavenworth.

It has been recommended by Major Prince to detail the following regiments for the expedition to New Mexico: First Kansas, Twelfth and Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, Second and Seventh Kansas Cavalry, a battery from Saint Louis, and Hollister's battery. The latter battery is at present composed of men detailed from the Second Ohio Regiment, but this, unless that regiment accompanies the expedition, ought to be changed, and men detailed from some regiment of the same command for that purpose--say from Mitchell's.

... J. W. DENVER,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]

FEBRUARY 3-MARCH 6, 1864.--The Meridian Miss., Expedition and cooperating expeditions ...

No. 27. --Report of Brig. Gen. Marcellus M. Crocker, U. S. Army, commanding Fourth Division, of expedition to Meridian.

...

On the 4th of February, the Fourth Division had the advance, and at Champion's Hill encountered the enemy's cavalry. The Second Brigade, <ar57_238> commanded by Colonel Hall, having the advance of the division, one regiment of this brigade (the Fifteenth Illinois Volunteers, Col. George C. Rogers commanding) were deployed as skirmishers, and the rest of the brigade advanced in line of battle. They slowly drove the enemy during the day, making a march of about 10 miles. At 4 p.m. one regiment of General Gresham's brigade (the Twelfth Wisconsin, commanded by Lieut. Col. J. K. Proudfit) was sent to the support of the Second Brigade. The loss of this day's skirmish was as follows: Twelfth Wisconsin, 3 killed and 4 wounded.

...

M. M. CROCKER,
Brigadier-General, Commanding.
Lieut. Col. W. T. CLARE, Assistant Adjutant-General.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]
FEBRUARY 3-MARCH 6, 1864.--The Meridian Miss., Expedition and cooperating expeditions ...

No. 32. --Report of Cot. Cyrus Hall, Fourteenth Illinois Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of expedition to Meridian.

[ar57_245 con't]
HDQRS. 2D BRIG., 4TH DIV., SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Camp Hebron, Miss., March 9, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the recent expedition to Meridian and Enterprise:

My brigade, composed of the Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Seventy-sixth Illinois Infantry Regiments, left Camp Hebron on the morning of the 3d of February and marched to Black River, where a halt of two hours was made, after which I crossed the river and marched to Amsterdam, where my command encamped for the night. <ar57_246>

The next morning, February 4, my brigade was in advance of the Seventeenth Army Corps, a small detachment of cavalry' forming the advance guard, which, upon reaching the famous battle-ground of Champion s Hill, was suddenly assailed by a superior force of the enemy and somewhat rudely handled. General Crocker here ordered me to deploy my leading regiment (the Fifteenth Illinois Infantry) as skirmishers, and move carefully forward, and if possible develop the position and purpose of the enemy. After advancing thus for a short distance, my skirmishers became earnestly engaged with the enemy, who disputed every inch of ground with ability and determination. I then brought up the Fourteenth and Seventy-sixth Illinois Infantry Regiments and formed them on the right and left of the Clinton road, in easy supporting distance of the line of skirmishers. In this order I moved my command forward until we arrived at the forks of the road west of Baker's Creek, where the enemy opened upon us with two pieces of artillery, using shot and shell with great accuracy. The Twelfth Wisconsin (of the Third Brigade, Brig. Gen. W. Q. Gresham commanding) came forward to assist the Fifteenth Illinois Infantry, whose stock of ammunition was growing short, and in passing an open field in rear of the line of the skirmishers became exposed to the enemy's fire, one shot from the enemy's guns proving fatal to 3 men of the regiment. A solid shot passed through the ranks of the Fourteenth Illinois Infantry, fortunately doing no damage with the exception of wounding 1 man slightly. The line of skirmishers was pushed forward to Baker's Creek, closely followed up by my brigade in line of battle. Here we encamped for the night, having driven the enemy for a distance of 7 miles over a very rough and broken country, which afforded several very favorable positions for the enemy, from which it was very difficult to dislodge them. Notwithstanding the disadvantages under which we labored, such was the skill and adroitness of the officers and men of the Fifteenth Illinois Infantry that but 1 officer and 2 men were wounded during the day. From information obtained from prisoners and from unmistakable evidences left upon the field, the loss of the enemy was very severe.

...

CYRUS HALL,
Colonel, Commanding Brigade.
Capt. C. CADLE, Jr., Assistant Adjutant-General.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/3 [S# 74]
May 1-September 8, 1864.--THE ATLANTA (GEORGIA) CAMPAIGN

No. 463.--Report of Brig. Gen. William B. Hazen, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division, of operations August 18-September 8.

...

Early on the morning of the 31st Col. Theodore Jones, commanding First Brigade, on the left, was directed to seize and fortify a commanding eminence about half a mile to the front of his left. He had just gained it when the enemy came also to occupy it. He held his ground, however, with a portion of his command, while the remainder fortified the position. It was found to be of the greatest importance, as it overlooked the entire front occupied by the enemy. Columns of rebel troops were now seen to be extending to our left, planting artillery, and making all dispositions necessary to attack. As he extended beyond my left, and as my troops were formed in a light line, with considerable intervals, a brigade, from the Seventeenth Corps, under command of Col. George E. Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteers, and two regiments, under Col. William B. Woods, Seventy-sixth Ohio Volunteers, were sent to me, and posted where most needed, where they afterward performed good service. I now had sixteen regiments in the line and one in reserve. No point of it could be given up without endangering the entire line. At 2 p.m. the enemy commenced a vigorous fire of artillery all along his line, and was soon after seen advancing his infantry. We had good works, and the attack was met with the most perfect confidence. He came on in two full lines, supported by troops in mass, coming in one place quite inside the works, and persisted in the attack for about three-quarters of an hour, when he was completely repulsed at all points, and those who came too near captured. We lost quite heavily in the trenches before the fight took place, but during the fight we had but 11 killed, 52 wounded, and 2 missing. Of the enemy we buried over 200, captured 99 unhurt, and 79 wounded. We also took 2 stand of colors and over 1,000 stand small-arms. I have reason to believe that over 1,000 of the enemy were wounded. <ar74_184>

...

W. B. HAZEN,
Brigadier-General.
Lieut. Col. R. R. TOWNES, Assistant Adjutant-General, Fifteenth Army Corps.
 
 

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/3 [S# 74]
May 1-September 8, 1864.--THE ATLANTA (GEORGIA) CAMPAIGN

No. 572.--Reports of Maj. Gen. Frank P. Blair, jr., U.S. Army, commanding Seventeenth Army Corps.

...

From this time until the 26th of August the command was occupied in making approaches, digging rifle-pits, and erecting batteries, being subjected day and night to a galling fire of artillery and musketry. On the 26th of August the command moved at 8 p.m.; marched all night, reaching Dry Pond at daylight and Camp Creek by 10 a.m. of the 27th. At 7 a.m. on the 28th I moved to the West Point railroad at a point between Fairburn and Red Oak, where, under instructions, a slight line of rifle-pits was erected, and a large fatigue party set to work destroying the railroad, which was thoroughly accomplished for a distance of about two miles. No movement was made on the 29th; the men were kept busily engaged during the day completing the destruction of the railroad. On the 30th my command moved in rear of the Sixteenth Corps, on the road to Jonesborough. In consequence of the delay caused by trains in my front I was compelled to bivouac, having marched only about six miles in fifteen hours. My command moved at daylight on the morning of the 31st to Flint River, where they were placed in position on the north bank, refused on the left of the Fifteenth Corps. During the morning the enemy assaulted the position held by the Fifteenth Corps with great vigor. By direction of the major-general commanding, I sent one brigade of the Third Division, under command of Colonel Bryant, of the Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteers, as a re-enforcement to the Fifteenth Corps. For particulars of the part taken by this brigade in the engagement, I refer you to the official report of Colonel Bryant hereto attached. During the afternoon the remainder of the Third Division (General Woods) crossed the river and took a position on the left of the Fifteenth Corps.

...

FRANK P. BLAIR, JR.,
Major-General, Commanding.
Lieut. Col. WILLIAM T. CLARK, A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, Dept. and Army of the Tennessee.
O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/3 [S# 74]
May 1-September 8, 1864.--THE ATLANTA (GEORGIA) CAMPAIGN

No. 576.--Reports of Brig. Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division, of operations June 27 and July 21-22.

...

My losses were heavy and in some respects particularly unfortunate and embarrassing. At the very commencement of the action, even before a shot had been fired upon my lines, Col. R. K. Scott, commanding my Second Brigade, was captured by the enemy while returning to his command from a detached regiment, and during the first attack both Brigadier-General Force and his adjutant-gen-eral, Capt. J. B. Walker, fell severely wounded. These officers, occupying the positions they did, and having the entire confidence of their commands, could not be spared without great detriment to the division. This was especially the case with Brigadier-General Force, whose coolness, sagacity, and bravery had long since won the admiration of the whole division, and always inspired the men with confidence and enthusiasm. The batteries of artillery in my division, the Third Ohio, Battery D, First I1linois, and Battery H, First Michigan, did very effective service during all of these successive engagements, and their officers and men showed great skill and determined bravery. Capt. W. S. Williams, Third Ohio Battery, my chief of artillery, is entitled to great credit for the coolness and skill displayed in adjusting and using his batteries, and in saving them when exposed. Especial notice is also due to Col. George E. Bryant, of the Twelfth Wisconsin Veteran Volunteers, who assumed command of the First Brigade when General Force fell, and to Lieut. Col. G. F. Wiles, Seventy-eighth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, who took command of the Second Brigade. These officers, though taking command after the battle opened, displayed <ar74_566> great coolness and skill. Capt. G. D. Munson, my picket officer, was very efficient in the management of the skirmishers until driven in, and in acting as aide during the balance of the time. My aides, Lieut. G. W. Porter and Lieut. A. W. Stewart Capt. J. C. Douglass, assistant adjutant-general: Lieut. W. H. Hessin, acting assistant adjutant-general, and Maj. J. T. Rainey, acting assistant inspector-general, all displayed great coolness and bravery in collecting information and delivering orders, and Lieut. V. Warner, ordnance officer, for his skill in saving his train, and his promptness in supplying the command with ammunition. The character of the fight was such, our front changing so often and rapidly, that the position of a staff officer was much more than usually exposed, yet all were prompt and efficient. Lieutenant Hessin fell from his horse severely wounded during the latter part of the action.

...

M.D. LEGGETT,
Brigadier-General.
Lieut. Col. A. J. ALEXANDER, Assistant Adjutant-General, Seventeenth Army Corps. P. S.--I would further report that I captured over 800 stand of arms. M. D. LEGGETT,
Brigadier-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/3 [S# 74]
May 1-September 8, 1864.--THE ATLANTA (GEORGIA) CAMPAIGN

No. 577.--Report of Brig. Gen. Charles R. Woods, U.S. Army, commanding Third Division, of operations August 23-September 8.

... On the 31st moved up and took position in reserve in rear of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and put up a line of works west of Flint River. About 9 a.m. I was ordered to send one brigade to report to Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, commanding Fifteenth Army Corps. I sent the First Brigade, under command of Colonel Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteers. This brigade was posted on the left of the Fifteenth Army Corps, upon a refused line, where it threw up strong works and skirmished heavily with the enemy. About 2 p.m. the enemy made a determined <ar74_568> attack upon the front of the Fifteenth Army Corps, reaching around so as to engage two of the regiments in the First Brigade of this division. The enemy was handsomely repulsed at all points with great slaughter. Col. George E. Bryant claims as a fair proportion of the killed and wounded in his front and the interval between his brigade and the Fifteenth Army Corps 250; 12 prisoners were taken. As soon as the attack was made I was ordered across Flint River, with the remainder of the division, and took position on the left of the First Brigade, where works were put up to cover the men.

...

Especial mention is due to my brigade commanders--Col. George E. Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin, commanding First Brigade; Lieut. Col. G. F. Wiles, Seventy-eighth Ohio Veteran Volunteers, commanding Second Brigade, and Col. A. G. Malloy, Seventeenth Wisconsin Volunteers, commanding Third Brigade--for their untiring energy and the promptness with which all orders were executed.

...

CHAS. R. WOODS,
Brig. Gen., Comdg. Third Division, 17th Army Corps.
Lieut. Col. A. J. ALEXANDER, Assistant Adjutant-General, Seventeenth Army Corps. ...