Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry Volunteers
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies

By THE WAR OF THE REBELLION: OFFICIAL RECORDS


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 8 [S# 8]

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS. AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI, ARKANSAS. KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY FROM NOVEMBER 19, 1861, TO APRIL 10, 1862.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --8

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 100.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 15, 1862.

Col. Charles Doubleday, commanding Second Ohio Cavalry, is hereby appointed acting brigadier-general, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

His brigade will consist of the Second Ohio Cavalry, Twelfth Wisconsin Regiment <ar8_558> of Volunteers, Ninth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers, and such other troops as may hereafter be assigned to him.

The commanding officers of the Ninth and Twelfth Wisconsin Regiments will report to Actg. Brig. Gen. Charles Doubleday by letter.

By order of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME 8 [S# 8]

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS. AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN MISSOURI, ARKANSAS. KANSAS, AND THE INDIAN TERRITORY FROM NOVEMBER 19, 1861, TO APRIL 10, 1862.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. --8

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 100.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS,

Fort Leavenworth, Kans., February 15, 1862.

Col. Charles Doubleday, commanding Second Ohio Cavalry, is hereby appointed acting brigadier-general, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

His brigade will consist of the Second Ohio Cavalry, Twelfth Wisconsin Regiment <ar8_558> of Volunteers, Ninth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteers, and such other troops as may hereafter be assigned to him.

The commanding officers of the Ninth and Twelfth Wisconsin Regiments will report to Actg. Brig. Gen. Charles Doubleday by letter.

By order of Major-General Hunter:

CHAS. G. HALPINE,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XVII/2 [S# 25]

CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN WEST TENNESSEE AND NORTHERN MISSISSIPPI FROM JUNE 10, 1862, TO JANUARY 20, 1863.(*)

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#11

BOLIVAR, [TENN., October 8, 1862].

Major-General GRANT:

Order for Ross' movement received. Two companies Illinois cavalry, one regiment, and one section will move, flying light, to seize and hold Davis' Mill Bridge; the rest of the column will follow rapidly. I think Mack's regiment (Seventy-sixth Illinois) had better remain here, and perhaps the Twelfth Wisconsin. Mack has no haversacks for provisions.

S. A. HURLBUT.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/1 [S# 36]

APRIL 18-24, 1863.--Expedition from Memphis, Tenn., to the Coldwater, Miss. ...

No. l.--Reports of Maj. Gen. Stephen A. Hurlbut, U.S. Army, commanding Sixteenth Army Corps.(*)

[ar36_554 con't]

HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tenn., April 21, 1863.

SIR: I send you last dispatch from Corinth, also written reports from Colonel Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin, as to movement on Coldwater.

The river at Coldwater Station proved impassable. Our troops fell back to Hernando. I have just had verbal report from Bryant. Major Hayes, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, has died of his wound. His conduct was most gallant. With 40 men he captured 65 prisoners. We have 80 in all. Fearing that Chalmers might be re-enforced from Greenwood, I have sent this morning the Fourteenth and Forty-sixth Illinois and one battery, with orders, if they hear Smith's guns, to force a passage, by bridging or otherwise, and join him.

I have just received a dispatch from La Grange that a woman just in from Holly Springs reports heavy cannonading south of Holly Springs on yesterday. If this is so, Smith has run across some other band or force, for Chalmers has not moved yet, I think, from Coldwater.

Smith has 1,500 good infantry and a good battery, and although I am somewhat anxious about his not appearing in their rear at or about Senatobia before our men left Coldwater on Monday noon, I think he is strong enough to work his way back or forward against anything but a movement in force from below, of which I have no intelligence.

Dodge is, I am satisfied, careful as well as brave, and will hold the line of Bear Creek as long as necessary.

Your obedient servant,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-General

Lieut. Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[lnclosure. ]

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION,

Near Memphis, April 21, 1863---1 a.m.

[General STEPHEN A. HURLBUT :]

GENERAL: Inclosed (+) I send you dispatches just received from Colonel Bryant. You will notice that he had quite an animated time of it, finding the rebels in force intrenched on the Coldwater, which he could not cross for reasons stated. Major Hayes severely, supposed mortally, wounded; two officers of the Thirty-third Wisconsin dead. Our force <ar36_555> fell back on the Horn Lake road, about 18 miles from Memphis, where they are now encamped. They are encumbered with 57 privates and 7 commissioned officers taken prisoners. If they remain or return, they will want assistance from here in the shape of ambulances and artillery horses, besides a sufficient force of cavalry to relieve Major Hayes' command, which is played out.

What has become of General Smith?

Awaiting your orders, I am, general, your obedient servant,

J. G. LAUMAN,

Brigadier-General

-----

HEADQUARTERS SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tenn., April 25, 1863.

The expedition against Chalmers suffered the misfortune of most combined movements. General Smith did not get into the rear in time, and from high water in Coldwater River, and the slowness and extreme caution of Colonel Bryant, of the Twelfth Wisconsin, who led the force from here, that part of the expedition did not force the passage of the river. As Smith came up on Wednesday. Chalmers broke into small squads and ran off to Panola, burning all bridges.

I have had nothing from Dodge for three days, but his base is firm at Eastport, on the line of Bear Creek.

I sent you copy of letter from Grierson, near Pontotoc. I have not heard from his main column since.

The Second Iowa Cavalry has burned Okolona, destroyed the road and barracks; also large amounts of provisions, &c., at Tupelo, either by themselves, or by the enemy, in fear of them. This is reported by two of that regiment, who were cut off and came into Corinth. The country cavalry is hanging around them, but I think they will work their way in.

There is nothing else here of news. As soon as I get news from any of these expeditions, I will forward it.

Your obedient servant,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Major-general,.

Lieut. Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/1 [S# 36]

APRIL 18-24, 1863.--Expedition from Memphis, Tenn., to the Coldwater, Miss. ...

No. 3.--Reports of Col. George E. Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry.

<ar36_556>

JOHNSON'S FARM, EIGHTEEN MILES FROM MEMPHIS,

April 20, 1863.

CAPTAIN: We commenced skirmishing with the enemy on Saturday, 2 miles across Nonconnah, and pushed him to Hernando. He had a camp 18 miles out of Memphis. They removed their tents through Hernando on Saturday morning. After we got into camp at Hernando, at sundown, 600 rebels attacked us. We went out, met, and routed them, and captured 63 privates and 7 commissioned officers; killed and wounded about 20 of them. I sent out the ambulance to pick up their wounded, and they fired on the flag. The next morning we reached Coldwater River at 8 a, m., skirmishing with the enemy 8 miles up the river. We fought them from 8 a.m. till 4 p.m., but were unable to cross the ferry, the boats of which the rebels shot loose.

Their force was infantry, Chalmers having been re-enforced by two regiments on Thursday.

Major Hayes was badly, and I fear mortally, wounded about 9 a.m. He was so weak he could tell me nothing. I posted the artillery to the front, with the Forty-first and Thirty-third and three companies of the Twelfth Wisconsin, leaving the balance of the Twelfth to hold the hill. The enemy was fully equal to us, intrenched. I sent cavalry up the river above the railroad, but they could find no place to cross. At 4 p.m. they commenced shelling us from the hill beyond, though, of course, they did not have our range. After throwing a few shells, they apparently withdrew. At this time the cavalry on my right commenced to skirmish, and sent me word they had met the enemy's advance. Previous to this I had been told they were crossing below. I immediately took the battery train and seven companies of the Twelfth Wisconsin on the hill in rear, and soon moved the whole force back, and filed to the right of the Horn Lake road. Here I met Major Eastman. On this road I camped, and this morning moved into Hernando. I sent cavalry back to the river, and they found the enemy still there. I also sent cavalry toward the east. Though meeting and driving the enemy, they found no place to cross, and could hear nothing of Smith's guns; 500 or 600 rebels have been continually in our rear; attacked and captured a pressed ambulance, with Lieutenant Major, which I recaptured. On consultation with the commanding officers, it was decided to fall back here and communicate with you. We have 2 officers of the Thirty-third Wisconsin dead, Major Hayes badly wounded, and some 13 others dead and wounded. The rebels have torn up the bridges behind us, on Hernando road, compelling us to come this way. Several of the battery homes are dead, and they are down to four to a gun, and they played out. I wish I could hear by daylight. I dislike to come back; still, with the prisoners, rations running out, and ammunition getting a little scarce, I ask for instructions. If we go back, we shall want ambulances, ammunition, and bread. What has become of Smith? Men never fought better. I do hope I may hear by daylight. It is best to send not less than 50 men with this.

GEORGE E. BRYANT,

Colonel.

Capt. W. H. F. RANDALL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

<ar36_557>

HDQRS. TWELFTH WISCONSIN VOLUNTEER INFANTRY,

Memphis, Tenn., April 25, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that, on the morning of the 18th instant, in pursuance to orders from General Lauman, I moved from Memphis, on the Hernando road, with the Twelfth and Thirty-third Wisconsin, Forty-first Illinois Volunteers, and the Fifteenth Ohio Battery. At the Nonconnah, Major Hayes, with 265 men, of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry, reported to me. Two miles south of Nonconnah he met a picket of 10 men of the enemy, and captured 5 of them. Seven miles north of Hernando, the camp of Colonel [W. C.] Falkner was broken up. A large amount of corn, an ambulance wagon and 4 horses and harness, loaded with ham, were captured here, belonging to the C. S. Army.

The column reached Hernando, Miss., 25 miles south of Memphis, at 6 p.m. [G. L.] Blythe, with 300 men, hovered on my rear and flanks all day, twice firing on the flankers thrown out from the column. At 6.30 p.m. the pickets on the south of the town were attacked by Colonel [W. C.] Falkner, with from 600 to 700 men on foot. I immediately sent Major Hayes, with cavalry, to meet them, and got my forces in position for battle. After a sharp engagement of thirty minutes, and killing and wounding 30 of the enemy, the enemy fell back, leaving in our hands 72 prisoners, including 7 commissioned officers. Among the badly wounded were two commissioned officers. I immediately sent the surgeons of the command with their ambulances and infirmary corps to look after the enemy's dead and wounded, but they were fired upon, and returned with only 4 of the wounded. In this skirmish we had 2 men slightly wounded. It was too dark, and the men and horses too much used up, to pursue. We captured seventy stand of arms and accouterments.

The command was under arms at 3 a.m. Sunday morning, and at sunrise started for the Coldwater. Met the enemy's pickets 2 miles south of Hernando. The column moved swiftly on. When 4 miles out, our rear was attacked by Blythe. I sent Companies B and K, of the Twelfth Wisconsin, with 18 cavalrymen, to repel them, and they soon scattered them. About the same time I received a message from Major Hayes that he had reached Perry's Ferry and driven the enemy across; that he was badly wounded, and the men getting out of ammunition. I immediately put the battery (Fifteenth Ohio, Captain Spear), the two leading regiments, the Thirty-third Wisconsin, Colonel Moore, and the Forty-first Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Nale, upon a very swift double-quick, which, through mud ankle-deep, they kept up for 4 miles. Lieutenant.Colonel Poole, with the Twelfth Wisconsin, in rear of the train with prisoners, was instructed to move steadily on, with flunkers thrown out on either side, and bring forward all the men who might fall out from fatigue, that might be caused by our rapid advance. Arriving at the river, found the cavalry dismounted and holding the ferry. Captain Spear immediately got two pieces in position, and shelled the thicket on the other side. Our cavalry fell back to their ammunition wagon, under orders to be ready to cross. Falkner's men retired from our range; the firing ceased, and Lieutenant Picquet, of the Thirty-second Illinois Volunteers, provost-marshal, was just trying to get across the river to the boat tied on the other side, when the rebels returned, re-en-forced by two regiments of mounted infantry, dismounted (First Missouri, and Colonel [R.] McCulloch's Arkansas [Missouri] regiment).

In the mean time the Thirty-third Wisconsin Volunteers had formed in the swamp on the right of the road, and the Forty-first Illinois, with Companies C, H, and E, of the Twelfth Wisconsin, on the left of the <ar36_558> road, close by the river bank. The enemy advanced nearly to the brink of the river, where, under cover of felled trees and a gully, they poured in a perfect shower of balls. The brave Captain Spear, as they advanced down the road within 40 yards, commanded, "Cannoneers to your guns; canister? The men worked with a will, and it was only when he found that their sharpshooters, under cover of large cypress logs, were picking off his men and horses, that he fel1 back. On our side was a thick, wooded swamp, which, from the last night's rain, was full of water. The two regiments and three companies on either side remained in their positions from 9 a.m. till 5 p.m., lying flat on the ground, and keeping their sharpshooters, five companies from a regiment, close to the bank, under cover of trees. A continuous fire was kept up from both sides all day. Seven companies of the Twelfth Wisconsin guarded the prisoners and the hill, in our rear. I posted the cavalry up and down the river, to find another crossing. I sent cavalry up the river at 3 p.m., who crossed the railroad at the burned bridge, but could hear nothing of General Smith.

At 4 p.m. the enemy were again re-enforced, and commenced shelling us from the hill opposite, to which we replied with our artillery, but we could get no range on them. The ground was so watery that we could only get position for one gun. At 4.30 p.m. I moved the artillery train and the Twelfth Wisconsin to a strong position on the hill.

At 5 p.m. my cavalry sent word they had met the enemy's pickets on our right. I immediately fell back 2 miles, and moved about 3 miles to the west on the Horn Lake road, to prevent their flanking me. I am now satisfied that there was nothing there except Blythe's command. Here Major Eastman, with 100 men of the Second Wisconsin Cavalry, reported to me. Here we encamped for the night. During the night there was sharp picket firing, and we were in line of battle. One man of the Thirty-third Wisconsin was wounded.

The next morning, Monday, I moved up to Hernando, and sent my cavalry forward again to Perry's Ferry, where they found the enemy still in position, with their pickets (which they drove in) thrown out toward Hernando. I also sent the cavalry east toward Holly Springs, to the river, with instructions to listen for Smith's guns. At 3 o'clock I fell back to Johnson's farm, on the Horn Lake road, and sent 30 cavalry to Memphis with dispatches for you.

At 8 o'clock Tuesday morning I fell back 6 miles to the junction of the Hernando and Horn Lake roads. I here received notice of re-enforcements, and sent the ambulances with dead and wounded to meet those you had sent out. While this was being done, the enemy sent in a flag of truce, which did not detain us, as we were stopped for dinner. I marched till dark, when we encamped.

The next morning, Wednesday, we moved through Hernando, and crossed my cavalry at both the Holly Springs road and Perry's Ferry. I was convinced that General Smith could not be below, from the fact that General Chalmers spent Monday night 2 miles south of Hernando, and was all day Tuesday with his wife at Hernando.

Thursday I returned to Horn Lake Creek, and Friday to camp at Memphis. The expedition captured 80 prisoners, 200 horses and mules (100 of them good cavalry horses), 70 stand of arms, 12,000 pounds of bacon, 10,000 pounds of which were destroyed; also a quantity of dry-goods, medicine, &c.

The Forty-first IIlinois lost I man killed and 1 Founded. The Thirty-third Wisconsin lost 2 commissioned officers killed and 3 men wounded. The Twelfth Wisconsin had 2 men wounded and 1 missing. The Fifteenth <ar36_559> Ohio Battery lost 1 man killed and 2 wounded. The Fifth Ohio Cavalry lost Major Hayes, killed, and Lieutenant [Robert] Major and 3 men, wounded.

The conduct of all, both officers and men, was excellent. I know of no one who failed to do his whole duty. Under a very hot fire of sharpshooters, who aimed principally at officers and mounted men, during the fight of Sunday, the different corps were put in position with the steadiness and good order of veterans. The Fifteenth Ohio Battery, Capt. Edward Spear, was splendidly handled, under a withering fire, at not over 50yards. I cannot refrain from mentioning a gallant act of Private Clayton W. Gonsanley. Private John Maddox was struck down in the act of ramming a shell home. Gonsanley, who was sponging, immediately and without orders sprang across the gun, seized the rammer, sent home the shell, and continued so to work until ordered away, only stopping long enough to move Maddox from under the wheels of the gun Captain Spear showed daring, skill, and ability, and was well seconded by Lieutenant Burdick and all the men.

The cavalry did fine service, being constantly on the move, and especially in the skirmishes at Hernando on Saturday evening and Sunday morning at Perry's Ferry, under the gallant lead of Major Hayes, of the Fifth Ohio. This fine officer was struck through the pelvis and thigh by a Minie ball at about 8.30 a.m. on April 19, at the ferry, and died in an ambulance on Tuesday, April 21, at about noon. All was done for him that was possible; but the wound was of such a nature that anything but smoothing his passage to the grave was useless. He is entitled to all the praise that an able, dashing, and brave officer can receive from his companions. His loss was a severe one to the service. All the officers and soldiers of the cavalry did their duty bravely and promptly. In the infantry steadiness and coolness, hard and veteran-like, were the characteristics. Two officers of the Thirty-third Wisconsin, Capt. Joseph F. Lindsley, Company H, and Lieut. Henry S. Swift, commanding Company E, were killed at the ferry while at their posts of duty. Their fellows bear testimony to the fact that they were two of the best officers in the regiment. To praise the living, as they deserve, by special notice, would be to name and praise the whole.

I am under many obligations to Lieutenant Picquet, of the Thirty-second Illinois Volunteers; Lieutenant Duncan, of the Fifty-third Indiana, and Lieutenant Harris, of the Twenty-eighth Illinois Regiment, Colonel Johnson's aides, who accompanied me; also to my acting adjutant, Lieut. J. K. Proudfit, and Lieutenant [William J.] Norton, of the Twelfth Wisconsin. They repeatedly made themselves the marks of the enemy's sharpshooters in carrying orders to the command in the swamp. I also thank Colonel Dornblaser and his command, Lieutenant-Colonel Heath, Major Eastman, and Major Wilson, with their commands, who re-enforced my command. They did everything in their power to ease the labors of my tired and foot-sore soldiers, and ably and cheerfully carried out all orders and commands after they joined us.

The expedition is in camp. With the exception of I man missing and those struck by bullets, it is as intact as when put under my care. In killed and wounded I know the enemy has suffered more than we have, and the captures, at least, are clear profit.

Your obedient servant,

GEORGE E. BRYAN'T,

Colonel Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. W. H. F. RANDALL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/2 [S# 37]

JULY 5-25, 1863.--The Jackson, Miss., Campaign.

No. 32.--Report of Col. George E. Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, commanding Fifth Brigade.

<ar37_607>

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH BRIGADE, TWELFTH DIVISION,

Near Jackson, Miss., July 20, 1863.

SIR: This command left camp, near Vicksburg, as the Third Brigade, Fourth Division, Sixteenth Army Corps, attached to the Thirteenth Army Corps, the division being commanded by Brig. Gen. J. G. Lauman, at 7 a.m. July 5, 1863.

The command of the brigade was passed over to me on the morning of the march, on account of sickness of Colonel Johnson, former commander.

Lieut. Thomas A. Halston, acting assistant adjutant-general, was taken sick at camp near Big Black River, and returned to Vicksburg.

I detailed Lieut. James K. Proudfit, adjutant of the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, in his place, who has acted in that capacity since.

During the march to this point the division was at the rear of the corps, and the troops were largely employed in guarding trains. The regiments composing this command were separated a good deal of the time, but no incidents worthy of mention occurred until after the arrival near this point.

In the morning of the 11th instant, the Fifty-third Indiana Infantry, Col. W. Q. Gresham commanding, under orders from General Lauman, reconnoitered and opened a road from the Clinton road to the Raymond and Gallatin roads, and returned to the brigade, near the Clinton road, about 10 a.m., having successfully carried out its instructions. Soon after (about 11 a.m.), the Twenty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Maj. H. Rhodes commanding, under orders from General Lauman, marched upon the road opened by Colonel Gresham's command, and took position on the left of the Southern Railroad, a short distance to the front and right of the junction of the Raymond and Gallatin roads. The balance of the brigade marched about 2 p.m., by order of General Lauman, upon the same route, the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, Capt. Giles Stevens commanding, guarding division train. The brigade halted that night near the present division hospital. The train did not come up, and the Twelfth Wisconsin remained with it. The Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, Col. John Logan commanding, was placed upon picket, by order of General Lauman, from the Raymond to the Gallatin roads in rear of the position. The Fifty-third Indiana Infantry and Fifteenth Ohio Battery remained where the command halted.

In the morning of the 12th instant, General Lauman, with the First Brigade, made an advance upon the enemy's works, taking with him the Twenty-eighth Illinois Infantry, which was in position as indicated above. After the advance was commenced, an officer of General Lauman's staff sent forward the Fifty-third Indiana Infantry and Fifteenth Ohio Battery, as I suppose, to support the movement, though I am informed that their only orders were to follow the First Brigade.

The troops advancing on the enemy's works on the right of the railroad soon came under a terrible fire of shell, grape, canister, and musketry. The advance was over nearly level ground, covered with logs, slashed brush, stumps, &c., and perfectly open to the enemy's fire for about 600 yards. Brave as men can be, the troops rushed on till some arrived within 75 yards of the rebel works, or less, but they were finally forced to relinquish the hopeless effort, and slowly fell back to <ar37_608> a ridge on the right of the railroad nearly opposite the position occupied by the Twenty-eighth Illinois Infantry the night before.

At this point, by order of General Lauman, 1 brought up the Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, having relieved it on picket by five companies of the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, and took command of the brigade, all of which was present, except the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry.

During the day, General Lauman, by order of Major-General Ord, commanding the Thirteenth Army Corps, turned over the command of the division to Brig. Gen. A. P. Hovey, who issued orders, upon assuming command, merging the division in the Twelfth Division of the Thirteenth Army Corps, and naming this command as the Fifth Brigade.

In the afternoon of the same day, the command took position, by order of General Hovey, in the forks of the Raymond and Gallatin roads, and on the 16th instant took position, by order of General Hovey, in rear of Fourth Brigade.

Since the affair of the 12th instant, a part of the command has been daily engaged in destroying railroad track south, and the remainder performing ordinary duties of troops in camp.

The command is in excellent condition, as brave and every way efficient as any troops in the army.

The Twenty-eighth Illinois Infantry, under the gallant Major Rhodes, true to its ancient record, behaved splendidly on the 12th instant, leaving some of their dead almost in the rebel ditch. This praise applies to officers and men alike, without exception, as I believe. It lost 5 officers and 63 men out of less than 200 engaged. This bloody fact tells its own story of their conduct.

The Fifty-third Indiana Infantry gallantly drove off from the field and saved two guns of the Fifth Ohio Battery, whose men and horses were nearly all disabled. Fortunately, the Fifty-third Indiana, though much exposed, lost no men. No other troops of the command have been under fire since leaving Vicksburg.

The command consists of the Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, Capt. Giles Stevens commanding; Twenty-eighth Illinois Infantry, Maj. Hinman Rhodes commanding; Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, Col. John Logan commanding; Fifty-third Indiana Infantry, Col. Walter Q. Gresham commanding, and Fifteenth Ohio Battery, Capt. Edward Spear, jr., commanding.

I am, captain, very truly, your obedient servant,

GEORGE E. BRYANT,

Colonel Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, Commanding Brigade.

Capt. JOHN E. PHILLIPS,

Assistant Adjutant-General


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]

Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#8

SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 72.

HDQRS. SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Memphis, Tenn., April 16, 1863.

I. Brigadier-General Lauman, commanding Fourth Division, will dispatch the Twelfth and Thirty-third Wisconsin, on Saturday morning at daylight, to march upon Chalmers' position at Coldwater Station. He will also detach one good battery as a part of the expedition. Two battalions of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry, in command of Major Hayes, will accompany the movement, the whole to be under command of Colonel Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin. The troops will take with them four days' rations and full 40 rounds of ammunition, to be carefully inspected as to condition and quantity. The march will be commenced on the Her-nando road, without any beat of drum and as quietly as possible. The ambulances will accompany the regiment, and two wagons per regiment will be allowed for transportation. For the line of march and object to be accomplished, written instructions will be forwarded.

* * * * * * * * * *

By order of Maj. Gen. S. A. Hurlbut:

HENRY BINMORE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]

Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#9

MEMPHIS, TENN., April 17, 1863.

Col. G. E. BRYANT, Twelfth Wisconsin Vols., Comdg. Third Brig.:

COLONEL: In accordance with instructions from Major-General Hurlbut, the expedition designated in Special Orders, No. 72, from these headquarters, will start at daybreak on Saturday morning. Major Hayes, of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry, will report at the Nonconnah Crossing, which, I think, will have to be made at Hollow Ford. The cavalry will be ordered to keep well in advance, from time to time communicating with you. One section of artillery should move light (without caissons), after the infantry advanced guard, the rest of the battery between the two <ar38_204> regiments. Strong advance guards will be kept a quarter of a mile to the front of the column, and in wooded places, and where side roads come in or any chance of cover for ambush, flankers will be thrown out to the distance of 150 yards. The column will be kept closed up, and no straggling allowed.

The expedition will move steadily on, and as rapidly as consistent with order, not fatiguing the men, through the most direct route, upon Coldwater Station and Senatobia, and attack at once any force that may be found. General Smith's expedition, 1,500 strong, leaves La Grange on Friday, to get in their rear. If you hear their guns, or they hear yours, you will push for a junction. Should Chalmers hold his ground, observe the position of his battery, and push skirmishers, under any cover, with special orders to kill the horses. If the battery is crippled in horses, it is sure to be taken. In camping, every precaution must be taken against a night attack, and the entire command must be under arms at 3 a.m.

If Chalmers abandons the Coldwater line, follow him steadily toward Panola, and push the cavalry out to communicate with Smith's force between Panola and Senatobia. They are ordered to turn toward this force on their return. If any force should have been sent up from below to Chalmers, which I do not expect, the two expeditions united are more than a match for them.

I wish you to inform your officers and men, upon the assurance of Major-General Hurlbut, that one regiment of good infantry is competent to meet all the cavalry north of Vicksburg.

You will strictly forbid plundering of houses, stores, churches, or other buildings. You will cause forage to be taken; horses, wherever found in Mississippi, and transportation, if needed. All arms capable of service will be taken, but no violence to peaceable people.

The object of the expedition should be accomplished in two days.

On the return, the usual precautions will be taken; strong rear guards maintained, and a detachment of cavalry kept well to the rear.

I expect this movement to be executed with good discipline. I shall hold the officers rigidly accountable for their men.

J. G. LAUMAN.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXIV/3 [S# 38]

Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Mississippi And West Tennessee (And Those In Arkansas And Louisiana Connected With The Siege Of Vicksburg) From January 20 To August 10, 1863.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#9

MEMPHIS, TENN., April 21, 1863.

Lieut. Col. JOHN A. RAWLINS, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Milliken's Bend, La.:

SIR: I send your last dispatch from Corinth; also written report from Colonel Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin, as to movement on Coldwater.

The river at Coldwater Station proved impassable. Our troops fell back to Hernando. I have just heard verbal report from Bryant. Major Hayes, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, has died of his wound. His conduct was most gallant. With 40 men he captured 65 prisoners. We have 20 in all. Fearing that Chalmers might be re-enforced from Greenwood, I have sent this morning the Fourteenth and Forty-sixth Illinois and one battery, with orders if they hear Smith's guns to force a passage, by bridging or otherwise, and join him.

I have just received a dispatch from La Grange that a woman just in from Holly Springs reports heavy cannonading south of Holly Springs on Saturday. If this is so, Smith has run across some other band or force, for Chalmers has not moved yet, I think, from Coldwater.

Smith has 1,500 good infantry and a good battery, and although I am somewhat anxious about his not appearing in their rear at or about Senatobia before our men left Coldwater, on Monday noon, I think he is strong enough to work his way back or forward against anything but a movement in force from below, of which I have no intelligence.

Dodge is, I am satisfied, careful as well as brave, and will hold the line of Bear Creek as long as necessary.

Your obedient servant,

S. A. HURLBUT.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]

FEBRUARY 3-MARCH 6, 1864.--The Meridian Miss., Expedition and cooperating expeditions ...

No. 33. --Report of Brig. Gen. Walter Q. Gresham, U. S. Army, commanding Third Brigade, of expedition to Meridian.

[ar57_247 con't]

HDQRS. THIRD BRIG., FOURTH DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS,

Hebron, Miss., March 5, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command on the recent expedition through Mississippi:

On the 4th ultimo, being the second day out, the Second Brigade, Colonel Hall, encountered the enemy's cavalry on the eastern slope of Champion's Hill, and advanced skirmishing to within 1 miles of Baker's Creek, when I received orders from General Crocker to send a regiment to the front and relieve the Fifteenth Illinois.

The Twelfth Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Proudfit commanding, was ordered up and moved forward promptly and cheerfully and relieved the Fifteenth Illinois and drove the enemy up to and across Baker's Creek, with a loss of 3 men killed and 3 wounded. <ar57_248>

In this charge the Twelfth Wisconsin captured 1 lieutenant and men. The enemy left on the field 4 men killed and 1 major mortally wounded. At the same time and place the Fifty-Third Indiana had 2 men wounded. Near Decatur the Twelfth Wisconsin had 1 man killed and 2 wounded while on duty with a forage party, and near the same place 4 men straggled from the Fifty-third Indiana and were captured. No casualties in either of the other regiments.

On the 16th ultimo, in pursuance to orders from Brigadier-Gen-eral Crocker, with my own brigade, the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry and one section of Spear's battery, I proceeded from Enterprise to Quit-man and destroyed a large railroad bridge over the Chickasawha, 2 miles south of the town. The bridge was covered and 210 feet long. Immediately north of the bridge I effectually destroyed 600 yards of trestle, from 10 to 30 feet high. We also destroyed the railroad depot at Quitman, the large and elegant hospital buildings, recently erected, one large steam flouring-mill, and one large steam saw-mill. The railroad bridge was guarded by the Ninth Alabama, but on our approach they abandoned their stockades and fled in the direction of Mobile.

Having accomplished the object of our expedition to Quitman, I moved my command back to the head of Alligator Swamp and bivouacked for the night, having marched from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 27 miles and worked four hours.

On the morning of the 17th, we destroyed the trestle-work over Alligator Swamp, 1 miles in length, and from 9 to 30 feet high. We also destroyed 2 miles of railroad north of the swamp, burning the ties and heating and bending every rail.

During the expedition my brigade marched 375 miles, destroyed 4 miles of the Mobile and Ohio Railroad, 2 miles of which were bridges and trestle. Although the march was fatiguing, both officers and men bore it with cheerfulness and without a murmur.(*)

I am, captain, very respectfully, &c.,

W. Q. GRESHAM,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Brigade.

Capt. C. CADLE, Jr.,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/3 [S# 74]

May 1-September 8, 1864.--THE ATLANTA (GEORGIA) CAMPAIGN

No. 578.--Reports of Col. George E. Bryant, Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry, commanding First Brigade.

[ar74_569 con't]

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., THIRD DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report the following as the part taken by the First Brigade, Third Division, Seventeenth Army Corps, in the battle before Atlanta July 28:

The brigade at 12 m. on that day was formed in two lines, facing westward, and was engaged in throwing up breast-works, when the sound of heavy musketry on my right, in front of Fifteenth Corps, caused me to form in line my two reserve regiments, the Twelfth Wisconsin (Lieutenant-Colonel Proud fit commanding) and the Thirty-first Illinois (Lieutenant-Colonel Pearson commanding) Veteran Regiments of Infantry. Soon after forming them, I received orders from Major-General Howard to send my reserve regiments to the support of the Fifteenth Corps. They were immediately started on double-quick, the Twelfth Wisconsin in advance, and proceeded more than a mile to the right of the Fifteenth Corps. The Twelfth Wisconsin formed on the extreme right of the army, in a ravine, and charged up a hill, from which our men had just been dislodged, thereby nearly turning our right flank, routing the enemy therefrom, capturing and killing some hundred of the foe. This position they held during the day and night following, during which time several charges were made by the enemy, but in each case easily repulsed. The regiment was protected by the slight rail breast-works built by our men, and by the enemy during the short time they held the hill and improved by themselves after they retook the hill. The regiment lost but 2 men killed and 17 wounded. The Thirty-first Illinois, on its arrival at the Fifteenth Corps, was held in reserve for the same <ar74_570> time and suffered no loss. The balance of the brigade, in common with the troops of the division, was exposed to an enfilading fire from the enemy's artillery, but lost but 1 man killed and 1 man wounded. The conduct of Lieutenant-Colonel Proud fit and his regiment in promptly and quickly moving to the place of need, was highly commended by many officers who witnessed their acts. It was without doubt one of the important movements that saved our flank and gained us the victory.

And the following as the part taken by the brigade before Jones-borough, August 31:

At 11 a.m. on that day I was ordered by Brigadier-General Woods to report with three regiments, the Twelfth and Sixteenth Wisconsin and the Thirty-first Illinois, to Maj. Gen. John A. Logan. This was done in fifteen minutes, and by his directions I was conducted by a staff officer to Brigadier-General Hazen, and under his direction formed the brigade as follows: The Thirty-first Illinois covered a gap fronting an orchard toward Jonesborough, the Twelfth and Sixteenth Wisconsin were moved to the left, with an interval of some two regiments between them, and Thirty-first Illinois refusing their line to protect the flank. Works were hastily thrown up, the Twelfth and Sixteenth Wisconsin being compelled to build traverses and wings to protect themselves from shell and bullets of the enemy. The charge of the enemy extended along the front of the Thirty-first Illinois, and seven companies of Twelfth Wisconsin, which was successfully resisted at both points. Owing to the nature of the ground and the formation of our works, other regiments had flank fires over our front.

I claim for the brigade as its just proportion of killed, wounded, and prisoners of the enemy on that day, 262.

The Thirty-first Illinois Regiment, with 200 men, expended in one hour 19,000 rounds of ammunition.

In this engagement the Twelfth Wisconsin had 6 men wounded, and the Thirty-first Illinois, 1 man.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. BRYANT,

Colonel, Commanding.

Capt. J. C. DOUGLASS,

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Division, 17th Army Corps.

-----

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., THIRD DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following in brief of the part taken by the First Brigade, Third Division: Seventeenth Army Corps, consisting of the Twentieth, Thirtieth, Thirty-first, and Forty-fifth Illinois and Sixteenth Wisconsin Regiments, from May 1, 1864, to July 22, 1864, under command of Brigadier-General Force, and of the same brigade, under my own command (except the addition of Twelfth Wisconsin Regiment July 12, 1864, and deduction of Twentieth Illinois Regiment transferred out of the brigade July 22, 1864), from July 21, 1864, to date:

The whole command was transported from Cairo, Ill., to Clifton, Tenn., on transports, and marched, via Huntsville and Decatur, Ala., and Rome, Ga., to Acworth, Ga., where it arrived on June 8. The Forty-fifth Illinois Regiment was detached from the brigade at Etowah, Ga., <ar74_571> June 7, 1864, for guard duty, and have not since joined the command. On June 10 marched to Big Shanty, Ga., and on the morning of 11th of June advanced in line of battle to near Kenesaw Mountain and intrenched. The brigade participated in the charge June 15, also in the charge on Brush Mountain 19th of June, and in all subsequent movements of the division to 27th of June. On that day it was severely engaged in the charge on the enemy's works, suffering considerable loss, and driving the enemy's skirmish line from a hill near his main works and holding the position, under heavy fire, until ordered to return to its intrenchments near dark.

On July 2 brigade was ordered to march, and on July 4 met the enemy's skirmishers on the right of Sixteenth Corps, driving them two miles, taking and holding an important position on the right of said corps. Subsequently its lines were extended for ten miles on the right of the army along the north bank of the Chattahoochee, reaching to Sweet Water Creek, guarding the ferries and picketing the entire front. In this position the Twelfth Wisconsin joined the brigade July 12.

Previous to joining the brigade the Twelfth Wisconsin Regiment had moved with the balance of the Seventeenth Army Corps from Cairo, Ill., to Big Shanty, Ga., being attached to First Brigade, Fourth Division. On 11th of June the regiment advanced in line of battle and intrenched. On 13th of June it reconnoitered a position in front of our picket-line to ascertain the enemy's strength. They charged the enemy's skirmish line, driving them from and advancing beyond their works, but were subsequently met by a force much superior to their own and withdrew, with a loss of 25 killed, wounded, and missing. On July 5, when the Fourth Division was advancing near the right of the army, this regiment charged aline of the enemy's skirmishers in rifle-pits, driving them' therefrom, and advancing to the bank of the Nickajack Creek. On 12th of July this regiment was assigned to Third Division, and on 13th of July to First Brigade, under command of Brigadier-General Force. On the 16th of July the brigade marched from its position on the right of the army, via Marietta, Ga., and Roswell, passing through Decatur, Ga., July 20, and bivouacking four miles from that place, our line of battle, facing west, at foot of hill occupied by the enemy.

At 7 a.m. on the 21st the brigade was ordered to charge and hold the hill in its front. The Twelfth and Sixteenth Wisconsin Regiments formed the advance of the charging column, supported by the Twentieth, Thirtieth, and Thirty-first Illinois Regiments. The charge was made under very heavy musketry, the enemy being protected by intrenchments on the crest of the hill. The works were taken at the point of the bayonet and held, with aggregate loss to the First Brigade of (except Twentieth Illinois Regiment) about 258 killed, wounded, and missing. The steady and unwavering advance of the columns under the terrible fire from the enemy's line (Cleburne's famous division), advantageously posted behind intrenchments, was such as to merit for both officers and men the highest record for courage and skill. In this charge the Twelfth Wisconsin Regiment lost out of less than 600 men engaged 134 men killed and wounded. It captured more small-arms than it had men engaged, many of the arms still loaded and capped. It had 5 color bearers shot and 2 flag-staffs shot off. Other regiments of the brigade behaved with equal gallantry, but suffered less loss. <ar74_572> Early in the great battle of the 22d of July the brigade became engaged, and continued fighting until the next morning, repulsing many charges, literally piling the enemy's dead in heaps in front of the works, fighting the enemy all night with but the Breast-works between them and the foe. Early in the action Brigadier-General Force was severely wounded, and the undersigned assumed command. During the fight the brigade changed front many times, fighting from both sides of same breast-works, and at times it was obliged to refuse its flanks to meet the desperate and furious onsets of the enemy, so that it had to fight at same time on two fronts and one flank. But it held the hill so dearly gained the day before, and the key to the position of the Army of the Tennessee, with a loss (excepting Twentieth Illinois Regiment), aggregate, of 329 killed, wounded, and missing.

During all these two days' desperate fighting the organization and order was excellent and the men in the best of spirits. They fought to whip, and when the enemy at one point of the line had reached the outside of the breast-works, fixed bayonets and swore that they would stay or die.

From the time the command joined the grand army at Acworth, June 8, until the close of the campaign it was constantly at the front, under fire, marching, digging, and fighting. It has not failed to take and hold any position it was ordered to, nor has any part of the command moved except in pursuance of orders from proper authority. The officers and men believe they can't be whipped, and have always had perfect confidence in their officers and their final success.

Of the part taken by the brigade in the battles of July 28 and August 31, see my report of yesterday.(*)

The aggregate loss to the brigade in killed, wounded, and missing since June 8, 1864, is 863.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. E. BRYANT,

Colonel, Commanding.

Capt. J. C. DOUGLASS,

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Third Division, 17th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/3 [S# 74]

May 1-September 8, 1864.--THE ATLANTA (GEORGIA) CAMPAIGN

No. 585.--Report of Col. William L. Sanderson, Twenty-third Indiana Infantry, commanding First Brigade, of operations June 27.

[ar74_586 con't]

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG.. FOURTH DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS,

Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., July 28, 1864.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with orders I respectfully submit the following report of the operations of this brigade yesterday:

In obedience to orders I moved at 8 a.m. on the enemy's lines with four companies each of the Fifty-third Indiana and Twenty-third Indiana and Twelfth Wisconsin, and two companies of the Thirty-second Illinois Infantry in advance, under command of Major Ferguson, Twenty-third Indiana, and Major Vestal, Fifty-third Indiana, <ar74_587> the companies of the Fifty-third Indiana (A, D, I, and B) occupying the right of the line and connecting with the line of the Sixteenth Army Corps. The enemy's skirmishers were soon encountered and driven back to their rifle-pits, where three regiments of the rebels were held in reserve and so completely concealed by bushes and undergrowth as to be unperceived by our men. The enemy evidently expected to capture the entire line, as they did not fire until our men reached in some instances the parapet of their works, when they opened a murderous fire of musketry, compelling our men to fall back with a loss of 65 killed, wounded, and missing.

The body of Lieutenant White, Company I, Fifty-third Indiana, and several other killed and wounded men, fell into the hands of the enemy, as their skirmishers were immediately advanced to the position from which we had driven them at the commencement of the engagement.

The reconnaissance developed the fact that on the mountain in our immediate front the enemy had several lines of strong works defended by a very heavy force.

I cannot conclude this report without specially mentioning the conduct of Major Ferguson, of the Twenty-third Indiana, and Maj. W. L. Vestal, of the Fifty-third Indiana. The orders given them were promptly and faithfully obeyed, and their gallantry and coolness throughout merits the highest praise and approbation.

To Lieut. L. C. Malbon, Twenty-third Indiana, brigade picket officer, is due great credit and commendation for his energy and bravery. He was constantly on the field, and where his duty called him he was always to be found.

My thanks are also due to my staff--Capt. J. M. Price, Twelfth Wisconsin; Capt. Smith Townshend, Thirty-second Illinois, and Lieut. H. Duncan, acting assistant adjutant-general--for their promptness and faithfulness in executing all the orders intrusted to them, and last, though not least, to the men. Never did men fight better. Although greatly outnumbered, the advantages of ground and position against them, they stood nobly until forced to retire; their conduct can be excelled by none; I was proud of them.

Inclosed find a list(*) of killed and wounded, which I regret to say includes the names of some good and efficient officers.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. L. SANDERSON,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Capt. C. CADLE,

Asst. Adjt. Gen., Fourth Division, 17th Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/4 [S# 75]

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN, FROM MAY 1, 1864, TO JUNE 30, 1864.(*)--#19

GENERAL ORDERS No. 9.

HDQRS. DEPT. AND ARMY OF THE TENN.,

Big Shanty, Ga., June 11, 1864.

The following officers are announced as members of the staff corps of this department and army. They will be obeyed and respected accordingly:

Capt. George C. Norton, Twelfth Wisconsin Infantry Volunteers, acting assistant inspector-general.

Capt. Daniel W. Whittle, Seventy-second Illinois Infantry Volunteers, assistant provost-marshal-general.

Capt. O. H. Howard, U. S. Army, chief signal officer.

Capt. J. T. Conklin, assistant quartermaster, assistant chief quartermaster.

By order of Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson:

WM. T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/2 [S# 99]

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA (FROM FEBRUARY 1), SOUTH CAROLINA, SOUTHERN GEORGIA, AND EAST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1865, TO MARCH 23, 1865.(*)--#13

HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Millersville Post-Office, S.C., February 6, 1865.

Capt. C. CADLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: Being instructed by General Howard, as I was about moving the division over, to reconnoiter well to the front on the Midway road and prevent the burning of any more bridges, I at once sent out the Twelfth Wisconsin (Colonel Proudfit) and Captain Munson, of my staff. They reached Lemon's Swamp, about five miles out, after dark. The four small bridges were already in flames, and the road through the swamp obstructed by felled trees. An observing force of the enemy appear to be posted beyond the swamp. The road between this and the swamp requires corduroying in several places. The Twelfth Wisconsin is returning to camp. It is said that there is a work on this side of the Edisto defending the railroad bridge. No other works on the railroad between the Edisto and Midway. General Hardee was in Augusta last Thursday.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. F. FORCE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.