119th New York Infantry Volunteers 
Partial Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


Many lengthy OR documents contain a very small portion of the 119th New York Infantry. Instead of ignoring these documents, that portion of this regiment was taken out and placed in an abridged version.

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 252.--Report of Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz,
U.S. Army, commanding Third Division, with correspondence, &c.

...

        Immediately east of Talley's farm, where General Devens had his headquarters, General McLean's left connected with my right, consisting of the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania and the Sixty-first Ohio, of General Schimmelfennig's brigade, deployed in line of battle on the road, having an embankment in their front and the thickest kind of pine undergrowth immediately in their rear; on their left the Sixty-eighth New York, of the same brigade, also in line of battle; the sharpshooters of the brigade in the little piece of woods between the two roads east of the open field flanking the line; the Eighty-second Illinois and the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York behind General Schimmelfennig's left, in second line, connecting with General Schimmelfennig's left; the One hundred and nineteenth New York, of my Second Brigade, occupying the southern border of the little piece of woods above mentioned; then Dilger's battery; the Fifty-eighth New York in the church grove; behind the interval the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania, and farther to the left the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, in second line, and the Eighty-second Ohio still farther back, as above stated.
        On the left of Captain Dilger's battery commenced Colonel Buschbeck's brigade, part of which was deployed in the rifle-pits; Captain Wied-rich's battery, from which two pieces had been detached to General Barlow's brigade, stood near Colonel Buschbeck's right on high ground. On the left of Colonel Buschbeck, General Barlow's brigade, with one section of Captain Wiedrich's battery. Farther to the left, troops of other corps. A rifle-pit was constructed, running north and south, on the west of the eminence east of Dowdall's Tavern. The Reserve Artillery, which arrived in the course of the day, was placed on that eminence.

...

        It was nearly 6 o'clock when we suddenly heard a sharp artillery and musketry fire on our extreme right. I at once ordered all regiments within my reach to change front. The One hundred and nineteenth New York I took out of its position in the woods, facing south, and formed it near the junction of the Plank road and the old turnpike, facing west. The Sixty-eighth New York received the order to occupy the western edge of the same piece of woods, the southern border of which had been occupied by the One hundred and nineteenth. On the right of the One hundred and nineteenth formed the One hundred and fifty seventh New York, then the Eighty-second Illinois, and farther to the right the Eighty-second Ohio, the latter receiving from me the order to cover the left of the Fifty-eighth New York, to fire one volley if the enemy should break through the woods in front, and then to make a bayonet charge. The Fifty-eighth New York and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, on the extreme right, remained as they were, under the immediate command of Colonel Krzyzanowski. Captain Dilger, commanding my battery, drew his pieces back to the high ground, near Wiedrich’s battery, and opened upon the columns of the enemy as soon as they showed themselves on the old turnpike.

...

        As the enemy emerged from the woods, the regiments of my second line stopped him with a well-directed and rapid fire. Colonel Peissner, of the One hundred and nineteenth New York, a gentleman of the highest order of character and ability, and an officer of great merit, was one of the first to fall, pierced by two bullets.

...

        Meanwhile the enemy, after having forced back the One hundred and nineteenth New York by his enfilading fire, gained rapidly on the left of Captain Dilger's battery. This battery and that of Captain Wiedrich remained in position until the very last moment. Captain Dilger limbered up only when the enemy's infantry was already between his pieces. His horse was shot under him, as well as the two wheel horses and one lead horse of one of his guns. After an ineffectual effort to drag this piece along with the dead horses still hanging in the harness, he had to abandon it to the enemy. The conduct of this brilliant officer was, on this as on all former occasions, exemplary.
        The enemy was now pouring in great force upon our right and left, and the position in and near the church grove could no longer be held. The two regiments still remaining there gave several discharges, and then fell back in good order. Arriving near the north and south rifle-pit, General Schimmelfennig ordered the Eighty-second Illinois to charge <ar39_657> into the projecting corner of the woods on the right, the border of which was already in possession of the enemy. The One hundred and fifty-seventh was directed to fall back along the Plank road, so as to clear the front of the rifle-pit, which seemed to be well filled with men, and to take position on the border of the woods behind. The Twenty-sixth Wisconsin had, in the meantime, been very severely pressed on the extreme right, and there the regiment lost somewhat its compactness, the woods being very thick and the wing companies becoming detached. It was at that moment when I rejoined you behind the rifle pit, which was manned in the center by some of Colonel Buschbeck's regiments; on the left by several companies of the Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania, Sixty-first Ohio, and One hundred and nineteenth New York, and on the extreme right by the Eighty-second Ohio. Several pieces of the Reserve Artillery were still firing.

...

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Major-General, Comdg. Third Division, Eleventh Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. O. O. HOWARD,
                                                                    Commanding Eleventh Army Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 256.--Report of Col. Wladimir Krzyzanowski,
Fifty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding Second Brigade.

...

        About 11 p.m. I received orders to detail one regiment of my brigade for picket duty, to relieve the Eighty-second Illinois Volunteers, for which duty I ordered the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, with the exception of about 60 men, which were in excess of the number required for picket duty. Of these, 45 men were detailed to form part of the skirmishing line. To replace the regiment thus detailed, I ordered the Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, which still occupied the place assigned to it the day before. The disposition of my troops before the engagement was, consequently, as follows (see annexed sketch):(*) The Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers on picket, except 60 men; One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers on the left wing of the First Brigade, Third Division, deployed in line along the Orange Court-House Plank road, fronting south, and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin and Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers in the position above indicated, fronting west. I remained with my staff with the two last-named regiments. About 400 paces in front of the latter two regiments, the skirmish line of 80 men of the Twenty- sixth Wisconsin Volunteers and 45 men from the Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers; the Twenty-sixth regiment Wisconsin Volunteers in close column to the center on the extreme right, and the Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers on the left, with deploying distance between them.

...

        Of the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers I cannot mention much, from the fact that this regiment was detached from the rest of the brigade. I have ascertained that it fought well.

...

        Of Col. E. Peissner, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, I can speak only with admiration, he having cheered his men at the moment he fell, as I am told by many of his officers.

...

                                                            W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Col., Comdg. 2d Brig., 3d Div., 11th Army Corps.

                                                            Maj. Gen. CARL SCHURZ,
                                                                    Commanding Third Division.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 253. -- Reports of Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz,
U. S. Army, commanding Third Division.

...

        At 8 a.m. Colonel Krzyzanowski, with the One hundred and nineteenth New York and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, made a reconnaissance toward the ridge opposite our right; and took 47 additional prisoners. He was called back without having found the enemy. On the 5th, we marched to Emmitsburg.
        A report exhibiting the heavy losses my division suffered in the <ar43_732> three days' battle has already been submitted to you. (*) It bears ample testimony that my men in that battle fought with bravery, and never yielded without necessity.
        I am, general, most respectfully, yours,

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Major-General, Commanding Third Division.

                                                            Major-General HOWARD,
                                                                    Commanding Eleventh Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 262. -- Report of Maj. August Ledig,
Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry.

...

        July 1.--At 5 a.m. we left camp, and proceeded to Gettysburg. We arrived there at 1.30 a.m. We were immediately ordered to the north side of the town, where the regiment was placed as follows: On my left (the extreme left of the Second Brigade), the Eighty-second Ohio Volunteers; on my right, the One hundred and nineteenth New York Regiment, in line of battle. Here we received a heavy fire from the enemy's 10-pounder rifled guns, which caused a loss in the regiment of 1 killed and 2 wounded. About 2 o'clock, the whole brigade advanced nearly one-half mile, which was greatly interrupted by fences, which had to be taken down under a heavy fire of musketry from the enemy. When within 100 yards of them, in a wheat-field, we charged upon them and drove them back. We halted, and opened fire on the enemy. The Eighty-second Ohio, on my left, was flanked, and gave way. Col. F. Mahler's horse was shot, but he [The colonel] got up again, and went forward to direct the fire to the left flank, which was now unprotected, and the enemy threatening to cut off our retreat. He was already within 40 yards of our left and rear.

...

        I began now to retreat about 200 yards into an orchard. The One hundred and nineteenth New York Regiment, on my right, suffered also heavily from the flank attack, and moved backward also in the garden. I received orders to fall back on the town. Here the Second Division arrived and went into the engagement. Shortly after this, a new line behind the town was ordered, and formed by my regiment in the best of order. I was ordered in a corn-field behind a stone wall, below the Evergreen Cemetery, the Eighty-second Ohio on my right, the First Brigade on my left.

...

                                                            AUGUST LEDIG,
                                                                    Major, Commanding Regiment.

                                                            Col. W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Commanding Second Brigade.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVII/2 [S# 71]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING SPECIALLY TO OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, AND PENNSYLVANIA, JULY 1 TO AUGUST 3, 1864.(*)--#15

...

        At 5 p.m. July 13 five companies, fully armed, equipped, provided with forty rounds of ammunition per man, and furnished with five days' rations, were forwarded to go by rail to Washington, as follows, under command of Capt. Aug. Volkhausen, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers: Third Company, Sergt. P. Savage, One hundred and sixty-fourth New York Volunteers; Fourth Company, Sergt. G. F. McGee, I, Second Michigan Volunteers; Sixth Company, Sergt. Maj. C. E. Berry, Fourteenth U.S. Infantry; Seventeenth Company, Sergt. W. H. Forsyth, Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Twentieth Company, Sergt. T. W. Hyde, Eighty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. At 7.30 p.m. July 13 Lieut. G. G. Leavenworth, Fourteenth New York Heavy Artillery, was sent with a company (Eighteenth) of 110 men belonging to that arm of the service, fully armed, equipped, and rationed. At 4.30 p.m. July 14 three companies of 100 men each, fully armed, equipped, and rationed, and 204 unarmed cavalrymen, under command of Captain Wood, One hundred and twenty-fourth New York Volunteers, were sent to take cars at Broad and Prime streets depot, as follows: Twenty-first Company, Sergt. James B. Oliver, Ninety-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers; Twenty-second Company Sergt. Martin Ryan, One hundred and twenty-second New York Volunteers; Twenty-third Company, Sergt. C. W. Miller, One hundred and forty-first <ar71_361> Pennsylvania Volunteers; Nineteenth Company (unarmed cavalry), Lieutenant Ingersoll, First Michigan Cavalry. At 6 p.m. July 14 200 men, not capable of bearing arms, but fit to perform many other duties in trenches, were sent under command of Lieut. John Banets, Sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers. A number of men were returned to hospitals, being unfit to send. A report of these will be made as soon as lists can be prepared.
        I am, captain, your obedient servant,

                                                            H. A. FRINK,
                                                                    Colonel and Provost-Marshal.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 204.--Reports of Brig. Gen. John W. Geary, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division.

...

        The One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers and Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, of my Second Brigade, were both absent, the former as guard to the wagon train, the latter having been on picket duty. With the rest of my command I crossed the creek in front of Babb's house at 3 p.m., and advanced the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, deployed as skirmishers, up the mountain, followed by Buschbeck's brigade on the right and Candy's on the left, each disposed in two lines of battle. Knapsacks had been unslung and piled before commencing the ascent. Half way up the firing became lively. The enemy had posted skirmishers thickly across the steep face of the ridge, behind rocks, logs, and trees, and their fire was galling and destructive. Our skirmish lines, advancing rapidly, though they had to fairly clamber up the rough ascent, drove those opposed to them back with loss, and reached the foot of the palisades. Mean time my main lines pressed steadily forward under a severe musketry fire from the top of the palisades until the advanced regiments were halted to rest and form on the ground held by our skirmishers. The general line of advance had inclined at an angle toward the Dalton road and my extreme left was now across it. The atmosphere was hot and stifling, and the ascent was one of the greatest difficulty.

...

        The officers and men temporarily assigned to his command entered heartily into the performance of the duty allotted them while death threatened on every side. The position taken and held, and the duty performed, including the capture of a strongly intrenched and well-defended battery, were such as required no <ar73_121> ordinary amount of skill and heroism. Colonel Lockman and Lieutenant-Colonels Randall, Kilpatrick, Lloyd, and Fourat, with the troops under their command, rendered good service in their execution of all orders, the execution of which was intrusted to Colonel Cobham. Colonels Candy and Ireland, and Captain Wheeler, my chief of artillery, performed their important shares in the work bravely, skillfully, and efficiently. Lieut. Col. E. F. Lloyd, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, fell mortally wounded at the head of his regiment while charging the enemy's battery. In the same charge, Capt. Charles Woeltge, One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, lost his life, being shot while his hand was on the cannon.

...

        May 20, 21, and 22, remained in camp, inspected my command, and prepared in every way for the further prosecution of the campaign. On the 20th received orders to be in readiness to march on the 23d, with twenty days' rations, and to send all sick and wounded to the rear. May 23, the term of service of the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers (Col. A. Buschbeck) having expired, it returned home. By the departure of Colonel Buschbeck. Col. J. T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, being senior officer present, was placed in command of the Second Brigade; marched at 6 a.m., following Butterfield, and crossed the Etowah on pontoon bridge near Milam's Bridge, encamping on high ground one and a half miles south of the river, Williams on my right and Butterfield on my left. May 24, under orders from General Hooker to push the enemy across Raccoon Creek toward Allatoona, I broke camp at daylight and pushed rapidly to the creek, resting a line of skirmishers on it to hold the Alabama road. In this position, covering the movement of Williams and Butterfield toward Burnt Hickory, I remained until noon, when I was relieved by the Twenty-third Corps.

...

                                                            THOS. H. ELLIOTT,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 223.--Reports of Lieut. Col. Enos Fourat,
Thirty-third New Jersey Infantry, of operations May 9-July 22.

...

        On the 13th we moved forward a short distance, and finally encamped for the night behind breast-works. On the 14th we started about 10 p.m. and moved on till about 3 a.m. on the 15th; then halted and rested until daylight. About 12.30 o'clock of this day we were drawn up in line of battle, the One hundred and nineteenth New York and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York being in line on our front. The enemy opened on us with grape, and the order was given to move forward. We did so, and soon came within range of their infantry fire. Halting for a time by order of brigade commander, the line was reformed, and Colonel Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York, being placed in command of that portion of the brigade on the advance, we were ordered to charge forward and take the works and battery in our front at all hazards. The men rose and rushed on with yells and cheers to the very summit of the hill, under a scorching fire from the enemy, and drove them from their guns to the works in the rear.

...

                                                            ENOS FOURAT,
                                                                    Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 143.--Reports of Lieut. Col. Frederick H. Harris,
Thirteenth New Jersey Infantry, of operations January 14-March 24 and April 10-May 24.

...

        January 14, 1865, in obedience to Special Orders, No. 4, reported with regiment to Brigadier-General Easton, chief quartermaster, Military Division of the Mississippi. Were ordered by him to report to Colonel Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, commanding provisional brigade, for duty at grand depot, Savannah. The regiment moved from camp, ïutside of the city, to Warren Square, Savannah. January 16, were relieved from duty in provisional brigade per General Orders, No. 9, with instructions to report to former command; received orders from brigade headquarters to move at 7 a.m. 17th instant, and joined brigade as it marched through the city.

...


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LI/1 [S# 107]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Maryland,
Eastern North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia (Except Southwestern),
And West Virginia, From January 1, 1861, To June 30, 1865.--#21

...

        Before General Heintzelman was put in command on the other side it became necessary, in consequence of confusion in orders and troops, as well as in regard to digging and chopping, to limit General Abercrombie's responsibility to Forts Marcy and Ethan Allen and their approaches. This I forgot to tell you until the order about Heintzelman was published, which would have effected the same thing. General Banks wants to give General Abercrombie another regiment as soon as he can. The One hundred and nineteenth New York and Eleventh Vermont have gone to Haskin to-day and are posted near Forts Lincoln and Bunker Hill. The Fifth Maryland arrived after I reported Weber's brigade, and was by order of General Halleck directed to proceed to headquarters without delay and report to General McClellan. I will find out in the morning whether it has gone. A telegram just received from General Porter says that a scouting party passed through Fairfax Court. House, Vienna, Freedom Hill, and Union Church, but found no enemy. They were going on to find out about a picket which they heard of near Hunter's Mills and Dranesville. Your telegram of 10 p.m. about Hooker's order just received.

                                                            RICHD. B. IRWIN,
                                                                    Captain, Aide-de-Camp, and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.