119th New York Infantry Volunteers 
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXI [S# 31]
Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Northern Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, And Pennsylvania From November 15, 1862, To January 26, 1863.
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.--#8
SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 4.

                                                            HDQRS. GRAND RESERVE DIVISION,
                                                            Stafford Court-House, January 14, 1863.

        The following-named officers of the staff of the Eleventh Corps will report to Brigadier-General Stahel, commanding Eleventh Corps, for orders: Maj. F. Kappner, aide-de-camp and chief engineer; Maj. H. Baldwin, jr., One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, assistant inspector of infantry; Capt. L. Schirmer, Second New York Battery, chief of artillery and ordnance. Capt. F. C. Winkler, judge-advocate; Capt. F. Dessauer, acting aide-de-camp, and Capt. C. R. Bowe, postal director.
        In parting with these officers, I desire to tender them my sincere thanks for the fidelity with which they have always executed the duties assigned them.

                                                            [F. SIGEL,]

Major-general: Commanding.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXV/1 [S# 39]
APRIL 27-MAY 6, 1863.--The Chancellorsville Campaign.
No. 257.--Report of Lieut. Col. John T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry.
[ar39_668 con't]

                                                            HEADQUARTERS 119TH NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
                                                            May 8, 1863.

COLONEL: In accordance with your order of this day, I beg leave to report as follows:

        At the time the enemy attacked our right, on the afternoon of the 2d instant, the One hundred and nineteenth New York was posted on the edge of the road leading toward Culpeper, facing to the front, and expecting an attack in that direction. When the firing commenced, Colonel Peissner, by order of General Schurz, moved the regiment up to the fork of the two main roads leading west, and posted it across both.
        Here we awaited the enemy, and engaged him until he made an attack on the left of our regiment, and also attacked with heavy masses our right flank. The position then became untenable, and we retired to the line of breastworks in our rear, where we reformed. We were forced also from this position by an enfilading fire from the right, and, endeavoring to retreat along the road toward Chancellorsville, were broken by the stream of straggling cavalry, artillery, and infantry. Part of the regiment took up several positions with the Twelfth Corps, and part united with McLean's division. The whole was reorganized on Sunday, whilst holding the position on the left of the line.
        Oar loss amounted in killed, wounded, and missing to 126, among whom were Colonel Peissner and 5 officers.

Most respectfully, &c.,

                                                            [JOHN T. LOCKMAN.]
 

                                                            Col. W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Comdg. 2d Brig., 3d Div., 11th Army Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 253. -- Reports of Maj. Gen. Carl Schurz,
U. S. Army, commanding Third Division.

                                                            HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION, ELEVENTH CORPS,
                                                            August 20, 1863.

GENERAL: On the part taken by my division in the actions of July 2 and 3, I have the honor to submit the following report:
        By the losses sustained in the battle of July 1, the Third Division was reduced to an effective force of about 1,500 men. A large number of officers were killed, wounded, or missing, many regiments being under the command of captains. General Schimmelfennig being still in his hiding place within the lines of the enemy, Colonel von Amsberg, of the Forty-fifth New York, commanded my First Brigade.
        The position of the Third Division was behind the stone walls inclosing the cemetery on the northwest side, an orchard separating it from the first houses of the town. I had five regiments deployed in the first line, five in column in the second, connecting on my left with the Second Division, and on my right with the First. My skirmishers were from 300 to 500 yards in front, and a detachment in a group of houses near the cemetery.
        The enemy made no attack in the forenoon of July 2. We observed his artillery moving on the ridges west, north, and east of Gettysburg, and taking position.
        About 4 p.m. the enemy opened upon us from his batteries, the artillery on Cemetery Hill replying with great spirit. The fire continued for about two hours. Although the cannonade was fearful and many projectiles fell into our battalions, not a man belonging to the Third Division, unless wounded, left the ranks. After the cessation of the cannonade, the enemy made a heavy attack upon the left wing of the army, which resulted in a complete repulse.
        Between 6 and 7 p.m. the enemy made a demonstration upon our right wing. As soon as the firing commenced, you ordered me to send one of my brigades to the support of General Ames, commanding the First Division. I took the First Brigade, Colonel von Amsberg <ar43_731> commanding, out of its position, filling its place behind the stone wall with the reserve regiments of the Second Brigade. One of the five regiments of the First Brigade (Seventy-fourth Pennsylvania) was left with General Ames to strengthen his right wing. The remaining four were directed toward a strip of woods on the right of the First Division, in which the firing had become very heavy, and where, according to the reports of some staff officers of the First Corps, immediate aid was needed. Two regiments (the One hundred and fifty-seventh New York and the Sixty-first Ohio) were guided by one of these officers, while two others (the Eighty-second Illinois and Forty-fifth New York) were led by the chief of my staff, Lieutenant-Colonel Otto, of the Fifty-eighth New York. It had meanwhile become quite dark, the direction of the fight being indicated by nothing but the sound of the musketry. The regiments entered the woods with the greatest determination, and drove the enemy from our rifle-pits, of which at several points he had already gained possession.
        It is my pleasant duty to mention as especially deserving, the names of Lieutenant-Colonel Otto, who superintended this operation with great judgment and courage, and of Lieutenant-Colonel Salomon, of the Eighty-second Illinois, who displayed the highest order of coolness and determination, under very trying circumstances.
        At 9 o'clock the enemy was repulsed at that point, and no further demonstration made. While this was going on, between 8 and 9 p.m., we suddenly heard a rapid musketry fire on the eminence immediately east of the cemetery, where Captain Wiedrich's battery stood. You ordered me to take two regiments across the road to the aid of that battery. This order was executed by two regiments of the Second Brigade, the One hundred and nineteenth and Fifty-eighth New York, headed by Colonel Krzyzanowski, commanding Second Brigade. I at once hastened with my whole staff toward the threatened point, driving back stragglers with our swords as we went. To my great surprise, we found a general melee in the battery itself, the enemy's infantry having already gotten possession of some of the guns. The cannoneers were defending themselves valiantly. Our infantry made a vigorous rush upon the intruders, and, after a short but very spirited hand-to-hand fight, succeeded in driving them down the hill.
        I cannot refrain from speaking of the conduct of the officers and men on that occasion with the greatest satisfaction.
        The regiments, thus scattered among other commands, were withdrawn during the night, and returned to their former positions.
        In the action of July 3, no part of my command but my skirmishers was engaged. During the memorable cannonade of the afternoon, my men behaved with the same firmness which they had exhibited on the preceding day.
        At daybreak on July 4, the Fifty-eighth New York, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Otto, entered the town of Gettysburg, the enemy having retreated, and took over 280 prisoners, among whom were several commissioned officers.
        At 8 a.m. Colonel Krzyzanowski, with the One hundred and nineteenth New York and the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin, made a reconnaissance toward the ridge opposite our right; and took 47 additional prisoners. He was called back without having found the enemy. On the 5th, we marched to Emmitsburg.
        A report exhibiting the heavy losses my division suffered in the <ar43_732> three days' battle has already been submitted to you. (*) It bears ample testimony that my men in that battle fought with bravery, and never yielded without necessity.
        I am, general, most respectfully, yours,

                                                            C. SCHURZ,
                                                                    Major-General, Commanding Third Division.

                                                            Major-General HOWARD,
                                                                    Commanding Eleventh Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXVII/1 [S# 43] -- Gettysburg Campaign
No. 260. -- Report of Maj. Benjamin A. Willis,
One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry
<ar43_742>

                                                            NEAR WARRENTON JUNCTION, VA.,
                                                            July 30, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit, pursuant to request, the following report of the part taken by the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers in the series of engagements fought at Gettysburg, on July 1, 2, and 3:
        It may be proper for me to state at the outset that I was not in command of the regiment during the battle, and consequently cannot recite accurately the orders received by my regimental commander.
        On July 1, about 5 a.m., we started on the road to Gettysburg; marched hastily over rough and muddy roads through a drenching rain, reaching there about 12 o'clock that day, a distance of 11 miles. At this time the First Corps had already been engaged for some time, and had commenced to retire. We continued the march through the town, and, according to your order, took position on the right of the road leading from Gettysburg to Chambersburg, in an orchard, where we for a short time halted, being subjected meanwhile to a severe cannonade of the enemy. Here one company (H) was ordered by you to deploy as skirmishers, which they did in handsome style, having instructions from you to prevent the enemy from advancing to a large barn and several adjacent buildings on our right. Your instructions were carried out to the letter.
        The First Division of our corps had already advanced against the enemy, when, showing signs of being overwhelmed, we with the rest of the brigade were ordered forward to their support, taking position on their left, and having on our left the First Brigade, of the Third Division Here we withstood an enemy more than threefold our number, receiving volleys of musketry in swift succession, and suffering severely from a destructive fire of shot and shell. Our regiment did not yield, but stood firmly until the First Division, Second Corps, had fallen far back toward the town, and the First Brigade, of our division, on our left, had disappeared from the field.
        At this juncture, with an enemy in front and on either flank, not only threatened with, but experiencing, a heavy enfilading fire, we retired in good order, and, I believe, were the last regiment to reach the foot of Washington street, where we again took a position to cover the town, and held the enemy in check until our tram' s of baggage-wagons and ambulances had withdrawn to the rear. This movement was a success, in part due to a section of Captain Dilger's renowned battery, planted upon an eminence near the square in the town of Gettysburg. You then ordered us to march to the opposite side of the town, which we accordingly did in most excellent order, taking a position along a stone wall by an orchard, on the edge of the town. In this position we remained until near nightfall, when we moved in a corn-field on the west side of the road from Emmitsburg to Gettysburg, between the cemetery and the town. Here we remained undisturbed during the night, sleeping on our arms; and here ends the first day's struggle.
        Next day, July 2, continuous skirmishing was going on in our immediate front, and sharpshooters of the enemy, who during the night <ar43_743> had couched themselves in houses and steeples of public buildings, harassed us constantly with their fire.
        About 4 p.m. opened what is said to be the grandest cannonade of the war, which lasted for about five hours, chiefly directed to the position held by your brigade and the residue of the corps. My regiment endured with a coolness and resolution most commendable.
        Late in the evening (about 9 p.m.) the enemy made a most desperate charge upon a battery supported by the First Division of our corps. They rushed forward with incredible fierceness, driving back the First Division in disorder, and actually reached the guns (one of which our men had already spiked) and demanded a surrender, but the commander of the battery and his brave cannoneers did not yield. Then you, seeing the critical position of affairs, and well knowing how soon the enemy would possess himself of the battery and the commanding heights if not forced back, called upon our regiment and the Fifty-eighth New York Volunteers, also of your brigade, to fall in and advance against them. It is needless for me to say, general, for you led us in person, with what alacrity the regiment responded, and with what determination it moved forward, and with what courage it met the foe, and, in conjunction with the gallant Fifty-eighth, drove him back, saved the position, and thus secured the whole army from irreparable disaster. Here ends the second day's struggle.
        During the night you ordered us to take position opposite the cemetery, in a field. Here the regiment remained during the whole of the day (July 3), maintaining its ground and receiving the attacks of the enemy with the greatest coolness and gallantry. As is well known, we were constantly perplexed as on the previous day, and that again from -- a.m. until -- p.m. the regiment was under the heaviest fire of the enemy's cannon, exhibiting the same coolness which had characterized it before. When night came, a heavy rain commenced, and firing ceased. We slept on our arms again, but had no encounter, it appearing that the enemy, defeated and disheartened, had fled away.
        The next morning (July 4) about 8 a.m. you ordered us, with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteers, on a reconnaissance, you commanding it in person. We advanced in an easterly direction toward York for the distance of about 2 miles, completely scouring the whole country, and taking many prisoners. You then, having accomplished your purpose, ordered us to return to the position we had left in the morning. This being done, we there remained until ordered forward with the rest of the corps in pursuit of the enemy toward Emmitsburg.
        Our regiment had suffered very heavily in the loss of officers and enlisted men. Colonel Lockman fell, wounded, while gallantly standing at his post. Adjutant Dodge, Captain Volkhausen, and Lieutenant Trumpelman were all seriously wounded while nobly struggling against the enemy, the two former (Adjutant Dodge and Captain Volkhausen) having had their legs amputated, and the latter (Lieutenant Trumpelman), I regret to say, has since died from the effect of his wound. Lieut. M. Rasemann and Lieutenant Frost were, I am sad to say, killed. Both died the death of heroes. Lieutenant A. B. von Cloedt is a prisoner in the hands of the enemy.
        Lieutenant-Colonel Lloyd, who assumed command of the regiment upon Colonel Lockman's receiving the wound, behaved with <ar43_744> the utmost coolness. Of the other officers and soldiers, I can speak only in terms of the highest praise.
        The loss of the regiment in killed, wounded, and missing amounts in the aggregate to the number of 144, including officers and privates.(*)
        All of which is respectfully submitted.

I am, general, respectfully, yours,

                                                            BENJAMIN A. WILLIS,
                                                                    Maj., Comdg. 119th Regt., New York Vols.

                                                            Col. W. KRZYZANOWSKI,
                                                                    Comdg. Second Brigade, Third Division, Eleventh Corps.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 219.--Reports of Col. Adolphus Buschbeck, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 4-22.
[ar73_202 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., SECOND DIV., 20TH CORPS,
                                                            Near Resaca, Ga., May 14, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that my command broke camp in Lookout Valley, May 4, and marched at about 4 p.m., <ar73_203> crossing Lookout Mountain, and bivouacked about one mile from Rossville. On the morning of May 5 marched at 8 a.m., passing through Rossville Gap, moving on the La Fayette road, and camped on Harrison's farm. May 6, marched at 5 a.m. and went into camp near Pea Vine Church. May 7, marched at 5 a.m., crossing Taylor's Ridge, passed through Gordon's Spring, and bivouacked in line of battle on the Rome road near Buzzard Roost. May 8, broke camp at about 11 a.m., and, pursuant to orders, moved in the direction of Mill Creek Gap, Ga., a pass in the Chattoogata Mountain. The Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers being on picket, received orders to follow the division. The brigade moved about a mile in column, the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers as advanced guard, when, coming to a fork in the road, the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers and Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers moved on the road to the left and the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, taking the road to the right, each column throwing out skirmishers well in advance, proceeded about three-quarters of a mile to a place where the roads formed a junction near the open ground, across which the road runs leading to the gap. At this point they were formed in line of battle in the following order: One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers on the right, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers on the left, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers on the right and left center, the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers deployed as skirmishers, covering the front of the brigade, the First Brigade following at supporting distance. The line then advanced in the direction of the gap (the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers moving on the roads à cheval) over very difficult ground, much obstructed by fences, a heavy underbrush, and the creek running at the base of the mountain. The ascent of the mountain was found very steep and arduous, requiring frequent halts to rest the men during the advance. The skirmish line of the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers was strengthened by detachments from each regiment. The skirmishers were engaged in a desultory fire soon after beginning the assault, the enemy retiring until the line had reached to within 300 or 400 yards of the palisades of rock which form the ridge. Here the fire became general, engaging the whole line, the troops steadily advancing until the nature of the ground affording superior facilities for the ascent upon the extreme of the line the regiments diverged slightly to the right and left. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers shortly after charged up the palisades and succeeded in planting their colors on the crest of the mountain; but few only could climb at a time, and the enemy, massing their force at the several points of attack, soon dislodged the brave heroes who had actually gained the very summit. The side of the mountain being so precipitous it was impossible to reform there, and the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers were obliged to retire some distance from the ground held by them previous to the charge. The ground occupied by the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers being better adapted for reforming, this regiment fell back about 100 paces. After reforming, the One hundred and <ar73_204> fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers were moved to the support of the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers; the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers formed line to the left of that position. The Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers having reported, was assigned a position in the rear of the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers. At this time orders were received to advance again, and, if possible, dislodge the enemy. For this purpose four companies of the Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers were thrown to the left of the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers to extend its line. The nature of the ground, as before, prevented much regularity of movements, but the officers and men rushed forward impetuously, determined to carry the heights, and so far succeeded that the greater part of the advance gained the crest, but the enemy having every advantage of position poured in a fire so destructive that after a brief struggle the line was again forced back to its last position. Here the several regiments held the ground, keeping up an irregular fire until about 7 o'clock, when, in obedience to orders received from the division commander, the several regiments retired to the base of the mountain. During the action six regiments of the brigade only were engaged, the One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers having been detached two days previously as guard for the train. I cannot too highly recommend to you the heroic behavior of Lieut. Col. A. H. Jackson, One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, who, although opposed by an overwhelming force of the enemy, held his position with firmness. Lieut. Col. E. Fourat's (Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers) coolness and bravery inspired the officers and men of his regiment to noble deeds. Colonel Lockman, Lieutenant-Colonel Allen, and Major Cresson did honor to their country. They were always to be found where the engagement was the hottest. Captain Davis, of your staff, did handsomely at the head of the re-enforcements he brought to my right. Cols. P. H. Jones and G. W. Mindil, although unwell, were with their commands and deserve great praise. High praise also is due to the officers of my staff--Capt. C. C. Brown, acting assistant adjutant-general; Captain Courtois, provost-marshal; Lieut. T. H. Lee, acting aide-de-camp, and Lieut. J. L. Harding, acting assistant inspector-general--in conveying my orders promptly to the very front of the skirmish line and exposing themselves regardless of danger to the fire of the enemy. It is with deep regret that I announce the death of Capt. Henry C. Bartlett and Lieut. Joseph L. Miller, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers. They were killed while gallantly leading their men in the last assault. Capt. Edwin Forrest, One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, is reported fatally wounded. Capt. James R. Sanford, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, was severely wounded and has since had a leg amputated. All were officers of gallantry and merit, whose loss will be deeply felt in their several commands. Col. P. H. Jones and Capt. C. P. Vedder, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers; Lieut. Moses Baldwin. One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, and Lieut. Sidney R. Smith, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, were slightly wounded, but I trust will soon be able to rejoin their commands. The casualties of regiments engaged are as follows: Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1 enlisted man killed and 5 enlisted men wounded; Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1 enlisted man killed, 30 enlisted men <ar73_205> wounded, and 10 enlisted men missing; One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, 1 commissioned officer and 12 enlisted men wounded, and 1 enlisted man missing; One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, 11 enlisted men killed, 1 commissioned officer and 23 enlisted men wounded; One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, 8 enlisted men killed, 2 commissioned officers and 41 enlisted men wounded, and 7 enlisted men missing; Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, 2 commissioned officers killed, 2 commissioned officers and 25 enlisted men wounded, and 3 enlisted men missing; total, 2 officers and 25 enlisted men killed, 6 officers and 136 enlisted men wounded, 21 enlisted men missing.
        I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully,

                                                            A. BUSCHBECK,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

                                                            Capt. THOMAS H. ELLIOTT,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.

-----

                                                            HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., SECOND DIV., 20TH CORPS,
                                                            Near Cassville, Ga., May 22, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report:
        After the battle of Mill Creek Gap, on the 8th instant, the command encamped at the foot of the mountain. The day following, the 9th instant, the brigade moved into the woods and encamped, remaining there the 10th and 11th instant, throwing up breast-works and doing picket duty. May 12, marched at 7 a.m. through Snake Creek Gap and bivouacked. May 13, moved forward in the direction of Resaca, and at night, about 9 o'clock, bivouacked behind breastworks on the left of the road, forming the left of the division. The brigade remained in this position until the next afternoon, when the regiments were disposed so as to occupy the whole of the breastworks previously held by the whole division, the other two brigades having moved to another position. Between 10 and 11 p.m. the brigade marched, and about 3 a.m. on the 15th instant took position in the rear of the division. At 10 a.m. the command moved forward against the enemy, who occupied a strong position on the crest of several hills, and well fortified by rifle-pits; about 1.30 p.m. formed in three lines of battle and moved forward, the Third Division in advance, driving the enemy from the first three lines of rifle, pits. The column halted and reformed at the base of the third hill. The One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, and One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers forming the first line. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Seventy-third and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, held the line of works immediately in rear of the first column. The four regiments mentioned above received orders direct from Major-General Hooker to advance and take a battery in their front. Colonel Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, being the senior officer in command, took command of that portion of the brigade. The detachment moved forward over a line of breast-works from which the enemy had been driven, and over the works and down the slope. The men charged up the hill under a severe enfilading fire, some of the men entering the battery. I respectfully refer you to the report of Colonel Lockman for further information in regard to the movements of these four regiments. <ar73_206> Colonel Cobham, commanding Third Brigade, having been placed in command of the line by order of General Hooker, these regiments remained with him until late in the evening. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers and Twenty-seventh and Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers remained in their position until about 9 p.m., when they were sent out to relieve troops in front and to assist in removing the four pieces of artillery which had been commanded by our troops since the assault. The regiments remained chiefly engaged at this work and throwing up rifle-pits until the desired object had been attained, when the whole brigade took position in the line of breast-works held previously, they having been relieved by other troops. Officers commanding regiments of this brigade--Col. J. T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers; Lieut. Col. A. Riedt, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; Lieut. Col. A. H. Jackson, One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers; Lieut. Col. E. Fourat, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers; Maj. C. C. Cresson, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers; Maj. L. D. Warner, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, and Capt. F. L. Gimber, One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers--behaved with coolness and bravery, and all officers and men sustained their previous reputations for gallantry and soldierly qualities. It is with sorrow that I announce the death of Lieut. Col. Edward F. Lloyd, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, who fell mortally wounded while gallantly leading his men to the assault on the battery. Capt. N. K. Bray, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, was wounded in the thigh, and Lieut. Charles A. Ahreets, acting adjutant One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, was slightly wounded in the head, and has since returned to his regiment. Losses in the regiments are as follows: Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, 4 enlisted men slightly wounded, 1 enlisted man missing; Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, 2 enlisted men killed, 1 commissioned officer and 24 men wounded, 1 missing; One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, 4 enlisted men wounded; One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, 1 commissioned officer killed, 12 enlisted men wounded and 1 missing; One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, 1 enlisted man killed and 7 wounded; Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 5 wounded; One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, 1 commissioned officer and 11 enlisted men wounded. May 16, the enemy having retreated during the night, the brigade moved at 8 a.m., fording the Oostenaula River. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers was here detached to proceed to Fields' Ferry to procure boats. The Coosawattee River was crossed in boats at Bryant's Ferry, the command bivouacking on Bryant's farm. May 17, marched at 1 p.m. and encamped on Peters' farm, near the forks of the Calhoun and Adairsville roads. May 18, moved at 5 a.m., halting for the First Division to pass, and bivouacked on the Kingston road. May 19, moved at 6.15 a.m. in the direction of Cassville, crossing Two-Run Creek, and went into camp about two miles from that place, where the brigade is now encamped.
        I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            A. BUSCHBECK,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding Second Brigade.

                                                            Capt. THOMAS H. ELLIOTT,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 220.--Report of Col. John T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry, commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 22-June 7.
<ar73_207>

                                                            HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., SECOND DIV., 20TH CORPS,
                                                            In the Field, near Allatoona Creek, Ga., June 12, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report pursuant to orders from headquarters Second Division, Twentieth Corps:
        I assumed command of the Second Brigade on the 22d of May, 1864. May 23, the brigade moved at 6 a.m. toward and across the Etowah River and bivouacked. May 24, marched at 6 a.m. in the direction of Burnt Hickory, passing through that place and went into camp about one mile beyond. May 25, marched at 6.15 a.m. toward and across Pumpkin Vine Creek; had proceeded about one mile and a half in the direction of Dallas when the advance of our division was suddenly attacked. The brigade was formed in support of the First Brigade at right angles with the road leading to Dallas--the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers right of road, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers in support; Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers and One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers left of the road, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers in support. Remained in this position for one hour. The Third Brigade came up and formed on left of road and parallel thereto. The brigade then formed in continuation of line of the Third Brigade. At 6 p.m. formed line of battle at right angles with the road, four regiments on right and two on left of road, and moved forward to the attack, the Third Brigade in advance, First Brigade forming second line, Second Brigade third line. After moving in line about one mile and a half, the last half mile under a severe fire of musketry and canister, it became so dark that it was impossible to proceed farther. The line was therefore halted, retaining the position gained. May 26, at daylight the Third Brigade moved to the right of the position held by them during the night, leaving a gap which I filled with the One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, who built breast-works and held the position until a change in the line was made, which, when completed, brought the Third Brigade on the right, Second Brigade in the center, and the First Brigade on the left. This position was held during the 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th, and 31st instant.
        At noon on June 1 were relieved by Colonel Walcutt's brigade, of the Fifteenth Corps, and then moved to the left about four miles and went into camp. June 2, at 11.30 a.m. moved two miles farther to the left, in rear of the Twenty-third Corps. Remained in this position during the 3d, 4th, and 5th instant. June 6, marched at 6 a.m. in the direction of Big Shanty, crossing Allatoona Creek, and went into camp near that place, about three and a half miles from Acworth, where the brigade remained June 7, 1864. From the night of May 25 until noon of June 1 this command was constantly under fire. I cannot speak in too high terms of the gallant conduct of both of-ricers and men during this time. Hardly a night passed but that they were under arms and at all times required to be on the alert, besides performing heavy fatigue duty in throwing up breast-works <ar73_208> and strengthening their position in front of the First Brigade. I regret to announce the death of Capt. Charles J. Field, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, who died from the effects of wounds received May 28. He was an officer of great promise, and his loss will be deeply felt by his command. Lieuts. C. L. Barnhart and D. P. Horton, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, and Lieut. Robert Moore, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, were slightly wounded.
        The casualties in the brigade were as follows: Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, 14 enlisted men wounded; One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, 2 commissioned officers and 9 enlisted men wounded; Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, 1 commissioned officer and 5 enlisted men killed, 27 enlisted men wounded; One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, 2 enlisted men killed and 16 enlisted men wounded; One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, 5 enlisted men wounded; One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, 1 commissioned officer and 8 enlisted men wounded, 1 enlisted man missing; total, 1 commissioned officer and 7 enlisted men killed, 3 commissioned officers and 79 enlisted men wounded, 1 enlisted man missing.
        I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            JOHN T. LOCKMAN,
                                                                    Colonel 119th New York Volunteers, Comdg. Brigade.

                                                            Capt. THOMAS H. ELLIOTT,
                                                                    Assistant Adjutant-General.


O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXVIII/2 [S# 73]
MAY 1-SEPTEMBER 8, 1864.--The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 225.--Report of Col. John T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry.
[ar73_231 con't]

        May 4, agreeable to orders, broke camp in Lookout Valley and marched about five miles and bivouacked near Chattanooga Creek at night-fall. May 5, regiment detailed as train guard. Marched about twelve miles and bivouacked at midnight. May 6, moved at 5 a.m. and marched about eight miles and bivouacked near Pea Vine Church. May 7, moved at 4.30 a.m. and marched fifteen miles; bivouacked in Dogwood Valley. May 8, pursuant to orders, we left camp at 11 a.m. and took the road leading to Dug Gap. My regiment was assigned the advance. The usual precautionary measures were taken, and when about one and a half miles distant from the gap, a strong line of skirmishers was sent out to the right of the road. As we approached the gap, some of my men engaged the rebel cavalry near Mr. Hall's house, and secured 1 horse, the enemy making good their escape through the thick undergrowth which lined both sides of the road. The brigade was formed in line of battle to the right of the junction of the roads which led to the Dug Gap road, and orders were sent me to deploy my whole regiment and skirmish as necessity required, and to cover the front of the brigade. I skirmished on a line parallel to the road leading to the gap, and in crossing Mill Creek the skirmish line inclined to the left, parallel with the road, and the brigade line to the right. As soon as I discovered the position of the two lines, I hastened to the brigade commander in person and reported. The brigade commander directed me to push on, and, if possible, carry the gap with my line. I returned to make the disposition, and when the brigade moved forward I pushed with a small party up the road, and received the first fire of the enemy, which wounded the leading skirmisher. <ar73_232> The firing soon became general. The part assigned to my line was carried out in so far as we kept up the line and pushed as far as the palisades, where the whole brigade line and the support of the First Brigade concentrated in a short time. The ascent was difficult and very fatiguing. The men were compelled to pause for rest, and while so doing an unaccountable panic seized the line in advance, and soon the whole mass retreated in confusion, except some brave spirits who maintained the position they had gained and called loudly to those in retreat to return. No effort could induce or drive the men back to the point abandoned, which, as near as I could judge, was about sixty yards from the crest. I got my command together and held the point on the right and left, on the road which we had reached in the first advance. Another advance was ordered, when we gained about 100 feet in the ascent, and being unsupported on either flank, I held the point gained and went to the Fifth Ohio, which was then forming in rear of my line, for one company of the regiment to fill up a gap between the brigade line and my own. Colonel Kilpatrick, commanding the regiment, informed me that he would be glad to do so, but the line was about being ordered back, which was done in good order. My regiment was again assigned the advance, and I was afterward directed to take charge of the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and with my own regiment protected the division hospital. The casualties of my regiment on this day are 13 wounded and 1 missing. May 9, on guard at division hospital. At 11.30 p.m. was ordered to report to brigade headquarters with my regiment. After reporting was ordered to build rifle-pits near division headquarters, on the left of One hundred and fifty-fourth New York line, in continuation thereof. May 10, finished rifle-pits at 4 a.m.; men much fatigued, having all been on picket and guard duty the night after the action, thus making nearly forty-eight hours' duty. May 11, all day in the rifle-pits. Nothing important occurred. May 12, received marching orders. Regiment moved at 7 a.m. and marched to Sugar Valley, and bivouacked for the night outside the intrenchments erected by General McPherson's command. May 13, orders to move at 6 a.m. Did not get fairly off until 1 p.m., and then moved through Sugar Valley to vicinity of Resaca, where we formed line, artillery and musketry firing in our front. At 7 p.m. we occupied rifle-pits vacated by Third Division, Twentieth Corps. Nothing of importance during the night. May 14, all day in rifle-pits. At 6 p.m. First and Third Brigades moved to the left of the Fourth Corps, our brigade occupying the line vacated by our division. At 10 p.m. we were ordered to join division; marched until 4 a.m. May 15, when we halted and rented until 5 a.m.; moved to the crest of a hill on the extreme left of the line. At 8 a.m. joined the column, and at 1.30 p.m. was in line with rest of brigade, my regiment being the last of supporting column. The Third Division having the advance, we all moved forward, the enemy being driven from their first three lines of rifle-pits, all of which were built on the crest of three difficult hills. After the second line was taken my regiment got in the advance of the others of our brigade, except the Thirty-third New Jersey and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York. At the base of the third hill our men were allowed to rest a few moments, when Colonel Fessenden, of Hooker's staff, came with a verbal order from General Hooker for the three regiments to advance, and that the senior officer assume command of the same. I immediately assumed command <ar73_233> of the above-mentioned regiments, Thirty-third New Jersey and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York, and, with my own, moved up the side of the hill on which we had rested, inclining to the right, as directed by Colonel Fessenden, over a line of men lying behind the breast-works from which the enemy had been driven, and over the works and down the slope to a thickly wooded ravine where, being informed that a line of the Third Brigade, Second Division, was in my immediate front, I moved the regiments to the left and formed a charge--One hundred and nineteenth, Lieut. Col. E. F. Lloyd, on the right, Thirty-third New Jersey, Lieutenant-Colonel Fourat, on the left, One hundred and thirty-fourth, LieutenantColonel Jackson, on the left center. While here Colonel Fessenden brought an order from General Hooker to take the line at all hazards, and showed me a note from Colonel Cobham, who was in part possession of same, requiring more troops. I ordered the line forward, and we pushed up the hill under a terrific musketry fire, and reached that portion of the line where Colonel Cobham's troops were lying, some of the men entering the rebel battery. At this moment Lieut. Col. E. F. Lloyd fell mortally wounded, and several men near him were struck. I ordered the line to lie down, and learned from Colonel Cobham that all that was required was to hold the hill. The battery having been secured, and he having been placed in command of the whole line, by order of General Hooker, I became subject to his orders. We remained in possession, and at 9 p.m., fresh troops having been sent out, by direction of Colonel Cobham, I withdrew the three regiments to the foot of the hill. The rest of the brigade was sent out, and I requested Colonel Cobham to permit the three regiments to return to camp, which was granted. Two regiments, One hundred and thirty-fourth and One hundred and nineteenth New York, had moved off, and Thirty-third New Jersey was about to follow, when an attack was made by the enemy. Colonel Cobham requested them to remain, which they did, and assisted in bringing off the captured guns. In conclusion, I must remark that the action of Lieut. Col. E. F. Lloyd deserves the highest praise. He sealed with his life the last gallant act of the soldier and patriot, never wavering, but pushing forward to the post of greatest danger, where he fell mortally wounded and died in a few hours. May 16, the enemy having retreated during the night of the 15th and morning of the 16th, we received orders at 5 a.m. to move in pursuit. We marched out with the brigade, taking the road to the left of the railroad. At 11.30 a.m. we forded the river at ------ Ferry, the water breast high. At 6 p.m. we crossed the Coosawattee River at Bryant's Ferry and bivouacked for the night. May 17, moved suddenly, at 11.30 a.m., and marched to vicinity of Calhoun and bivouacked. May 18, moved to vicinity of Adairsville and bivouacked. May 19, moved at 5 a.m. and marched toward Cassville. When near the place we formed a line; the One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania were deployed as skirmishers, with my regiment as support. After moving about one and a half miles met Fourth Corps skirmishers, and acted in concert with them. The line moved forward in the direction of the firing, but was delayed by a wide and deep creek: after bridging and crossing the same, darkness closed the work of the day. May 20, camped near Cassville, and rested in camp during May 20, 21, and 22. May 23, Colonel Lockman being ordered to assume command of Second Brigade, Capt. C. H. Odell, Company I, was, in accordance to seniority of rank, placed in command <ar73_234> of his regiment. Took up our line of march again, after three days' rest, in the position assigned us in the brigade, and bivouacked about 7.30 p.m. May 24, detached as wagon guard Second Division ammunition train, and after guarding the train into camp, at 8 p.m. received orders to rejoin the brigade and camp for the night. May 25, the advance regiment of the brigade; nothing unusual occurred until about 10 a.m. when near the Pumpkin Vine Creek, when our advance was fired upon by the enemy's cavalry. The whole column being halted to repair the bridge over the creek, my regiment was detailed to picket the hills on the immediate right and covering the flank of the brigade, to guard against a surprise. The bridge being completed, my regiment was withdrawn and marched in its position. After marching about three miles it was discovered the enemy was in heavy force in our front, and we were immediately deployed into line of battle on the right side of the road, and ordered to throw up breast-works, more especially to protect our right flank, but in compliance with orders, our position, in connection with that of brigade, was changed to the left of the road, our front parallel to and facing from it. I was then ordered to send out a scouting party, for which purpose I ordered a sergeant and twelve men. They failed to discover any enemy, and about 6 p.m. was ordered to recall them. About 7 p.m. the whole brigade was deployed on the right side of the road; in this position we advanced, One hundred and thirty-fourth on my left and my regiment on the right of the brigade. I advanced, complying with the various orders received from time to time, in as well closed a line as the unevenness of the ground, the many obstructions, and the increasing darkness would allow, and pushed on under the heavy fire of canister and shell from the enemy, and passing over two lines of battle, which were lying upon the ground, until ordered to halt upon the hill, where we afterward intrenched ourselves. In this position we rested on our arms for the night. May 26, receiving orders to build breast-works, I proceeded to construct them in continuation of the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers on my left. This was the second line of our defenses. This position I occupied until about 8 p.m. on the 28th instant, when I was ordered to relieve the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers from the front line of works, which I accordingly did. The One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania was on my right and the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York on my left. May 29, still occupying the same relative position. Capt. C. H. Odell, commanding, being taken sick, went to the rear, and Capt. C. H. Southworth assumed command. Very heavy skirmishing all day, and about 11 o'clock in the night the enemy made several ineffectual demonstrations along our line, more particularly on our left, and were repulsed each time. My command saved their fire for close engagements, but as the enemy failed to approach near, there were but few shots fired. May 30, relieved from my position by the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, I again occupied the second line of breast-works. May 31, still in same position; agreeable to orders, sent out fatigue parties to build an advanced breast-work.
        June 1 and 2, still in same position; about 11 a.m., our corps being relieved by the Fifteenth Corps, we moved up toward the left and bivouacked in the woods for the night. June 3, moved about two miles farther toward the left and remained in that position until the morning of June 7; changed position again, moving still farther to the left, and about 2 p.m. halted in the woods and <ar73_235> threw up breast-works, agreeable to orders received, and remained in this position until June 8, when Colonel Lockman again assumed command of the regiment. June 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, in the same position taken up by the regiment on the 7th of June. Moved at 1 p.m., and took position in rear of our division. On the 15th of June orders to move were received at 11 a.m.; while en route to the position assigned our brigade, I was detailed as division field officer of the day, and the command of the regiment devolved upon Capt. C. H. Southworth, senior officer. About 3 p.m., line having been formed, we moved forward and drove in the enemy's skirmishers. At 5 p.m. another advance was made, and the enemy was driven to his works. I rejoined the regiment at 8 p.m. and ordered the men to build a breast-work of logs, which was commenced at once, the men working zealously. A few spades and picks were procured, and a slight work was finished before daylight of the 16th of June, when we discovered that we were less than 250 yards from the enemy's works, which were of formidable strength, and from which they fired upon my men with deadly effect. The troops on the right of my regiment having been withdrawn during the night, it left the right flank of my regiment exposed to an enfilading fire of the enemy's skirmishers and main line. I sent out a party to drive them off, but out of 7 who started but 1 escaped, the others being either killed or wounded. I then requested Colonel Ireland to advance his line of skirmishers on a line with my men, which he did promptly, and by a united effort the line of the enemy's skirmishers was thrown back. The Thirty-third New Jersey rendered me very efficient assistance, and, in a measure, the success of the movement is due to them. The enemy still kept up a fire from their main works, and from the formation of the ground it enfiladed my line, and all the troops being withdrawn made a fair mark of the regiment. I requested to be withdrawn, but was informed by Colonel Jones, commanding brigade, that he had received positive orders to hold our position at all hazards, and that he had ordered the rest of the brigade to assist. The Thirty-third New Jersey and my command were posted. We held the position during the day, and at 9 p.m. were relieved by the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, Colonel Jackson. My loss this day was 26 killed and wounded, and for 15th and 16th of June, 40(*) out of 134, the number the regiment went into action with. The rebels retreated during the night of the 16th, and morning of the 17th a general advance was made, and the rebel line found strongly intrenched about three miles from the position evacuated by them the previous night. We built breast-works and occupied them during the 18th, our artillery firing with good effect upon the enemy's works. June 19, the rebels having falling back during the night of the 18th, we pursued and found them strongly intrenched about three miles from their former position. June 20, brigade in reserve until 11 a.m., when we relieved Third Brigade; my regiment was assigned the left of the line. Orders received to be ready to move, as we were to be relieved by the Fourth Corps. June 21, Fourth Corps relieved us at 8 a.m.; moved about two miles to the right, our brigade being next the First Division on the right, Third Brigade of our division left, my regiment connecting with Third Brigade on left and One hundred and fifty-fourth New York on the right, intrenched. June 22, advanced our line about one mile. The <ar73_236> enemy attacked First Division, but was repulsed. Our line was only lightly assailed by the enemy's skirmishers, who were easily driven back. June 23, 24, 25, and 26, still in same position. June 27, line formed at 6 a.m., brigade in advance of the division, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York on the right of the line, my regiment second; Seventy-third Pennsylvania was on my left. Our brigade advanced about a mile, driving the enemy's pickets, and, capturing a number of them, held the ground and built intrenchments. June 28 and 29, in same position. June 30, 8 p.m. our division moved to the right; relieved a division of Twenty-third Corps. My regiment was assigned to an out-work, which I occupied.
        July 1, still in advance work, a post of observation; enemy made no demonstration. July 2, still in out-works; was relieved at 7 p.m., and returned to main line of works, and was placed in reserve. July 3, the enemy retreated during the night; our division moved out and occupied their works. We began to pursue about 6 a.m., and came up with and found them strongly posted and intrenched about nine miles from the Chattahoochee River. July 4, opposite the enemy; no works built by our division; desultory picket-firing. July 5, enemy retreated during the night; moved in pursuit at daylight; came up with them at 4 p.m., posted on the north bank of the Chattahoochee River. July 6, moved at 3 p.m., our division said to be in reserve. July 7, moved at 8 a.m., took position on right of Third Division, my regiment having left of line, One hundred and fifty-fourth on my right. July 7, 8, 9, in same position. July 10, rebels fell back across the Chattahoochee River; regiment in old position. July 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16, in same position. July 17, orders to move; marched at 4 p.m.; crossed the Chattahoochee River at Pace's Ferry and bivouacked at 11.30 p.m. near Nancy's Creek. July 18, moved at 8 a.m., my regiment in the advance; crossed Nancy's Creek and moved in line to within a mile of Buck Head; no enemy seen intrenched. July 19, moved at 6 a.m., Third Brigade in advance; crossed Peach Tree Creek after a slight skirmish; intrenched. July 20, moved out of our works at 6 a.m. and occupied an advanced position. At 11 a.m. were ordered to support First Brigade; my regiment was detached to skirmish. The Third Division being near the point I was required for, and their skirmishers occupying it, I was not required, and returned to the brigade. About 2 p.m. was ordered to support Thirty-third New Jersey, who had been sent to occupy a hill some distance in advance of our line. Had just reached the works of First Brigade, when I was ordered back by General Geary, as the enemy was advancing in force. I moved with my regiment about 100 yards to the right, when our whole line was attacked by the enemy, who having penetrated a gap between the lines of First and Second Divisions, threw the right into some confusion. Order was speedily restored and the enemy repulsed. When the enemy appeared on the flank I took position with my regiment at right angles with the works; the Sixtieth New York came in and took position on the right of my regiment. I afterward changed to the right of Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the three regiments, Sixtieth New York, Seventy-third Pennsylvania, and One hundred and nineteenth New York, built works at right angles to the former works. To Captain Bundy's battery the highest credit is due. By his courageous fighting of the battery the result attained is mainly due. July 21, still in same position at Peach Tree Creek. July 22, the enemy retreated during the night; we pursued at 6 a.m. and drove their skirmishers to <ar73_237> their works; about two miles from Atlanta took position and intrenched. July 23, 24, and 25, engaged building an advance line of works, regiment furnishing details for that purpose. July 26, works finished; Seventy-third Pennsylvania moved out to occupy; my regiment followed, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York following me; strengthened our works during the night. July 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, still in works.
        August 1 to 24, still occupying works; nothing of note occurred. August 25, orders to move received; regiment left the works at 8.45 p.m., and moved with division column to Pace's Ferry. My regiment was moved one-half mile farther to the right on the afternoon of the 29th, and began fortifying. August 30 and 31, engaged fell-ing trees and strengthening intrenchments.
        September 1, still in same position. September 2, ordered to move at 1 p.m.; moved out of camp; at 2 p.m. was en route for the city of Atlanta. To my regiment was assigned the honor of entering the city at the head of the brigade column. At 8 p.m. we halted and bivouacked on Peters street, in rear of the City Hall.
        I cannot close this report without paying a tribute to the men who have pressed on under all circumstances, working steadily to accomplish the end for which the campaign was inaugurated; they have labored faithfully through a campaign lasting quite four months without murmuring or evincing the slightest discontent. Their patriotism and endurance are deserving of the highest encomiums of praise. To my officers I have but one acknowledgment to make for their zealous and hearty co-operation and faithful discharge of all duties assigned to them. My command numbered on 4th of May, 1864, 183 effective men. The number killed, wounded, and missing during the campaign was 89. I respectfully submit herewith a return of the killed, wounded, and missing.(*)
        I have the honor to remain, your very obedient servant,

                                                            JOHN T. LOCKMAN,
                                                                    Colonel, Comdg. 119th New York Volunteers.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIV [S# 92]
NOVEMBER 15-DECEMBER 21, 1864.--The Savannah (Georgia) Campaign.
No. 108.--Report of Col. John T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry, of operations September 1-December 21.
[ar92_299 con't]

                                                            HDQRS. 119TH REGT. NEW YORK STATE VOLUNTEERS,
                                                            Savannah, Ga., December 23, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with circular order I have the honor to submit the following resume of events since September 1, 1864, and report of the part taken by my regiment in the campaign just closed by the fall of Savannah, Ga.:
        September 1, regiment engaged in building works near Pace's Ferry. September 2, still at Pace's Ferry; 1 p.m. our brigade received orders to move, and at 8 p.m. we halted at Atlanta. September 3, moved out <ar92_300> and occupied rebel works on easterly side of the city. September 4, assigned position on westerly side of McDonough road. September 5 to November 5, inclusive, regiment occupied same position. On the afternoon of November 5 regiment was ordered to be ready to move, and at 3 p.m. marched out on McDonough road about one mile and a half and bivouacked for the night, and on 6th of November returned to our camp, where regiment remained until the morning of November 15, when regiment moved from camp and marched to the vicinity of Stone Mountain. On the 16th of November march resumed; bivouacked at night near Sheffield. November 17, marched to vicinity of Social Circle, destroying railroad track. November 18, moved at 5 a.m.; passed through Social Circle and bivouacked near Madison; portions of railroad track destroyed. November 19, moved at 5 a.m.; passed through Madison, the division being on special duty; several miles of railroad track destroyed, also depot at Buck Head; cavalry burned railroad bridge over Oconee River. November 20, moved at 7 a.m.; bivouacked at Denham's Mill. November 21, moved at 8 a.m. and marched toward the Oconee River; bivouacked about six miles from Eatonton. November 22, moved at 6.30 a.m. and crossed the Oconee River, and reached Milledgeville at 5 p.m.; passed through and bivouacked on the south side of the Oconee River. November 23, resting at Milledgeville. November 24, moved about eleven miles and bivouacked near Gum Creek. November 25, moved at 7 a.m. and bivouacked at Buffalo Creek. November 26, moved at 6 a.m., reaching Sandersville at 1 p.m.; at 4 p.m. moved to Tennille. November 27, moved at 6 a.m.; engaged all day in destroying railroad track and bridges; bivouacked at Davisborough. November 28, moved at 11 a.m. and reached Spiers at 6 p.m. and bivouacked. November 29, moved at 8 a.m. and marched to Bostwick; regiment engaged in tearing up and destroying railroad track. November 30, burned bridge over Ogeechee River, and trestle-work over Williamson's Swamp. At 4 p.m. moved to rejoin division and reached Louisville at 9 p.m., where we bivouacked.
        December 1, moved at 11 a.m. in the direction of Millen and bivouacked at night about twelve miles northeast from Millen. December 2, moved at 6 a.m. and bivouacked near Buck Head Creek. December 3, moved at 11 a.m. and bivouacked near ------ Creek; division as rear guard. December 4, moved at 10.30 a.m. and bivouacked near Horse Creek. December 5, moved at daylight and crossed Horse Creek; division still rear guard. December 6, regiment detailed to forage for brigade. December 7, regiment still on duty foraging for brigade; rejoined same near Springfield. December 8, moved at 7 a.m. and crossed Ebenezer Creek, and bivouacked for the night near Eden. December 9, moved at 8 a.m., First Division leading; at 2 p.m. rebels opened with artillery on the advance; the enemy was soon driven; our brigade sent to support Colonel Carman's brigade, of the First Division; the enemy retreated and we were not needed; bivouacked for the night fourteen miles from Savannah. December 10, moved at 2.30 p.m. and bivouacked four miles from Savannah. December 11 to 20, in reserve in rear of first line. December 21, moved at 5 a.m. and entered Savannah at 6.30 a.m.
        There are no casualties to report.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            JOHN T. LOCKMAN,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding 119th New York Volunteers.

                                                            Capt. N. K. BRAY,
                                                                    Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Brig., Second Div., 20th Corps.


O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLVII/1 [S# 98]
JANUARY 1-APRIL 26, 1865.--The Campaign of the Carolinas.
No. 166.--Reports of Col. John T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Infantry, of operations January 27-March 25 and April 10-May 23.
<ar98_737>

                                                            HDDRS. 119TH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
                                                            Near Goldsborough, N. C., April 9, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the campaign of the Carolinas:
        January 27, moved from Savannah, Ga., about 9 a.m., and at 2 p.m. bivouacked at a point about twelve miles therefrom. January 28, moved at 6 a.m. and bivouacked about twenty-five miles from Savannah. January 29, moved at 9 a.m., my regiment on train guard; camped about 4 p.m. three miles from Sister's Ferry, Ga. January 30-31, in camp; no move; furnished fatigue details to work on corduroying road.
        February 1, 2, 3, still in camp; road unfinished. February 4, moved at 6 a.m.; marched to and across Savannah River and bivouacked near Robertsville; road in an awful state. February 5, moved about 1 p.m. and marched eight miles to Johnson's Cross-Roads and bivouacked. February 6, moved at 8 a.m. with train; reached camp at 5.30 p.m. February 7, moved at 7 a.m. and bivouacked north of the Little Salkehatchie River. February 8, moved at 6 a.m.; crossed Salkehatchie River and encamped on north side of same about 5.30 p.m. February 9, moved at 6 a.m., my regiment in advance; reached Blackville and joined the corps at 3 p.m., marching eighteen miles. February 10, moved into town. Brigade disposed to cover train and town. Division moved to Duncan's Bridge over South Fork of the Edisto River. February 11, moved at 9 a.m. with train; reached Duncan's Bridge at 1 p.m.; bridge not finished; bivouacked for the night south of the bridge. February 12, moved at 6 a.m. and crossed South Fork of the Edisto and marched to North Fork, about fourteen miles. First Brigade skirmished with the enemy. February 13, crossed North Fork of the Edisto River at Jones' Bridge; enemy retreated; bivouacked about six miles from Edisto River. February 14, moved at 9 a.m. and bivouacked at ----- Cross-Roads about 1 p.m. for the night. February 15, moved at 7 a.m. and crossed Congaree Creek and bivouacked near Lexington. February 16, moved at 9 a.m., guarding train; bivouacked about four miles from Congaree River. February 17, moved at 9 a.m. and bivouacked at Zion Church, about four miles distant. Columbia occupied by Fifteenth Corps. February 18, moved at 9 a.m. and crossed Saluda River. Bivouacked about five miles from Broad River. February 19, moved about 2 p.m. and bivouacked at 11.30 p.m. near Freshly's Ferry over Broad River. February 20, moved at 1 p.m. and crossed Broad River at Freshly's Ferry. Bivouacked at 8 p.m. about nine miles from Winnsborough. February 21, moved at 6 a.m. Advance entered Winnsborough at 11 a.m.; at 2 p.m. moved through town and destroyed railroad track. February 22, continued tearing up and burning track. Moved to White Oak Station and thence to Wateree Meeting-House; joined division and bivouacked at 8 p.m. February '23, moved at 6 a.m. Regiment detailed to forage for the brigade. Crossed Broad River and bivouacked near Third Division, having marched nearly thirty miles. February 24, moved at 7 a.m. After marching all day returned to camp unable to procure provisions. «47 R R VOL XLVII, PT I» <ar98_738> Mounted foragers preceded us several miles and gathered the stores. February 25, all day in camp near Liberty Hal1. February 26, moved at 8 a.m., guarding train; bivouacked at Hanging Rock at 4 p.m. February 27, changed camp, crossing a branch of Lynch's Creek. February 28, moved at 6.30 a.m., brigade in advance; built about two miles of corduroy road; bivouacked at Clyburn's Store.
        March 1, regiment detailed to proceed to Manoy's Mill to procure flour and meal for division; reached mill about 6 p.m. March 2, to Manoy's Mill. Men mill all day and ground about 2,000 pounds of meal and 1,000 pounds of flour. March 3, to Manoy's Mill. Men mill all night, having ground about 4,000 pounds of meal and 2,500 pounds of flour. I moved at 6 a.m. and joined division at Chesterfield CourtHouse at 11 p.m. March 4, moved at 11.30 a.m. and bivouacked near Sneedsborough, N. C., 6 p.m. March 5, still in camp near Sneedsborough, waiting pontoon bridge to be laid. March 6, moved at 9 a.m. and marched to Cheraw, S.C., and crossed Great Pedee River; bivouacked about four miles from river. March 7, moved at 6 a.m.; regiment in advance; reached Wilmington and Charlotte Railroad near Station 103 at 12 m.; regiment on picket. March 8, moved at 1 p.m.; regiment rear guard. Roads in a horrible condition. Bivouacked at 10.30 p.m. March 9, moved at 7 a.m. and bivouacked at 7 p.m. near Lumber River. Road almost impassable. March 10, moved at 1 p.m.; crossed Lumber River and bivouacked threemiles north of same. March 11, moved at 1 p.m. and halted at 6 p.m. for supper. March 12, moved at 1 a.m. and marched until 3.30 am. Bivouacked for the night about fourteen miles from Fayetteville. Moved again at 11 a.m. and reached Fayetteville at 6 p.m. Encamped on old U.S. Arsenal grounds. March 13, still in camp. At 2 p.m. division passed and was reviewed by Generals Sherman, Slocum, and Williams. Crossed Cape Fear River, and camped about four miles from. March 14, in camp. No move this date. March 15, division guarding the train of the whole corps. Marched all night. March 16, halted at 8 a.m. for breakfast; moved at 9 a.m. Near South River roads worse than ever.
        March 17, still on the march. Reached and crossed South River and bivouacked about three miles from crossing, having been three days and two nights on the roads. March 18. moved about 9 a.m. and marched about nine miles and encamped for the night. We built several miles of corduroy road. March 19, moved at 6 a.m. and bivouacked about nine miles from point of starting. Heavy firing heard in our front. March 20, First and Third Brigades moved to the front; Second Brigade in charge of the trains of the whole corps. The train was posted and rifle-pits thrown around it. Moved at 2 p.m., and bivouacked near Falling Creek. March 21, moved at 6 a.m.; crossed Falling Creek and bivouacked at Grantham's Store at 3 p.m.; regiment on picket. March 22, moved at 7 a.m. and encamped near railroad crossing on Neuse River. March 23 and 24, still in camp. No change. March 25, moved at 9 a.m.; crossed Neuse River, marched through and encamped near Goldsborough, N. C.
        No casualties.
        Respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            JOHN T. LOCKMAN,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding 119th New York Volunteers.

                                                            Capt. N. K. BRAY,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.

<ar98_739>

                                                            HDQRS. 119TH REGIMENT NEW YORK VOLUNTEERS,
                                                            Near Washington, D.C., May 26, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my regiment during the campaign from April 10, 1865, to May 23, 1865:
        April 10, moved out camp near Goldsborough, N. C., at 5 a.m., and crossed Little River and bivouacked at 10 p.m. near Moccasin Creek. April 11, moved at 6 a.m.; crossed Moccasin Creek and moved toward Smithfield; skirmished with rebel cavalry until 11 a.m.; entered Smithfield at 3 p.m. and bivouacked for the night. April 12, moved at 9 a.m., and crossed the Neuse River and bivouacked at 8 p.m-fourteen miles from Raleigh, N.C. April 13, moved at 6 a.m. and entered Raleigh at 2 p.m. April 14, camped near Raleigh. April, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, in camp near Raleigh, N. C. April 25, moved at 8 a.m. and marched to Jones' Cross-Roads. April 26 and 27, bivouacked at Jones' Cross-Roads, N. C. April 28, moved at 5 a.m. and reached our former camp near Raleigh at 11.30 a.m. April 29. in camp. April 30, moved at 8 a.m., crossed the Neuse River, and bivouacked at Manteo's Mills.
        May 1, moved at 8 a.m.; crossed Cedar Creek and Tar River and bivouacked; marched twenty-three miles that date. May 2, moved at 5 a.m. and marched to Williamsborough and bivouacked at 6 p.m. May 3, moved at 4.30 a.m.; passed through Williamsborough and bivouacked near State line at 10 a.m. May 4, moved at 6.30 a.m. and crossed Roanoke River at Taylor's Ferry; bivouacked at 3 p.m. near Saffold's Bridge, Va. May 5, moved at 7 a.m.; crossed Meherrin River at Saffold's Bridge and bivouacked near Nottoway River. May 6, moved at 5 a.m. and crossed Nottoway and Little Nottoway Rivers and bivouacked near Wilson's Station on South Side Railroad. May 7, moved at 6 a.m. and crossed the Appomattox River and bivouacked at 7 p.m. May 8, moved at 6 a.m. and crossed Swift and Falling Creeks; passed through the town of Clover Hill; bivouacked near Falling Creek, seven miles from Richmond and nine days from the date of departure from Raleigh. May 9, changed camp, moving nearer Richmond. May 10, in camp nearer Manchester. May 11, moved at 10 a.m. and marched through the city of Richmond and bivouacked at 6 p.m. near Brook Creek. May 12, moved at 7 a.m. and bivouacked at Ashland Station. May 13, moved at 6 a.m.; crossed South Anna and Little Rivers; camped on south side of Little River. May 14, moved at 5 a.m.; crossed North Anna River at Anderson's Bridge, passed through Chilesburg, and bivouacked about six miles from Spotsylvania Court-House. May 15, moved at 5 a.m. and passed through Spotsylvania Court-House and Chancellorsville, and crossed the Rappahannock River at United States Ford and bivouacked on north side. May 16, moved at 4.30 a.m. and marched to Bristersburg and bivouacked. May 17, moved at 5 a.m. and marched to and camped at Brentsville. May 15, moved at 9 a.m. and bivouacked near Fairfax Station. May 197 moved at 6 a.m. and marched to Cloud's Mills and camped at 4 p.m. May 20, 21, 22, and 23, in camp at Cloud's Mills.
        No casualties to report.
        Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

                                                            JOHN T. LOCKMAN,
                                                                    Colonel, Commanding 119th New York Volunteers.

                                                            Lieutenant JOSLIN,
                                                                    Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.